Serene Life

by garik

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61

If you want them to stand out against the background, you need to use a flash. On-axis will generally reflect the most light off the snowflakes to the camera and have them stand out more. I used a cheap eBay plastic cover with a space for the flash for the picture below. Otherwise, a fast shutter speed may make them visible, but it depends on the background ...


59

Fluorescent lights can flicker at twice the frequency of the current feeding them, which implies an entire cycle of the flicker will take between 1/100 and 1/120 second. During each cycle the light's intensity and its color temperature can change. Thus, if you're using a shutter speed of 1/100 second or faster, you might observe exactly these phenomena: ...


37

Actually 1/125 is half of 1/60, ±0.06 f-stop. It should be obvious by looking at shutter speeds that they were chosen to be the reciprocal of nice round numbers. Start with 1 second and keep dividing it by 2. Note that you missed the discrepancy between 1/16 s and 1/15 s. If you kept going in strict mathematical multiples of 2, then 1/60 s should ...


30

Any speed will give you something. It will render the photo differently. So, the question should not be how slow can I take the photo? but how slow do I want to take the photo? Some ideas: If you want to freeze the sweat flying off the boxer's face when he takes a hit, I suggest 1/2000s or faster. If you want to freeze the boxer's body and leave the ...


26

I think there a several reasons that together make sense to limit the shutter speed at about 30 seconds. At exposures requiring more than 30 seconds, light is so weak your TTL meter will not be able to measure it correctly. 30 seconds is already longer than you'd ever need for any "normal" night scene. In a digital camera, sensor heat starts to build up ...


25

Noise is better than blur (and much less of a problem than you might think from reading the internet), so don't hesitate to vigorously boost ISO. Underexposing won't help; it's basically the same as increasing ISO w.r.t. noise. The only time to do this is when you've already maxed out the ISO adjustment. Consider a "fast fifty" - you can get a 50mm f/1.4 ...


24

Get a flash! Seriously, even the small external flashes make a huge difference. You can also (at least on my Nikon SB-400) direct the flash at the ceiling, which both annoys people less and also nearly always eliminates red-eye.


23

The bulb mode is simply a mode where you control the exposure time by holding down the shutter release button. The name comes from the time when the shutter was controlled by a rubber bulb at the end of a hose. You compressed the bulb to open the shutter, and it would stay open as long as you held the bulb compressed. Bulb mode is mostly used when you want ...


22

General Rule The general rule of thumb for 35mm (full frame) has been the reciprocal of the focal length. This means that for a 50mm lens, the minimum shutter speed when hand-holding is 1/50 sec. 1/(focal length) = 1/50 Since this is usually not an option, 1/60 sec is the next option. Since the move to digital and multiple sensor sizes, the generally ...


22

Fluorescent lights are terrible news for photography, and this is just one of the reasons! They give out light which is missing a big chunk of the red spectrum, which can make skin tones look greenish and unhealthy, they are usually different colours from each other even if the tubes are the same type, and they change colour during the power cycle! Your ...


21

The difference between the "actual" shutter speeds at powers of 2 (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/128, 1/256, 1/512, 1/1024, etc.) and the rounded numbers we use (1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, etc.) is so trivial as to be beyond the limits of the vast majority of cameras in existence to accurately differentiate. Most ...


20

Here's a really good case for the application of Okham's Razor. The simplest explanation is that the image was shot outdoors, under the midday sun. The blur was not added in post but is the result of the close shooting distance and relatively wide aperture of f/4. The fast shutter speed was required otherwise the shot would have been overexposed due to the ...


19

Sounds nice but apparently there are currently some technical limitations: An electronic shutter requires the sensor to be equipped with what is commonly called "snap shutter" circuitry. Basically, this is a second set of diodes, as big as the light gathering photodiodes, but shielded under a dark cover, and some additional switches. To shoot, the ...


19

The most common approach to taking great flowing water pictures is to use a long exposure. This allows the "soft, dreamy flow" of water to be captured as you have probably seen in many photos. Achieving a long exposure may require extra equipment, depending on how the scene is lit. Long Exposures To achieve a long exposure, you will need to reduce the ...


19

While you can get some freezing with speeds around 1/300 (see the first photo below), I would recommend going with faster shutter speeds if you want to take shots of water drops falling or moving away from wet dogs. One thing to keep in mind is that most flashes have a limit on their sync speed, which means that the use of flash will limit your fastest ...


19

Those listed are full stops. Most cameras allow you to increment shutter speed and aperture in half-stops or one-third stops, and you can select intermediate values manually. If you have the camera set to half-stops, then you'll have 1/350 between 1/250 and 1/500. If you have 1/3 stop increments set, you'll have 1/320 and 1/400 To work these out, a ...


18

Shutter priority (Tv) gets used for a couple good reasons You want to control the shutter speed (obviously) and don't care about the aperture. You'd use this to have creative control over the shutter speed which mostly involves motion blur. Some techniques that use this are 'dragging the shutter' with flash to create motion streaks and a final 'flash' to ...


18

There are probably more formal answers, but for me it boils down to what kind of shot I am looking for. If I want to register something in time (either frozen or moving) then shutter speed is more important than aperture. If I want to register something in space (meaning a deeper or shallower area in focus) then aperture is more important than shutter ...


18

Shooting manual mode doesn't make you a better photographer, understanding what all the settings effectively do will. Your camera has three basic settings: Aperture: Use this to control depth of field (DoF). This is usually the most important setting to most photographers, as it influences both subject matter and composition. You're not going to be taking ...


18

Camera motion is usually measured in terms of angular size or arc: that is, how many degrees, minutes, seconds of arc the optical axis moves during the time the shutter is open. How much the same amount of motion affects the image is also determined by the angular size of the Field of View (FoV) yielded by a particular focal length and film/sensor size. For ...


17

The most obvious change that images shot with different focal length while keeping the main subject size intact will show is perspective. By using a longer focal length (and, by necessity, increasing the distance between the camera and the main subject), you will get a more "compact" perspective, with the background appearing to be closer to the subject than ...


17

The camera is likely setting the shutter speed to match the sync speed of the flash. If it was set any faster, you would get black bands of underexposure across your shots, or at the fastest speeds a completely black shot. This is because the shutters would have finished moving to some degree before the flash completed its fire.


15

Some good readin' here. Some key notes... Cameras, typically smaller point-and-shoot cameras, that use no mechanical shutters typically use an interline transfer sensor. An interline transfer sensor dedicates a portion of each pixel to store the charge for that pixel. The added electronics necessary to be able to store the charge for ...


15

The term "exposure" is used for a number of different but related things in photography. I can see how this might be confusing. Here are five different ways in which it is used: The combination of all factors which make a photograph have a certain overall brightness. The key factors are shutter speed, lens aperture, and sensor or film sensitivity (a.k.a. ...


14

You can determine the minimum shutter speed to avoid camera shake by 1) applying the following approximate rules of thumb. (See Wikipedia article - rule of thumb) 2) or carrying out careful measurements, as I did. 1) The rules of thumb a) With NO image stabilisation The approximate rules of thumb are: Full frame cameras : min shutter speed = ...


14

Okay, mine is not a technical answer, but I think it has some merit that the technical answers lack: empiricism. Try using different speeds and see what you can hand-hold. For each lens (and zoom setting, if applicable), handhold the camera while on shutter priority,and see what the slowest shutter speed YOU can use is without shaking the camera. Different ...


14

First off, using any on-camera popup flash is probably not going to give you a "natural" look. You'll need to either use natural light or move your flash off camera (which I don't believe your camera supports). The popup flash (I'm assuming thats what you mean with just "flash") is on the same axis as your lens and generally doesn't produce "natural" ...


14

Most DSLRs let you choose shutter speed and aperture at 1/3 of a stop difference (3 clicks of the dial to double or halve the amount of light), I'm not a camera designer but I would guess that since 1/3 of a stop is a small difference being able to set exact shutter speed isn't worth the extra electronics and software to support it. For aperture also add to ...


13

When you set a shutter speed, the camera will increase and decrease the aperture to match the desired shutter speed. If your aperture is maxed out on either end, it'll over/under expose the image. There are a few newer cameras that have an auto-ISO feature, which will attempt to expand the range, but without knowing what kind of camera you have, I can't tell ...



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