It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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26

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


23

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


13

f/16 will give you sharper image than f/1.4. Yes, diffraction does kick-in at f/16, but it's still not as bad as the optical flaws that are pronounced at f/1.4 in pretty much every f/1.4 lens out there. (see: tests of your particular lens, resolution charts) Also lens coma and astigmatism are worse when lens is wide open than when it's stopped-down. That's ...


12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


11

Your camera is limiting your shutter speed to the 60D's maximum sync speed. If you were to use a faster shutter speed, you'd have black bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame, because the shutter curtains would be covering part of the sensor when the flash burst goes off. The only way to use a faster shutter speed than 1/250s with flash it to use ...


10

This is actually a characteristic of the leaf shutter used in Fuji's X10/X20/X30 and X100 cameras. The leaf shutter can only travel so quickly. The wider the aperture is open, the slower the shutter speed has to be to accommodate the operation speed of the leaf shutter. It's a mechanical limit. In M and shutter priority modes, Fuji is allowing the faster ...


10

In principle, your rationale is correct. However, there is no usable period during which an ordinary single flash is emitting at constant power. The power of a typical on-camera flash quickly increases from zero to its maximum value in about 0.1 ms (i.e. 1/10 000th s). Then it exponentially decreases with a half-life of roughly 1 ms; i.e., it decreases to ...


10

Take multiple photos, including the background without the subject present. Expose differently to fit each element. Combine in Photoshop. You can also spend more time playing with different settings when the foreground subject is not present, without worrying about keeping her interested. With a tripod and near-perfect alignment, blending layers is easy. ...


9

So, it helps to start with knowing what a "stop" means. See What is one "stop"?, but, fundamentally, each stop is a doubling or halving of the exposure. So, given two shutter durations, you can find the number of stops between them by calculating the binary logorithm (log₂) of each, and subtracting. (If you don't remember your elementary school ...


7

If so, which would be more advisable? Assuming you don't have stability or motion issues and depth of field is not a concern then f/16 would be more advisable than f/1.4 as ultra-fast lenses show several image degrading aberrations when the aperture is wide open. However f/5.6 would probably be better still, as diffraction starts to kick in past this ...


7

Put it in Manual (M) mode and roll the wheel until it shows 'Bulb' on the display. Press and hold the shutter button for the desired length of time. You don't need a remote, but it helps to prevent camera shake to a great extent. P.S. The manual is your friend.


6

Digital cameras do have an ISO rating. In fact most of them have many ISO sensitivities at which they can shoot. There are even third party sites that measure how accurate those sensitivity settings are in a lab. Here, for example, are the results for selected versus actual ISO for three of the top cameras currently on the market. (Click "Measurements-->ISO ...


6

I'm not sure what you are hoping for. The shutter is not in the lens, but rather in the camera. A lens can't increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera itself unless it had it's own independent shutter. I'm not aware of any such lenses. Speed Boosting adapters are not used to increase the maximum shutter speed of the camera, but rather to focus ...


6

In most of old cameras (film) people are concerned about shutter speed accuracy at all speeds Shutter speed has a direct bearing on exposure. With digital cameras, you find out more or less immediately if you've dialed in the exposure correctly and you can take steps to compensate. With film, you don't get that feedback with film until hours, days, or ...


5

No, there's no way to deduce the max shutter speed. It's typically listed in the same specs where you'd find the kind of information you've listed, in fact.


5

Yes. What you're envisioning is something that's actually used by some TTL-capable radio triggers to allow faster shutter speeds with manual flashes and studio strobes: it's called tail-sync (aka "HyperSync", "Supersync", etc.). The problem, as Loong has pointed out, is that the light/power output of the flash pulse is not even and constant during the ...


5

Your camera saves this information, which we call "metadata" (because it is data about the data captured in the photo itself — one level beyond, or meta), in every file. There are many utilities which can read and display this. I'm not aware of any software designed for photography which doesn't — that'd include Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, Picassa, and ...


4

At 1/250, you are trying to exceed the x-sync speed of the 6D (which is 1/180, as you have found), which explains the black bar. Don't forget that on the 450D, as a crop-sensor camera, the shutter has less distance to travel, so doesn't need to move as fast to give the same exposure time, which explains why some full frame cameras have a slower x-sync speed ...


4

I guess you are confused with term "faster lens". It basically a high quality glass with very small f number say f/1.2. The use of this kinda aperture is in low light conditions. When you can bring down the f number to gather more light, it helps you choose a faster shutter speed, you can pick a shutter speed you camera is designed for in your case no matter ...


4

The main way you balance out light against your needs for the image is the "exposure triangle" of the three main settings: ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. You have to choose your priorities: noise (ISO), depth of field (aperture), or the possibility of blur (shutter speed). Outside of these three settings, however, you do have two other options. You can ...


3

Here are some options: Find some shade If there's too much light for your style you need a location with less light :-) in mid-day sunlight you may need something pretty big to block enough light but still it's an easy option Shoot at a better time of day At early morning and late evening there's less light and you'll be able to get the aperture/shutter ...


3

On the D610, I prefer using the 'Remote Shutter Delay' set to 3s than the Mirror Lock-Up. These two essentially do the same thing but need only one press for the former. This makes it possible to capture sharp long exposures even without a wireless remote. It works with it too though. Having the remote opens you the option to do much longer BULB exposures ...


3

The distance of the objects is not a factor on your decision on the shutter speed. Their relative movement velocity related to the camera as well as your composition intentions and the available light is what really matters. The fact that you ask the question hints that you don't know about the artistic differences between a large aperture and a small one ...


3

Assuming you are using a tripod, the shutter speed will make little difference in itself. If you are hand-holding, a faster shutter speed will help to eliminate shake. You also have the consideration of any moving objects in the scene, like trees, water, or clouds - a slower shutter speed will blur them. However, image quality is rarely at its best at ...


3

You can use a wired remote release that has a built in intervalometer, such as this fairly inexpensive one or this one. Regardless of the brand name stamped on them, they all seem to be made identically. You then set the camera to Bulb and let the timer in the remote open and close the shutter.


3

While you can use the Bulb mode and press the shutter release button, the button presses are likely to cause unwanted camera shake, even on the sturdiest tripod. I use and recommend an intervalometer such as this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA04D09G0109 Notice that the shutter release time can be set for any time up to 99 hours, 59 ...


3

Image Stabilization (IS). The EF 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS has it, the EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 doesn't. IS lets you shoot at a slower shutter speed before camera shake becomes an issue. If you are shooting at shutter speeds fast enough that camera movement is not an issue for you, then IS has very little to no effect on your image. Also, IS will not help you if your ...


3

(I think) Every digital photo has aditional data stored on it besides the image itself. That is called Exif data (Exchangeable image file format). A Dslr camera can shoot to a raw or jpg image file, and both formats include this data. Smartphones and compact cameras most likely shoot only in jpg, but it includes this information too. When you manipulate ...


3

Once you take a photo, you can view Photo Information by clicking the Play button on the back of your D3200 and clicking the Arrow either up or down. More information can be found on page 98 of your manual. Aperture, Shutter speed, ISO, Focal Length, Focus Mode, Flash Mode, White Balance, and much more is all available via this menu.


3

One need not be concerned with precise shutter speed unless the camera is being used for measurement, e.g. length of a streak image, or to avoid illumination flicker in video. The electronic shutter should be quite accurate. However, for certain sensors and shutter speeds, there may be a rolling shutter effect when the whole sensor is not read ...



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