Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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Light is either directly coming from its source or is being reflected by some object into the opening of your lens. The aperture controls how big that opening of the lens is. The shutter speed determines how long that opening is open. More precisely: for how long light going through the lens can reach the sensor. ISO determines how much light will result ...


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The actual shutter speeds we use are necessarily powers of two, but the nominal shutter speeds MARKED are just convenient rounded approximations. We DO NOT USE THE MARKED number values, the camera knows to substitute and use the actual powers of two. 1/30 is 1/32, 1/60 is 1/64, and 1/125 is 1/128 second. The markings might show three sequences, but the ...


0

The obvious bottom line is about CCD sensors. CCD sensors can be used as shutters. CCD has to be disabled each frame to transfer the image out of it anyway, so they can simply time the enabled time as a shutter. Inexpensive cameras (compacts and camcorders, and less expensive DSLR too, back in the older days) still use CCD sensors for the free shutter. ...


0

Yes it's better to take to some camera repair store. Fixing shutter speed is not easy task and may require adjusting springs tension inside the camera. If you want to know how off is your shutter speed there are shutter speed tester apps for both Android and iOS and there are actual devices that range from cheap ones $100 to couple of hundreds. Calumet used ...


1

It likely just needs a CLA - "clean, lube, adjust". At X and below, the second curtain is on a clockwork delay, and that can't tolerate a lot of dust and grit or old, broken-down lubricant. It is something you can do yourself with relatively common precision/jewellers' tools (well, except for accurately adjusting the timer spring, but if you can get within a ...


5

Yes. What you're envisioning is something that's actually used by some TTL-capable radio triggers to allow faster shutter speeds with manual flashes and studio strobes: it's called tail-sync (aka "HyperSync", "Supersync", etc.). The problem, as Loong has pointed out, is that the light/power output of the flash pulse is not even and constant during the ...


10

In principle, your rationale is correct. However, there is no usable period during which an ordinary single flash is emitting at constant power. The power of a typical on-camera flash quickly increases from zero to its maximum value in about 0.1 ms (i.e. 1/10 000th s). Then it exponentially decreases with a half-life of roughly 1 ms; i.e., it decreases to ...


1

I think a key complication with doing it this way round is going to be getting the flash to be able to synchronise with the shutter at that level of precision. Eg, what happens if there is a long sync cord, or a radio trigger? They may cause different amounts of lag (I realise that the lag with a longer sync cable will be negligible and may not make a ...



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