Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Hot answers tagged

35

Tv stands for "Time value". Similarly Av stands for "Aperture value". Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shutter_priority


26

It depends on what you mean by "highest". If you have enough light, then the first thing you should do is to reduce the ISO setting to the minimum, so that you can get as much light as possible on the sensor1. Lower ISO means less noise, more dynamics. If there is still enough light, then close the diaphragm a bit compared to its maximum possible aperture (...


16

They allow you to make different creative decisions. Take Av (aperture mode), if you are creating a portrait, you will likely want a large aperture for a flattering shallow depth of field, so maybe you set it to f2.8 and let the camera figure out the best shutter speed. However, if you want to create a landscape, you want most of the image in focus, so you ...


13

What you are going wrong is not giving the camera enough latitude. You fixed the aperture and ISO, so all the camera can do is set the shutter-speed and flash power. It must be not as low-light as you think because most often you would get an under-exposed image doing what you are doing. The camera has a shutter-speed range it can use with the flash. The ...


11

Correct. As a matter of fact, on most cameras Program Shift is the same too by your logic. These modes, including Program, are designed to give you the same exposure which is why the results are the same since Aperture and Shutter-Speed are inversely related given a fixed ISO. The difference is what you decide on. Only you can decide if you would like a ...


8

Look at your exposure meter. Your gear is only capable of so much and in the Av/Tv/P modes it will attempt to use your settings (such as your specified shutter speed), and adjust the other settings to get the right exposure. If you adjust a setting too far then it won't be able to keep up. You should see your meter and/or shutter/aperture settings (whichever ...


8

No. If you have a faster shutter speed, you must be either increasing the aperture or the ISO to compensate. Both of those have effects on your photos, which may or may not be what you want: for example you may not want to shoot with your lens wide open, either because you want a greater depth of field or because you know your lens isn't sharp wide open.


7

I bet you have enabled safety shift mode, an option which overrides your setting in Tv and Av modes if the result, in combination with ISO and the automatically adjusted parameter, would be severely underexposed or overexposed. You should be able to disable this; check the camera's manual for how to do it on your particular model. On the Canon 6D, it's in ...


6

First, I don't know, which advantages of Av/Tv you don't know about. :-) For me, these modes are very useful, when I do not have time for full manual setting and I do not want to use full auto mode. Sometimes for example I need the camera not to choose shutter speed less than 1/250 (when I use my telephoto zoom) but I am sure, the camera will choose ...


6

So why are there two different modes or what's the difference between them? Because trying to control aperture by setting the shutter speed and trying to predict what aperture the camera will choose is impractical. When you're taking a portrait, for example, you might want to choose a specific aperture. You can adjust the shutter speed in Tv mode until you ...


6

You are essentially correct in a simple case. It is really simply a convenience thing, though it does make a difference when dealing with more than 2 parameters. Don't think of it in terms of what the computer is doing, but what the person is doing. If I want to have control of the depth of field for creative reasons, I will choose Av. If I happen to ...


6

I think what you're saying is that the camera will pick the same total exposure in either mode. For example: Suppose you're in aperture priority mode with f/8 selected. The camera picks a shutter speed of 1/250 second. If you then switch to shutter priority mode and select a shutter speed of 1/250 second, you find that the camera picks an aperture of f/8. ...


6

You should base your decisions for shutter speed, aperture, and ISO, on your artistic needs, so that you achieve a correct exposure, the amount of bokeh/sharpness you desire, and low noise. See What is the "exposure triangle"? A high shutter speed will help to reduce shake, but it makes no difference after a certain point (typically cited as "1/...


5

According to the Pentax K50 and K10D manuals, in P mode, if I select aperture, then program will choose a corresponding shutter speed, and if I specify shutter speed, then camera will select a corresponding aperture. Not entirely true. After reading the manual, you can't set values other than ISO. Av & Tv lets you set the aperture & shutter speed (...


5

It's a common mistake to use shutter priority because you want a slower shutter speed: you're thinking mainly about exposure time so having full control over the shutter speed seems the right way to go. Unfortunately, the problem is that cameras have a vast range of shutter speeds (mine goes from 30 seconds to 1/8000th of a second) but a comparatively tiny ...


