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42

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


26

F-stops deal with doubling/halving the amount of light hitting the sensor. Everything revolves around twos. With the shutter speed, it's easy to understand, as you say. Every shutter f-stop is (roughly) half/double the amount of time as the previous one. Personally, I don't even bother paying attention to the numerator ("1/") part of the shutter speed; I've ...


25

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence to accurately differentiate. Most ...


24

Well, one way of remembering the f-stop scale is to remember that every other value is a multiplication by two, or in more photographic terms...every four-fold jump in light availability is twice the f-stop number. As an example: Double-stops starting at the beginning: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Double-stops starting skipping the first stop: 1.4, 2.8, 5.6, 11.2 ...


24

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


23

I wouldn't worry about it. Shutters can (and do) eventually fail, but the good news is that repair is relatively affordable. I know a few folks who have had shutters replaced, the cost has generally been between $200-300. Take a look at another question which discussions how many actuations are "too many" and talks about the likelihood of failure. Enjoy ...


22

Sounds nice but apparently there are currently some technical limitations: An electronic shutter requires the sensor to be equipped with what is commonly called "snap shutter" circuitry. Basically, this is a second set of diodes, as big as the light gathering photodiodes, but shielded under a dark cover, and some additional switches. To shoot, the ...


22

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


20

Quiet mode slows down the motion of the mirror when it goes up and delays it going back down until the shutter-release is released. Normally the mirror going up and down is the loudest noise the camera makes. So slowing it down causes a longer shutter-lag but makes less noise. Also, the mirror normally comes back down immediately after a shot is taken so ...


20

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


18

The camera is likely setting the shutter speed to match the sync speed of the flash. If it was set any faster, you would get black bands of underexposure across your shots, or at the fastest speeds a completely black shot. This is because the shutters would have finished moving to some degree before the flash completed its fire.


18

Most DLSRs with "silent" or "quiet" shutter modes don't change the speed at which the shutter is operated at all. The transit time each curtain takes to traverse the height of the sensor is constant regardless of the exposure time (shutter speed) selected or if a "quiet" mode is selected. Exposure time is determined by the time difference between the ...


16

What Adam is referring to What Adam is talking about is not actually a rolling shutter, it's just a focal plane shutter. It also does nothing special above 1/200, except that the effect of the shutter curtain has some interesting properties which can become more pronounced at higher speed. The diagrams on the wikipedia page (reproduced below) illustrate it ...


16

Some good readin' here. Some key notes... Cameras, typically smaller point-and-shoot cameras, that use no mechanical shutters typically use an interline transfer sensor. An interline transfer sensor dedicates a portion of each pixel to store the charge for that pixel. The added electronics necessary to be able to store the charge for ...


15

The original cameras didn't use film at all, so there was no noise from any film advance mechanism. Instead they used materials that were inserted in the back of what we now refer to as view cameras while being protected from exposure to light. Each image required changing out the entire back of the camera and replacing it with another glass plate that had ...


14

Probably the reason for using mechanical shutters is that their disadvantages are easiest to live with; competing technologies are not (yet) clearly superior. The major problem is that electronic shutter affecting whole sensor at once is rather easy to be implemented on CCD sensor, while for CMOS (preferred on new DSLRs) it requires additional circuitry in ...


14

For changing the shutter speed, put the mode dial on Tv (as in the image below: make sure the white line corresponds to the letters Tv ), and turn the wheel high-lighted in red below (excuse my crappy images, I edited all this as something quick and dirty). On your LCD screen, you can see the below screen (let me know if you don't know how to get to this ...


13

Anything you can use to trigger the camera shutter without touching it. :o) Serious. It can be a remote or cable based control for your camera shutter. It's main advantage is allowing you to take shots without interfering with the camera stability, but it could also be used for shooting from awkward/distant positions or when taking shots including yourself. ...


13

The shutter you hear is a mechanical shutter and it cannot on a DSLR move fast enough to shoot at video speeds which is between 24 and 60 FPS. High-end mechanical shutters usually top at 12 FPS. The shutter used in video and high-speed drive on some cameras is an electronic shutter. There are no moving parts involved and hence no sound. The sensor simply ...


13

In most scenarios the extra stop between 1/4000 and 1/8000 second will make very little difference in terms of freezing motion. 1/4000 will freeze all but the fastest objects you are likely to encounter, and even 1/2000 will freeze world class human athletes and most animals at typical shooting distances. Where the extra stop will come in handy is when you ...


13

You are correct that the image is inverted as it is projected on the sensor and that the mechanical shutter reveals the bottom of the scene before the top of the scene. What you have missed is that the image (with the shadow of the cork falling on the red shirt at a later time than the the actual cork is seen flying through the air) is not a still frame ...


12

Most of the noise is actually not the shutter, but the mirror folding up. My camera actually have two different ways of reducing this noise somewhat: It has a "quiet" mode, that lets you fold up the mirror and take the picture in two separate actions. Although that doesn't make less noise, you can separate the louder noise of the mirror foldup from the ...


12

ac·tu·ate [ak-choo-eyt] –verb (used with object), -at·ed, -at·ing. 1. to incite or move to action; impel; motivate: actuated by selfish motives. 2. to put into action; start a process; turn on: to actuate a machine. You pretty much have it. A shutter "actuation" is the opening and closing of the shutter when a picture is taken. It should be ...


12

The rolling shutter is a method of image capture which is not by taking a snapshot of the entire scene at single instant in time, but rather by scanning across the scene rapidly (vertically or horizontally). The implications of using a rolling shutter can produce predictable distortions of fast-moving objects or rapid flashes of light such as wobble (jello ...


12

Silent shooting mode normally (*please see the end of the answer for a notable exception) does not affect Image Quality in any way. Rather, it affects the way your 5D mkIII cycles the mirror and shutter curtain for each shot you take. When shooting via the viewfinder: The Silent mode single option uses a slower speed to move the mirror up out of the light ...


11

The short answer is: use a long shutter speed. To control this, put your camera into Shutter Priority mode (indicated by a "S" on the dial" and adjust the speed to a relatively long time - perhaps a half a second, a whole second, or perhaps longer. The longer answer for when it gets tricky: You might find that during the daytime, things are so bright that ...


11

The Canon 600D uses a mechanical shutter, and it does indeed go up to 1/4000th rate. There is no "electronic" shutter in Canon DSLR's that I know of. You pretty much nailed it on the head with your 'ps'...the two shutter curtains race over the sensor with a tiny slit (see 'Focal plane shutter, high speed' figure), with the second curtain a minuscule fraction ...


11

Yes, the A77 has a mechanical shutter and it does move at 12 FPS per second. There are a number of cameras with similar shutter-speeds including some ultra-zooms but indeed this is very fast. What it does not have is a motor to move the mirror. This is more problematic for speed then the shutter itself since a mirror is heavy and has to move out of the way ...


11

I don't know medium format cameras, but in general shutter latency is the time that it takes from when you push the shutter to the time the shutter actually activates. The lower the latency, the more responsive the shutter, but the less time the camera has to make last minute adjustments or changes in hardware state. A higher shutter latency will allow the ...



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