Incense

by Bart Arondson

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28

A great resource for looking at camera bodies and shutter life is the Camera Shutter Life Expectancy Database. For those that have DSLR's, spread the word and submit your #'s! Different camera bodies have different MTBF ratings. Some more important factors are how the person cared for their camera and the typical environment. Regular dust cleaning, for ...


21

I wouldn't worry about it. Shutters can (and do) eventually fail, but the good news is that repair is relatively affordable. I know a few folks who have had shutters replaced, the cost has generally been between $200-300. Take a look at another question which discussions how many actuations are "too many" and talks about the likelihood of failure. Enjoy ...


15

No, it doesn't mean that people have to buy new cameras every few years (at least for the reason of failing camera shutters! ;-) ) Keep in mind that shutters can be completely replaced/refurbished for significantly less than the cost of an entirely new camera. As is mentioned elsewhere, it's important also to remember that these numbers are simply ...


15

No, for a CMOS based dSLR, the shutter remains open during the video recording, so the shutter in use is actually electronic. B&H photo, by the way, have a pretty good article on some of the concepts. It's in reference to video recorders, but much, not all, of it applies to dSLRs as well. Anyways, you do have an actuation for the act of flipping the ...


14

A Word About Shutter Ratings Shutter actuation counts are computed in a similar way to hard drive "mean time before failure" ratings. It is impossible, practically speaking, to physically test a hard drive under normal usage until it physically dies enough times to actually get statistically useful results. If a company tried to, they would spend some 11 ...


14

They don't test every unit. It isn't necessary. They test some units. Having a shutter count of zero is perfectly normal and not a concern. I have read anecdotal evidence that people who have owned dozens of DSLR cameras have always received cameras that have a shutter count of zero. I believe it to be few and far between that people receive units that have ...


13

Different camera shutters are rated for different numbers of actuations as you state so that should influence how many is too many. Also actuations will roughly correlate with how well used the camera is, so that might indicate wear or the mount / body / battery. Battery wear is probably most significant. Having owned SLRs that have had shutters fail from ...


12

ac·tu·ate [ak-choo-eyt] –verb (used with object), -at·ed, -at·ing. 1. to incite or move to action; impel; motivate: actuated by selfish motives. 2. to put into action; start a process; turn on: to actuate a machine. You pretty much have it. A shutter "actuation" is the opening and closing of the shutter when a picture is taken. It should ...


12

I have no proof, but I wouldn't worry about this unless you shoot many many long exposure shots, or in very hot conditions. Sensors are basically just converting light to electrons. In today's digital cameras we are using CMOS sensors, which use very little power, so I would assume that equates to less damage over time as compared to a CCD. I wouldn't be ...


11

I'm going to go with the premise that they do not wear out. I've long downloaded and stitched together videos of solar activity captured by SOHO, or the Solar Heliospheric Observatory satellite. That satellite was launched in 1995, went operational in 1996, and is still sending back images. Its CCDs get POUNDED by solar particles, high energy protons and ...


11

The Canon 600D uses a mechanical shutter, and it does indeed go up to 1/4000th rate. There is no "electronic" shutter in Canon DSLR's that I know of. You pretty much nailed it on the head with your 'ps'...the two shutter curtains race over the sensor with a tiny slit (see 'Focal plane shutter, high speed' figure), with the second curtain a minuscule fraction ...


10

A few points on this one: Most P&S cameras don't have a mechanical shutter or iris so there are no moving parts and hence the number of images they can capture is practically unlimited (think how many "images" a digital video camera shoots in it's lifetime!) Every Canon I've ever used has it's own very distinctive shutter noise, so it may be that the ...


10

Using the filename to get shutter count might be inaccurate because of previously stored photos. You can try using utilities like http://www.mydigitallife.info/2010/10/20/download-eosinfo-to-check-shutter-count-for-canon-dslr/ to get the real shutter count


9

This article claims to provide a method for getting the shutter count for the 7D. In short, you install gPhoto2 and run the command: photo2 --get-config /main/status/shuttercounter Version 2.4.11 (released on Apr 17th, 2011) has been tested and works with 500D. A little warning: under Ubuntu Linux, my first attempts failed because of the following error: ...


