Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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36

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


21

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence to accurately differentiate. Most ...


18

Camera motion is usually measured in terms of angular size or arc: that is, how many degrees, minutes, seconds of arc the optical axis moves during the time the shutter is open. How much the same amount of motion affects the image is also determined by the angular size of the Field of View (FoV) yielded by a particular focal length and film/sensor size. For ...


13

f/16 will give you sharper image than f/1.4. Yes, diffraction does kick-in at f/16, but it's still not as bad as the optical flaws that are pronounced at f/1.4 in pretty much every f/1.4 lens out there. (see: tests of your particular lens, resolution charts) Also lens coma and astigmatism are worse when lens is wide open than when it's stopped-down. That's ...


12

In most scenarios the extra stop between 1/4000 and 1/8000 second will make very little difference in terms of freezing motion. 1/4000 will freeze all but the fastest objects you are likely to encounter, and even 1/2000 will freeze world class human athletes and most animals at typical shooting distances. Where the extra stop will come in handy is when you ...


8

The shutter sync is limited simply by how fast the shutter can move in the same way there is a limit to how high a car engine can rev. Increasing these limits increases the demands placed on materials, design and longevity. Another limit is the distance the shutter must travel (which is determined by the size of the sensor, a full frame shutter has to ...


7

Getting a white background (or black background, or just about any other background effect) is about lighting the background and the subject separately. So my advice is: Dump the lightbox - it simply isn't a good fit for white background photography (too small and doesn't let you light the background). Get a cheap flash like the YN-460 (about $40) + some ...


7

If so, which would be more advisable? Assuming you don't have stability or motion issues and depth of field is not a concern then f/16 would be more advisable than f/1.4 as ultra-fast lenses show several image degrading aberrations when the aperture is wide open. However f/5.6 would probably be better still, as diffraction starts to kick in past this ...


6

Since the limitation appears to be with regard to specific positions of the aperture diaphragm it is most likely a mechanical limitation of the camera's design. The limitations you have described are clearly outlined on page 49 of the Canon PowerShot G7 Advanced Camera User Guide, so this is expected normal behavior for this camera. As the focal length ...


6

Background The excellent lensrentals.com blog had an interesting article about this not so long ago. Linked in the article is an Android app to measure just how much you shake the camera while holding it. Try it out for yourself. Some of their results are (emphasis and formatting mine): What we found is actually quite interesting. First, ...


6

There is no direct relation between the two. However, there is an observation that with longer focal length you need faster shutter (keeping ISO the same) in order to avoid blur from camera shake. Quoting: The rule of thumb for a sharp picture, free from the effects of camera shake, is to use a shutter speed which is at least as fast as 1 divided by ...


6

Put it in Manual (M) mode and roll the wheel until it shows 'Bulb' on the display. Press and hold the shutter button for the desired length of time. You don't need a remote, but it helps to prevent camera shake to a great extent. P.S. The manual is your friend.


6

I'm not sure what you are hoping for. The shutter is not in the lens, but rather in the camera. A lens can't increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera itself unless it had it's own independent shutter. I'm not aware of any such lenses. Speed Boosting adapters are not used to increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera, but rather to focus ...


5

5400 is a reference to the temperature, not the amount of light. In general continuous lighting will not be as powerful as strobe lighting will be. You still need not only more light, but an additional light on the back of the box to raise the exposure of the background in relation to the product so that you can intentionally blow the white background ...


5

Style 1 looks like it's taken with a flash, but exposed for about 1-2 seconds assuming no flash (well probably -2 EV). The flash is set to fire at the start (or end) of the exposure, and the photographer then rotates the camera (around the axis of the lens) over the ~1 second exposure time. A clear image comes from the flash exposing it, and anything ...


5

In a theoretical sense, these things are perfectly interchangeable. See the second half of my answer to What is the "exposure triangle"? (after I get done ranting about the terminology). This is actually exactly the point of the "stops" system — you can think in terms of Exposure Value (measured in stops) and not need to worry about any complicated ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


4

Here are some differences that you may experience when choosing a different setting with the equivalent exposire: Exposure Theoretically, the exposure would be exactly the same. In practice, the measurements are not exactly accurate. The f/8 might be f/7.9, the ISO 200 might be ISO 190. Those small differences keeps the exposure from being exactly the ...


4

At 1/250, you are trying to exceed the x-sync speed of the 6D (which is 1/180, as you have found), which explains the black bar. Don't forget that on the 450D, as a crop-sensor camera, the shutter has less distance to travel, so doesn't need to move as fast to give the same exposure time, which explains why some full frame cameras have a slower x-sync speed ...


4

I guess you are confused with term "faster lens". It basically a high quality glass with very small f number say f/1.2. The use of this kinda aperture is in low light conditions. When you can bring down the f number to gather more light, it helps you choose a faster shutter speed, you can pick a shutter speed you camera is designed for in your case no matter ...


3

It should support the same shutter, regardless of aperture. If designed with separate shutter and iris like DSLRs. This is not the case with shutters where the aperture and the shutter is in fact the same part. So the wider it is, the longer it has to travel to open up and close. Usually referred to as diaphragm- or leaf shutters. These are typical in top ...


3

AFAIK there is no way to do that with camera settings, nor with any mainstream tethering software (You may be able to do that if you don't mind getting your hands dirty and coding something, but it would just be too much effort). If you have the resources available you can do that shooting at 1/30 or more and firing a flash at the beginning (although I ...


3

It's hard to tell what your equations are saying with all the undefined variables. However, the relationship is simple. Each f-stop change in aperture is a factor of 2 in light, so you need to adjust the exposure time by a factor of 2 to compensate. For example, f/2 and 1/100 second is the same exposure in terms of light level as f/4 and 1/25 second. ...


3

"...without motion blur" is somewhat subjective, as the acceptable amount of blur for me might be different for you. It also depends on how far your subject is from you. Because of these two factors, a specific shutter speed is not what I would recommend looking for. Instead, and since you are shooting digital - simply experiment and see what shutter speed ...


3

What I do 60-70% of the time (summary): Priority 1: Compose the image in my mind. 2: Think 'What do I want in focus, what do I want out of focus? What lens/focal length am I using?'. This drives my Aperture value. 3: 'Do I have a tripod or something still to rest the camera on?' If not don't set the shutter speed to be longer than 1/X (where X is my ...


3

There is no direct relationship between focal length and shutter speed. Focal length determines your ultimate subject magnification and field of view. Shutter speed is a facet of exposure, which is not explicitly affected by focal length in any way. Classically, the "rule of thumb" for motion-freezing shutter speed has been 1/focalLength. In this case, a ...


3

This is simple. There is none. With rare exceptions, these are independent components. The lens defines its focal-length by its physical properties and the camera defines its shutter-speed range which is a property of the shutter which could be mechanical, electrical or hybrid. The only exception is when the shutter is located inside the lens. This is ...


3

The rule isn't exact with slower shutter speeds either: 1/15, 1/8, 1/4, 1/2, etc. I think the only reason for this is that it the basic full stop series (which 1/125 is part of) has been agreed to at some point as a standard so that exposure calculation is easier when working together with the full stop aperture series. I don't think the small "errors" ...


3

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.



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