5

Additionally, if you're in Tv mode, when you half-press the button, if you see the Aperture number blinking, it means you are underexposing your picture. You can force the camera to take the picture, but the blinking was there to warn you. In Manual mode, as was said by @tenmiles, the Exposure Meter will tell you whether you are properly exposed. ...


5

The whole point of Tv mode is that you don't adjust the aperture; the camera meters the scene and calculates the aperture based on the selected shutter speed and ISO setting. If you want to adjust the aperture, use Av or M mode. You might also need a tripod if your shutter speed is consequently too slow to hand-hold. As to the "milky water", I think what ...


4

Short: In most cases "BULB" is a speed setting accessible only in MANUAL mode so you will have full control of aperture and ISO settings. Longer: "Bulb" mode is the ultimate manual mode. Bulb is accessible in Manual mode and MAY be accessible in Shutter-speed priority mode. It COULD have a setting of its own but is usually at the low end of the shutter ...


4

Most of the cameras that I know have separate Bulb mode and shutter priority, the Bulb can be in the manual mode and you can get it by increasing the shutter speed till you get bulb (Like in some Canon models). But it's not reasonable to make it attached with the shutter priority mode because the camera wouldn't know in advance how long you are going to open ...


4

The advantage of aperture or shutter priority modes over manual is the same as any automation: when it works right, it takes labor out of our hands and makes life easier, allowing us to concentrate on other things. And on modern cameras, the automatic metering is pretty good — it basically does the right thing most of the time. And, if you get to know your ...


4

You are getting pure white images because there is too much light coming into the camera. For smooth water you need a shutter speed of at least half a second. To reduce the amount of light coming into the camera in this time, you can do one or more of the following: Reduce the ISO to the smallest value (e.g. ISO 100) Make the aperture physically smaller ...


4

Well I was trying to shoot outside on a bright sunny day. I was totally relying on the meter The meter is for manual mode. Ignore it if you're in shutter or aperture priority. It may blink Lo at you if it thinks it's too dark, or pop up the flash, but just give it a try and see what you get. You were probably fine to shoot Sunny 16 Rule says on a ...


4

In my experience (with a Canon, not Pentax, but it's probably similar), P mode is part-way between Auto and Av/Tv modes. The difference between P and full auto is that you are given the option of making creative adjustments, if you want. The camera will use its auto algorithm (or something like it) to choose an aperture and shutter speed, and you can then (...


4

In general, the answer is "no" for the reasons explained in detail in the other answers given. In the typical situation the main focus should be on aperture as Rafael explains. But there are situations where the shutter speed should have priority. If you take pictures of fast moving objects like birds in flight, or you are moving fast yourself, e.g. you want ...


3

Your exposure gets basically determined by three things: Aperture ISO Shutter-speed These three properties together determine the amount of stops. There are tables as a general guideline for how many stops you need under certain circumstances. One example is given here.. According to this table, the most common bright daylight setting equals the number ...


3

TV stands for Time Value. This is basically to indicate that you can set the Shutter Speed manually and the aperture will set automatically depending on the other parameters you've set like the exposure and the ISO. This mode is very handy in case of bird photography, sports photography or anything where shutter speed needs to be constant.


3

Whilst Itai's answer is very good - I would also be sure to check that you have not got flash power compensation turned up, and also that you have not got exposure compensation turned up by mistake.


3

Is it a good practice if I always use the highest shutter speed for regular shooting? It is not a good practice always doing the same thing. It is not a recipe. In my humble opinion I rarely think of the shutter speed first. I think first about the aperture, because, in most cases, the DOF has more weight on a composition than the speed. In second place ...


3

Since we all desire that our image is a winner, we want high acuity. This is an aperture that is (as a rule of thumb) 2 f/stops down from max. Thus the best ISO and shutter speed setting for general usage, causes this to happen. Also, a rule of thumb that is useful -- the minimum shutter speed to use is 1 over ISO. Thus is your setting is 100 ISO then 1/100 ...


2

You should use the Aperture priority mode, and keep the aperture the same for all shots, otherwise you could get some odd focus differences between shots. The only downside is if you have to go low on your shutter speed and pick up motion blur. The easiest thing to do is use the camera settings that do multiple shots (usually -2,0, +2) in rapid succession, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible