Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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2

In the second image there's a metal-bar-looking-thingy right between the mother's and father's head that is very much in focus (at least it looks like that on the web-sized image) - so I would guess the AF focused on that bar and not the mother's face. The area covered by the AF sensor is substantially larger than the rectangle you see in the viewfinder so ...


0

Not necessarily the cause, but I have the same lens (on Nikon mount) and it has been reported to suffer from relatively bad autofocus and sometimes front-focus issues. I saw it happen sometimes with 50 mm focal length, wide aperture (f/4 may still be considered wide in this respect) and close subjects. Your pictures are not actually close-ups, so I would be ...


0

1/3000 Such bright light is crazy fast! What is your ISO here? General rule of thumb suggests you want the slowest ISO possible for the conditions (to avoid noise). Another rule of thumb (for handheld photos), if your shutter speed is faster than your focal length you should be fine (ie., 24mm and 1/30 sec or 200mm at 1/200 should produce shard imagery). No ...


0

Another factor: Digital sensors are typically smaller than 35MM film frames. A lens which only has to produce a good (reasonably flat-focus and evenly lit) image across a smaller area can be simpler/cheaper than one which has to cover a larger area, for the same focal length and light-gathering ability. So some "digital" lenses are so marked as a warning ...


16

Yes, lenses designed for digital sensors have several differences from their older film based camera lens counterparts. One of the primary differences is that digital sensors are more reflective than film, so anti-reflective coatings are applied to the rear element of a digital lens. This helps prevent reflections off the sensor that could result in image ...


6

Some 'film' lenses designed for 35mm rangefinder cameras have a rear element which lies quite close to the plane of the film or sensor (mostly wide-angle lenses). These work fine for film, but when used on a digital camera cause quite noticeable colour shifts to the left and right of the frame. This is due to the extreme angle of the light from the rear ...


6

There is one significant difference between film and digital sensor for lens optics - digital sensors have a bit of glass and some filters in front of them. The lensrental.com blog has a pretty extensive series of posts on the effect of the sensor stack (short version, there is a very real effect for large aperture lenses) - so it is quite possible that the ...


18

I think you are putting too much emphasis on the "digital" part of the DG designation. It seems to be more to differentiate them from "digital" lenses that are APS-C only. Sigma calls their current APS-C only lenses "DC". When digital SLRs first began to gain a foothold in the market, they almost all had sensors that were APS-C or similar sized. So new ...


3

I believe that the easiest way to find out the filter size of a lens is to look at the lens cap. Pretty much the only information that you would find on the cap is who made it and the filter size that it fits. (Provided of course that it's the type of lens cap that attaches to the filter thread.) The lens cap from my Sigma 50-500 lens for example has this ...


3

There is always a specification. You will find it in three places: On the lens, either at the edge around the front optical element or on the side of the barrel. In the manual that came with your lens. On the web. Here is one on Sigma's site. Click Tech Specs to see the table where it says Filter-Size. There will be many numbers on the lens itself but ...


0

This really comes down to a personal choice: whether you prefer the constant aperture and slightly better center of frame sharpness of the 17-50 or the extra reach and better sharpness on the edges and in the corners of the 17-70. For the outdoor stuff the reach of the 17-70 is probably a little better, but for the family photos (especially indoors) the ...


5

This photo is severely back focused. Areas about 15-20 feet behind the main subjects are in focus. Some things to keep in mind: When using wider apertures, especially combined with larger sensors, Depth of Field becomes shallower. So any focusing errors are more apparent. This is especially a problem in low light when most camera's auto focusing systems ...


1

The picture was taken in low light conditions and then the following issues will start to conspire against the sharpness of the picture: The autofocus is not very accurate in low light conditions The small 18mm focal length instead of, say, 50 mm also makes the autofocus less reliable The exposure time of 1/60s seconds is not fast enough to prevent ...


0

I suspect what you're seeing here is that the depth of field when using a large sensor camera like the D5200 is much smaller than that from something like a smartphone or a typical compact camera, especially when you're using a relatively fast lens like your Sigma. It's a little hard to tell on the image you've posted, but it looks to me like the gentleman ...



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