Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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18

Camera motion is usually measured in terms of angular size or arc: that is, how many degrees, minutes, seconds of arc the optical axis moves during the time the shutter is open. How much the same amount of motion affects the image is also determined by the angular size of the Field of View (FoV) yielded by a particular focal length and film/sensor size. For ...


9

If you are not limiting the question to mechanical shutter, the fastest shutter speed I ever saw in a machine vision camera was 1 micro second, taking pictures at 775.000 frames/s. The advantage is to analyse high speed actions, like grains flying fast in during processing, studying physics, tennis balls hitting rackets, other types of impact. To achive ...


8

The shutter sync is limited simply by how fast the shutter can move in the same way there is a limit to how high a car engine can rev. Increasing these limits increases the demands placed on materials, design and longevity. Another limit is the distance the shutter must travel (which is determined by the size of the sensor, a full frame shutter has to ...


7

Getting a white background (or black background, or just about any other background effect) is about lighting the background and the subject separately. So my advice is: Dump the lightbox - it simply isn't a good fit for white background photography (too small and doesn't let you light the background). Get a cheap flash like the YN-460 (about $40) + some ...


6

Background The excellent lensrentals.com blog had an interesting article about this not so long ago. Linked in the article is an Android app to measure just how much you shake the camera while holding it. Try it out for yourself. Some of their results are (emphasis and formatting mine): What we found is actually quite interesting. First, ...


6

In most scenarios the extra stop between 1/4000 and 1/8000 second will make very little difference in terms of freezing motion. 1/4000 will freeze all but the fastest objects you are likely to encounter, and even 1/2000 will freeze world class human athletes and most animals at typical shooting distances. Where the extra stop will come in handy is when you ...


6

Since the limitation appears to be with regard to specific positions of the aperture diaphragm it is most likely a mechanical limitation of the camera's design. The limitations you have described are clearly outlined on page 49 of the Canon PowerShot G7 Advanced Camera User Guide, so this is expected normal behavior for this camera. As the focal length ...


6

There is no direct relation between the two. However, there is an observation that with longer focal length you need faster shutter (keeping ISO the same) in order to avoid blur from camera shake. Quoting: The rule of thumb for a sharp picture, free from the effects of camera shake, is to use a shutter speed which is at least as fast as 1 divided by ...


5

Why 8s or 30s? Longer exposure allow you to: get more light to reach the captor (night, etc) have nice blurry effects (waterfalls, etc) (in that case, usually you need a dark ND filter to compensate, so that during that long exposure you don't overexpose). For exemple: photograph of buildings, using the maximum ND filter available, will make people/cars ...


5

It, of course, depends. You want to change that which affects the photograph negatively the least. If you are shooting scenery, you have a decent latitude in terms of aperture. You ideally want to be above f/8 and can easily go as far as f/22 (although you may lose sharpness after f/16). You have even greater latitude in terms of shutter speed, anywhere ...


5

There is no fastest speed shutter. The fastest theoretically possible would be the time it takes for however many photons you want to capture to hit the sensor. The advantage is that it stops motion. You can see what happened during a very small moment in time and thus a very fast action. The trick is to have sufficient light though. You need sufficient ...


5

5400 is a reference to the temperature, not the amount of light. In general continuous lighting will not be as powerful as strobe lighting will be. You still need not only more light, but an additional light on the back of the box to raise the exposure of the background in relation to the product so that you can intentionally blow the white background ...


5

Style 1 looks like it's taken with a flash, but exposed for about 1-2 seconds assuming no flash (well probably -2 EV). The flash is set to fire at the start (or end) of the exposure, and the photographer then rotates the camera (around the axis of the lens) over the ~1 second exposure time. A clear image comes from the flash exposing it, and anything ...


4

With the Canon EOS 5D mark II, the best way to accomplish what you want is to set the exposure mode to Tv, the shutter speed to the desired setting (i.e. 1/125 sec.), and the ISO to Auto. As long as the light is fairly dim, the camera will first open the aperture to the lens' maximum and then start raising the ISO. This method will only work if you are happy ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


3

The way to capture fast moving subjects like your daughter is to use a shorter shutter speed. No big surprise there. The way to achieve a faster shutter speed, though is often misunderstood. The camera is only part of the equation. The speed of the lens is the other part. Before you decide to buy an entirely different camera, I would encourage you to try ...


