Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


26

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


26

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 secondes (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


24

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


24

The blur is caused by the people moving while you were taking the photograph with a slow shutter. Honestly, I think it improves this particular photo a lot: it shows that the people are dancing, rather than just standing in weird positions. If you want to, the only way to avoid it is to use a faster shutter speed. This necessarily involves compromises. If ...


22

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


20

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


14

Apart from using an ND filter, you might be able to achieve the desired effect by taking multiple photos and then blending them in post processing. Either an automatic blend with "ghost removal" might work, or layering the images and manually masking/unmasking selectively (in effect "painting out" the people). All of this pretty much requires a tripod for ...


14

The Factors There is an equation, and by convention, it's set up to be really simple. There are basically five factors to consider together: Aperture — the size of the opening which lets light in, Shutter Duration (or shutter speed) — the amount of time the sensor (or film) gets that light, Sensitivity (or ISO, or sometimes "film speed") — how quickly the ...


13

Honestly, the biggest problem I see in your picture is not the blur, but the badly clipped highlights. Next time, try shooting at, say, -1 EV (which will also reduce the exposure time, and thus the blur, a bit) and adjusting the exposure afterwards to get softer highlights. This does increase noise in the shadows a bit, as if you were using a higher ISO ...


11

Take multiple photos, including the background without the subject present. Expose differently to fit each element. Combine in Photoshop. You can also spend more time playing with different settings when the foreground subject is not present, without worrying about keeping her interested. With a tripod and near-perfect alignment, blending layers is easy. ...


9

Simple: the flash duration is very short. A full-powered flash is usually around ¹⁄₂₀₀th of a second, and if less than full power is used, it can be in the ¹⁄₁₀₀₀₀th range. If this flash is the only significant contributor of light in the image (and indoors, it's easy for that to be the case), the rest of the time the shutter is open just doesn't matter. ...


8

By a zoom lens I assume you mean a telephoto (long focal length) lens, as zoom implies a variable focal length. There are no f/1.4 zooms and f/2.0 zooms are incredibly rare. In any case you are being mislead by the blurred background into thinking this was shot with a fast f/1.4 - f/2.0 lens. Background blur is actually more closely related to the size of ...


8

No. If you have a faster shutter speed, you must be either increasing the aperture or the ISO to compensate. Both of those have effects on your photos, which may or may not be what you want: for example you may not want to shoot with your lens wide open, either because you want a greater depth of field or because you know your lens isn't sharp wide open.


8

No, it is not normal. One thing that Manual mode is used for is to take multiple photographs with the same exposure parameters which is very useful in many situations. There are a few cases where it may happen though. If you are bracketing for exposure, then one of the exposure-parameters, usually shutter-speed, is changed between frames until the bracket is ...


7

Just to add a bit of links to the other (good) answers, if you do not want to use a ND filter, you can use multiple exposure and use an averaging method to simulate a long exposure --- basically, 20 exposures at 1/10 of seconds will be more or less equivalent to a 2 seconds exposures, or use a median filter, which can even be better --- in the right ...


7

I bet you have enabled safety shift mode, an option which overrides your setting in Tv and Av modes if the result, in combination with ISO and the automatically adjusted parameter, would be severely underexposed or overexposed. You should be able to disable this; check the camera's manual for how to do it on your particular model. On the Canon 6D, it's in ...


6

In most of old cameras (film) people are concerned about shutter speed accuracy at all speeds Shutter speed has a direct bearing on exposure. With digital cameras, you find out more or less immediately if you've dialed in the exposure correctly and you can take steps to compensate. With film, you don't get that feedback with film until hours, days, or ...


6

Your camera saves this information, which we call "metadata" (because it is data about the data captured in the photo itself — one level beyond, or meta), in every file. There are many utilities which can read and display this. I'm not aware of any software designed for photography which doesn't — that'd include Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Picassa, and ...


6

You should base your decisions for shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, on your artistic needs, so that you achieve a correct exposure, the amount of bokeh/sharpness you desire, and low noise. See What is the "exposure triangle"? A high shutter speed will help to reduce shake, but it makes no difference after a certain point (typically cited as ...


6

You are seeing the scanning of the screen. Try shooting an airplane propeller next! The exposure is made with a travelling slit so different parts of the image are exposed at different times and the movement causes artefacts. Even though the shutter is not mechanical, the reset and readout has the same effect, but more complex: while a focal plane shutter ...


6

Hopefully you are aware of the relationship between the three main controls that affect exposure: Aperture, Shutter speed and ISO. In this case you've set an aperture of F/2. You have left the decision of shutter speed and ISO to the camera (by selecting Aperture Priority mode, and having Auto ISO on). It's a low light scene, so the camera doesn't have ...


6

The total exposure you get is governed by four factors: The brightness of the scene. How sensitive the sensor is. How long the scene light is projected onto the sensor. How concentrated the light from the scene is on the sensor. The last three are tradeoffs we get to control in the camera, and together are often termed the "exposure" that was used to ...


6

That is quite common in EXIF data but the values are usually closer. It is possible the EXIF data for that photo is telling us a lens with a maximum aperture of f/1.0 was used at f/2.8 and the shutter speed was set to 1/16 and that resulted in an actual exposure time of 1/11. Here is an example where the shutter speed and aperture selected were 1/500 and ...


5

You are totally right with your assumption of the ISO it would indeed by ISO 1600 and 800. 2/100 if you use the standard laws of mathematics and fractions this would become 1/50. Hence 2/100 = 1/50, 10/1000 = 1/100 and so on. This incorrect EXIF data can be caused by the processing of the image. In some cases programs will alter the EXIF to make it ...


5

In each of the 4 photos, the amount of sky and foreground has changed. The sky is very bright and everything else is much darker. This makes for a very challenging exposure for any camera. The camera metering had to decide between the light and dark areas and come up with a guess as to what the correct exposure should be. Your camera actually did a very ...


5

I don't want to use flash Why not ? It's what flash is for. Get a good external flash and learn to love it. Learn to bounce light from the ceiling or using a bounce card or similar. Easy technique, great results. I would, however, agree that blur is useful in these shots sometimes. There's no other way to give a sense of motion. I disagree with ...


5

If you think of a camera as simply a light collector or photon counter and ignore actually taking a picture of a scene, there is a very simple relationship between ISO, aperture, and shutter speed: Total light collected is proportional to ISO × aperture × shutter speed × available light in the scene For the remainder of this ...


4

Once you take a photo, you can view Photo Information by clicking the Play button on the back of your D3200 and clicking the Arrow either up or down. More information can be found on page 98 of your manual. Aperture, Shutter speed, ISO, Focal Length, Focus Mode, Flash Mode, White Balance, and much more is all available via this menu.



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