Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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69

If you want them to stand out against the background, you need to use a flash. On-axis will generally reflect the most light off the snowflakes to the camera and have them stand out more. I used a cheap eBay plastic cover with a space for the flash for the picture below. Otherwise, a fast shutter speed may make them visible, but it depends on the background ...


62

Fluorescent lights can flicker at twice the frequency of the current feeding them, which implies an entire cycle of the flicker will take between 1/100 and 1/120 second. During each cycle the light's intensity and its color temperature can change. Thus, if you're using a shutter speed of 1/100 second or faster, you might observe exactly these phenomena: ...


42

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


30

Any speed will give you something. It will render the photo differently. So, the question should not be how slow can I take the photo? but how slow do I want to take the photo? Some ideas: If you want to freeze the sweat flying off the boxer's face when he takes a hit, I suggest 1/2000s or faster. If you want to freeze the boxer's body and leave the ...


27

Noise is better than blur (and much less of a problem than you might think from reading the internet), so don't hesitate to vigorously boost ISO. Underexposing won't help; it's basically the same as increasing ISO w.r.t. noise. The only time to do this is when you've already maxed out the ISO adjustment. Consider a "fast fifty" - you can get a 50mm f/1.4 ...


27

Get a flash! Seriously, even the small external flashes make a huge difference. You can also (at least on my Nikon SB-400) direct the flash at the ceiling, which both annoys people less and also nearly always eliminates red-eye.


27

I think there a several reasons that together make sense to limit the shutter speed at about 30 seconds. At exposures requiring more than 30 seconds, light is so weak your TTL meter will not be able to measure it correctly. 30 seconds is already longer than you'd ever need for any "normal" night scene. In a digital camera, sensor heat starts to build up ...


26

The bulb mode is simply a mode where you control the exposure time by holding down the shutter release button. The name comes from the time when the shutter was controlled by a rubber bulb at the end of a hose. You compressed the bulb to open the shutter, and it would stay open as long as you held the bulb compressed. Bulb mode is mostly used when you want ...


26

Use the ambient light to illuminate the waterfall. Use a fairly powerful flash to illuminate your human subject. The quick duration of the flash will freeze her, especially if she remains fairly still over the long exposure. The narrow aperture you will need to properly expose with the flash will also give better depth of field so that the water fall is also ...


26

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture ...


25

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence to accurately differentiate. Most ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 secondes (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


24

Shutters are probably more accurate/reliable now, but more importantly with digital photography you get instant feedback so you can tell right away if there are any exposure problems, you're not going to ruin several rolls of film before you find out. I had a 1DsII that had a shutter which suddenly became unreliable at anything faster than 1/500s, I ...


24

The blur is caused by the people moving while you were taking the photograph with a slow shutter. Honestly, I think it improves this particular photo a lot: it shows that the people are dancing, rather than just standing in weird positions. If you want to, the only way to avoid it is to use a faster shutter speed. This necessarily involves compromises. If ...


22

General Rule The general rule of thumb for 35mm (full frame) has been the reciprocal of the focal length. This means that for a 50mm lens, the minimum shutter speed when hand-holding is 1/50 sec. 1/(focal length) = 1/50 Since this is usually not an option, 1/60 sec is the next option. Since the move to digital and multiple sensor sizes, the generally ...


22

Sounds nice but apparently there are currently some technical limitations: An electronic shutter requires the sensor to be equipped with what is commonly called "snap shutter" circuitry. Basically, this is a second set of diodes, as big as the light gathering photodiodes, but shielded under a dark cover, and some additional switches. To shoot, the ...


22

Fluorescent lights are terrible news for photography, and this is just one of the reasons! They give out light which is missing a big chunk of the red spectrum, which can make skin tones look greenish and unhealthy, they are usually different colours from each other even if the tubes are the same type, and they change colour during the power cycle! Your ...


22

As was said, the mechanical shutter has speed limitations. As to the slit, try to imagine without it. Suppose the shutter opens by moving from top to bottom of frame. And then of course, it has to close from bottom to top. So it is open longer on the top side than on the bottom side, which is uneven exposure. Modern fast curtains might move about 7 ...


20

The most common approach to taking great flowing water pictures is to use a long exposure. This allows the "soft, dreamy flow" of water to be captured as you have probably seen in many photos. Achieving a long exposure may require extra equipment, depending on how the scene is lit. Long Exposures To achieve a long exposure, you will need to reduce the ...


20

While you can get some freezing with speeds around 1/300 (see the first photo below), I would recommend going with faster shutter speeds if you want to take shots of water drops falling or moving away from wet dogs. One thing to keep in mind is that most flashes have a limit on their sync speed, which means that the use of flash will limit your fastest ...


20

Here's a really good case for the application of Okham's Razor. The simplest explanation is that the image was shot outdoors, under the midday sun. The blur was not added in post but is the result of the close shooting distance and relatively wide aperture of f/4. The fast shutter speed was required otherwise the shot would have been overexposed due to the ...


20

Thought experiment time. Assume we'd like a minimum exposure of 1/2000 of a second (500 microseconds) on a 35mm full frame camera. We have a single 'shutter' to move out of the way, and back. We'll tolerate one side of the picture being 10% more exposed than the other, so that means we allow 50μs to move the shutter back and forth. So the shutter has to ...


19

There are probably more formal answers, but for me it boils down to what kind of shot I am looking for. If I want to register something in time (either frozen or moving) then shutter speed is more important than aperture. If I want to register something in space (meaning a deeper or shallower area in focus) then aperture is more important than shutter ...


19

Those listed are full stops. Most cameras allow you to increment shutter speed and aperture in half-stops or one-third stops, and you can select intermediate values manually. If you have the camera set to half-stops, then you'll have 1/350 between 1/250 and 1/500. If you have 1/3 stop increments set, you'll have 1/320 and 1/400 To work these out, a ...


18

Shutter priority (Tv) gets used for a couple good reasons You want to control the shutter speed (obviously) and don't care about the aperture. You'd use this to have creative control over the shutter speed which mostly involves motion blur. Some techniques that use this are 'dragging the shutter' with flash to create motion streaks and a final 'flash' to ...


18

Shooting manual mode doesn't make you a better photographer, understanding what all the settings effectively do will. Your camera has three basic settings: Aperture: Use this to control depth of field (DoF). This is usually the most important setting to most photographers, as it influences both subject matter and composition. You're not going to be taking ...


18

1/250 of a second is the maximum flash sync speed on Nikon D7000. This is the fastest shutter speed where sensor is fully exposed at a time. On faster shutter speeds, second shutter curtain starts moving before the first curtain has fully opened and there would be no moment where the flash could illuminate whole scene captured by sensor. This speed is ...


18

The camera is likely setting the shutter speed to match the sync speed of the flash. If it was set any faster, you would get black bands of underexposure across your shots, or at the fastest speeds a completely black shot. This is because the shutters would have finished moving to some degree before the flash completed its fire.



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