3

It's hard to tell what your equations are saying with all the undefined variables. However, the relationship is simple. Each f-stop change in aperture is a factor of 2 in light, so you need to adjust the exposure time by a factor of 2 to compensate. For example, f/2 and 1/100 second is the same exposure in terms of light level as f/4 and 1/25 second. ...


3

AFAIK there is no way to do that with camera settings, nor with any mainstream tethering software (You may be able to do that if you don't mind getting your hands dirty and coding something, but it would just be too much effort). If you have the resources available you can do that shooting at 1/30 or more and firing a flash at the beginning (although I ...


3

It should support the same shutter, regardless of aperture. If designed with separate shutter and iris like DSLRs. This is not the case with shutters where the aperture and the shutter is in fact the same part. So the wider it is, the longer it has to travel to open up and close. Usually referred to as diaphragm- or leaf shutters. These are typical in top ...


3

"...without motion blur" is somewhat subjective, as the acceptable amount of blur for me might be different for you. It also depends on how far your subject is from you. Because of these two factors, a specific shutter speed is not what I would recommend looking for. Instead, and since you are shooting digital - simply experiment and see what shutter speed ...


3

What I do 60-70% of the time (summary): Priority 1: Compose the image in my mind. 2: Think 'What do I want in focus, what do I want out of focus? What lens/focal length am I using?'. This drives my Aperture value. 3: 'Do I have a tripod or something still to rest the camera on?' If not don't set the shutter speed to be longer than 1/X (where X is my ...


3

There is no direct relationship between focal length and shutter speed. Focal length determines your ultimate subject magnification and field of view. Shutter speed is a facet of exposure, which is not explicitly affected by focal length in any way. Classically, the "rule of thumb" for motion-freezing shutter speed has been 1/focalLength. In this case, a ...


3

This is simple. There is none. With rare exceptions, these are independent components. The lens defines its focal-length by its physical properties and the camera defines its shutter-speed range which is a property of the shutter which could be mechanical, electrical or hybrid. The only exception is when the shutter is located inside the lens. This is ...


2

Cameras without mirrors, and especially without focal-plane shutters, are silent. as are cameras with leaf shutters like the FUJI X100, The Sony RX10, the Canon GX etc. When cameras get interchangeable lenses, they must have a focal plane shutter. Some 4/3 cameras like two or three models of the high-priced Panasonics, especially the GX7, can use an ...


2

I was able to snap some pictures early in the morning during a recent blizzard. I believe it depends on what effect you are after. Sometimes a longer focal length, focused on the background can make for some interesting, surrealistic effects with the up close snowflakes. A smaller aperture will show the shape of the blades. A larger aperture will turn them ...


2

What you are referring to is shutter-speed. It can range from fractions of a second to hours. Most large-sensor cameras offer a range from around 1/4000s to 30s. The longer the time, the more light gets in. At some point, usually over a second or so, people call it a long exposure. There is no point at which it becomes long but there is a point at which you ...


2

You'll want to use longer exposures at night in conjunction with a tripod. It will help you capture more of what little light is available and give you clearer pictures. If you use it during the day, you'll see blur effects for things in motion. The longer the exposure, the longer the blur "streak." I can't think of anything I'd use a 30s shutter speed for ...


2

My main recommendation would be to get a camera that supports a decent flash. If your getting blurry images due to the shutter being open too long then you are correct that you need to get the shutter speed faster. This either means a faster lens (which also makes depth of field shallower and harder to get good focus on a moving child, though if you stick ...


2

Once you get into the Macro range, a lot of the bets are off for more conventional rules of thumb. Because your subject is so close, the depth of field (DoF) is razor thin at wider apertures. Even when stopped down to f/8 or so there will still be plenty of bokeh in the background for anything that is any distance at all behind your subject. With the ...



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