Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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71

I once made a picture which I believe displays rain quite well. I think the main reason why it works is the backlight coming from the car lights. There are two parts of the image where the rain is very visible. One of them is the area directly in front of the car, where the backlight makes the rain shine and the background is almost black. Another area is ...


51

One of my professors years ago came from a photojournalism background and really drilled the 'both eyes open' ethos into our heads... and when I say drilled, I mean he would have us doing literal drills in order to get our minds around the idea and eliminate the 'bad habit' of closing one eye as soon as we put the viewfinder to our eye. What he had us do ...


41

Here's the list of things that influence depth of field the most (in this particular order): Subject distance, the closer the subject is, the shallower the DOF (think of macro) Focal length, the more millimeters, the shallower the DOF Aperture, the smaller the f-number, the shallower the DOF


40

Photographing rain is very hard because: Rain is fast Rain is small So usually you can do several things: Use flash to "freeze" the rain (or use very high shutter speed if light is permitting) Narrow your angle (zoom) Some examples: http://digital-photography-school.com/forum/how-i-took/107734-rain-flash.html and ...


36

Increase your ISO as far as you can go without losing too much quality (to get a shutter speed as close as possible to the 1/focal length rule). Practice and use a stable shooting position like one of these to help steady the camera: http://blog.muddyboots.org/2009/04/avoiding-blur-due-to-camera-shake.html Slowly and smoothly press the shutter button, don't ...


32

Use a wide angle lens and position yourself low down, as others have stated: Giant legs on even the shortest subject guaranteed! This was shot with a 10mm, the effect is more subtle at longer focal lengths. Wide angle lenses accentuate perspective, they increase the distance in size between near and far objects. By getting low you are making the ...


32

Lets break this down into sub-questions to make the answer more obvious: It is possible for someone NEVER to use the flash? Yes. Buy a DSLR without a built-in one and do not pay for an add-on flash, and voila! Can you make great photos without EVER using a flash? Yes. Just look at photos taken without a flash. My entire gallery has been taken without a ...


30

There's been alot of talk of ETTR which is the opposite of what you're talking, but not much about underexposing. Basically, no, you shouldn't. On most sensors the dark parts are by far the noisest parts of the image, and pushing that in post is just going to make it noisier. You can't recover from pure black either. The reality is you should expose ...


26

This is my low-light hand-held shooting technique: Assume a stable posture, usually not leaning in any direction. Support the camera's weight with the left hand. Grip firmly with the right but let the index-finder loose. Press the shutter-release halfway and wait for a focus-lock (When using AF) Breath in Exhale Gently press the shutter-release fully. Wait ...


25

"Expose to the right" means record the brightest image you can and then reduce the brightness in post to achieve the desired level. The word "right" comes from the histogram, where conventionally brightness increases left to right, thus increasing brightness shifts the whole histogram to the right. ETTR helps reduce noise simply by capturing more light, ...


24

Yes it's perfectly possible to be a photographer, professional or otherwise, without ever using flash, just like you could be a professional photographer without ever using f/2.8. I would however consider someone a more well rounded photographer if they knew how to use flash, even more so if they also knew when to use flash! There are right an wrong ...


22

To understand how to prevent red-eye you need to understand what causes it. Red eye is caused by light from a flash that is close to the lens entering the subjects pupils and bouncing off the rear of the eye back into the lens. (The main cause for the red colour is the blood in the back of the retina). Wikipedia has more info. To prevent red-eye you need ...


22

With underexposure, a third of a stop won't hurt you much. Two-thirds is not great, but not that bad. A whole stop means you're doubling your noise. Two stops and you're quadrupling it. So underexposure is by no means "free", but there are grades of it. With overexposure, any amount will start to clip. Whether that is very detrimental will depend on ...


19

Don't forget to exhale just before triggering the shutter. It works for snipers!


19

Technique is typically at fault with "fuzzy" images 99% of the time with someone new to dSLRs with only an 18-55 kit lens. The lens is not the problem. 18-55s are limited, and they are cheap, and there are much nicer lenses around, but how you use one is more likely to be the fault than what glass is in the lens. People will often blame the lens because ...


18

Ultimately, you want a shallow depth of field, which means a low fstop number (f/2.8 for example). The lower the fstop number, the more light that gets in, so in order to expose correctly, you need to increase your shutter speed (1/1000 is better than 1/25), lower your iso (100 is better than 400), and if all this is not enough, add a neutral density filter ...


18

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


17

While using shallow depth of field is the most common technique to get blurred background, there are some other ways: using plain background so it would not need any blurring set up your own background - you'll have full control over color and pattern shoot against sky or some other plain surface (longer lens will help you by having smaller segment of ...


17

Here are my tips: try to choose the angle so that the raindrops reflect as much light as possible try to frame so that the lighter drops are separated from darker background try to get perspective into the picture (so that there are objects at different distances which will render the lighter the longer the distance to the object) try different (fairly ...


17

This is an idea borrowed from the world of target shooting where precision and observation are of paramount importance. The same concerns are far less important in photography and it is probably more important to do what you find natural and comfortable. Some of the reasons given for two eyed shooting are - facial muscles are more relaxed which ...


17

I could turn that same logic on it's head as such: "The reasoning being that you can always decrease the exposure in postproduction, but you can never get the details back from underexposed parts of the photo." The parts that are pure black are just as hard to get detail out of as the parts that are pure white. And in reality, with digital, since sensor ...


16

I think the only cure is practice, practice, practice. I used to find many of my photos had wonky horizons, but as soon as I recognised it as a problem I made a point of thinking about it with every shot, and it pretty much went away. If you want a visual aid, you may be able to buy a replacement viewfinder grille for your camera with gridlines that will ...


15

If you have a Pentax K-7 or K-5, you can turn on the auto-leveling feature, which will rotate the sensor up to 1° (or 2° with shake reduction off). This seems like kind of a silly feature, but that last percent is actually pretty hard to nail visually, especially if you're focusing on other things. Even if you don't have it auto-correct, you can have a gauge ...


15

Yes, all those flashes are from people who don't know any better, usually using point and shoots or full auto mode. Those flashes do not help the resulting image in any way, but today's cameras (thankfully?) manage to get an acceptable image anyway (probably with the same settings it would have used for no flash auto mode), a few years ago each of those ...


14

In addition to the tripod I use a remote to trigger exposures around 8 second. Or you could set it to 'bulb' (or the equivalent on your camera) and click to open and close the shutter manually with the remote, so you can capture the action you desire. I've shot fireworks at 200 ISO, no need to go higher, in my experience. In fact I stop down the aperture to ...


14

Take a tripod and experiment! Different displays will suit different settings. Is it going to be mainly rockets, or will there be roman candles? Is the scenery worth capturing? And etc. From experience you're going to want a tripod as your exposures won't be in the handheld range. I would also err toward very long exposures and shoot often — you're more ...



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