9

Video uses an electronic shutter, rather than the physical shutter used for photo taking, so each individual frame doesn't contribute to the actuation count in a DSLR. However, the mirror and shutter must open at the beginning of live view mode, and close at the end, so technically there is one actuation per time you enter live view.


8

In my experience the shutter tends to fail gradually, i.e. it becomes unreliable shooting at high speeds, the first and second curtains can get out of sync, giving you inaccurate shutter speeds. It can fail completely in one go, but you usually get some warning. The shutter is very light and delicate so it's unlikely to do any damage when it goes! And yes ...


8

In the 550D you can use Magic Lantern. Just install it, press MENU and then DISP. The shutter count will appear in the bottom of the screen. Updating my answer, the current build (as of today 11/17), shows you how many shutter actuations the camera have, and also tells you the number of pictures taken and LV switches + quick focus attempts


7

I am not aware of any available software that would give you the shutter count for Canon 350D. I have used before EOSInfo Utility but I am afraid it only supports 40D, 50D, 450D, 500D, 1000D and 5DmkII. I tested it on 40D and 450D and it worked fine. Based on the notes on the EOSInfo website it seems that this information is not available for other models ...


6

That site suffers from self-selection bias. It is therefore statistically meaningless. Fun, but meaningless. For another example of this problem, take a look at The Linux Counter. This site has been going for 18 years in various forms, it has gotten national magazine press several times, and unlike this shutter activation site, its users are almost ...


6

You already state the Nikon reference, and as far as I know the very same applies to Canon. This is based on the rumors I've found on forums and other sites while searching the very same topic. I found nothing from Canon themselves. What I gathered is that the number is stored on the camera in a memory, this memory can be reset by replacing that memory for ...


5

The wording that Nikon use, 'tested for 300,000 cycles' is vague, misleading and contains too little information to make an informed judgement. It is typical marketing speak. In reliability testing we use more clearly defined terms like 'mean', 'median' or 'expected lifetime'. Presumably they intend this to mean the expected lifetime, or mean lifetime. If ...


5

The damage they suffer in day to day use is probably fairly minor. The same sensor in your camera is the technical basis as the one they use in the Hubble Space Telescope, just beefed up for coping with really, really harsh conditions. If your sensor fails first I think even the manufacturer would be shocked.


5

While I have heard of a few D5000 users encountering Error. Press shutter release button again., indicating a shutter failure, this is rare. Considering your usage, the shutter should last at least two to three years. If and when the shutter fails, it would probably cost about $200 to $300 to replace, but that's a large part of the value of the camera body ...


5

No, neither do I have this information because it is not consistently provided by manufacturers. What I know is that the vast majority of digital cameras have a mechanical shutter, except for the Nikon 1 J1 and a handful of others. You should also note that most cameras do not use their mechanical shutter all the time. Every time you see extremely high ...


5

Shutter life is a statistically distributed value with one model of camera giving widely varying results, as the graphs and tables on the site that you referred to show. Here "shutter" is liable to include anything that moves mechanically when the shutter is operated that would fatally stop camera operation if it 'failed'. Failed could include dead or ...


4

In this page of this review you can find a sound recording of the shutter of a 300D to compare with.


4

Part of the reason the number of cycles is relatively low is that the shutter is a very high performance precision mechanism. The shutter on the D3X is one of the fastest around. It has to be able to complete it's operation of moving across the frame in a three hundredth of a second and be able to synchronise the movement of the first and second curtains to ...


4

My guess for the shutter speed in the comment was based on the approximate width of the bright strip relative to the image width, multiplied by the sync-speed. I assumed a 1/250sec sync speed. Just a speculation: it looks like the shutter blades get stuck for an brief instance around the middle of the frame. It is possible that you have a piece of dirt ...



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