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by garik

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33

Tv stands for "Time value". Similarly Av stands for "Aperture value". Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shutter_priority


16

I do my bulk of shooting in the aperture priority mode, since I like to have control over the depth of field. Second most common mode is manual for full control, and after that shutter priority mode for the few cases when I want a particular effect based on shutter speed (typically some panning shot with motion blur). Not seldom I actually stick to aperture ...


15

Yes, all those flashes are from people who don't know any better, usually using point and shoots or full auto mode. Those flashes do not help the resulting image in any way, but today's cameras (thankfully?) manage to get an acceptable image anyway (probably with the same settings it would have used for no flash auto mode), a few years ago each of those ...


13

Your strategy with aperture priority mode is a good way to go. If the light in the room is quite even and doesn't change, manual mode will give you more consistent results once you have found your settings. Choosing the right settings for the exposure triangle (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) is always a trade-off in low-light situations. Keep in mind that ...


12

Depends on the camera, but most DSLRs that I've used indicate the metering information (shutter speed, aperture, and ISO) using visible numbers that appear inside the viewfinder. When you half-press the shutter, the camera meters the scene and indicates the settings it will use.


12

I use a program mode the majority of the time that I am not in a studio. An example of that would be aperture priority mode - where I get to set the aperture and ISO that stays consistent, and my camera is allowed to determine the shutter speed to keep the exposure proper. Full Auto mode, which many entry level DSLR cameras have, is great if you hand your ...


9

99% amateurs don't know or want to change the auto settings.


8

I can't find anything, but I remember reading that when the Olympics were at Salt Lake City, during the opening ceremonies disposable film point-n-shoots were given to every single spectator, and they were asked to take photos throughout the event. The goal was not to get people to take photos, but to get the flashes to go off, which looked pretty ...


7

Which of the statements is generally more correct? I believe the first one is correct which is Use all available modes the camera has to offer as I learn more about photography. I'll explain how: Most entry DSLR cameras have the following modes: Full Auto Mode: use this mode if you just want to get the shot, perhaps you saw something that will ...


7

I'd suggest avoiding a full-auto most of the time, and instead, choose a mode based on what you're shooting -- for creative shooting, aperture priority modes (labelled as Av on some cameras) is great at controlling the depth of field without worrying about exposure too much. For sport, and other fast action, jump to shutter priority ( labelled as Tv on some ...


6

Another alternative is to set it up yourself. Put the camera in manual mode Select your widest aperture Select the longest shutter speed you feel comfortable using (~1/focal length without stabilization is a good start) Dial up the ISO until your camera is metering about right (do not underexpose, a properly exposed shot with a higher ISO, is much better ...


4

Shouldn't the camera be able to tell the fastest speed to get a good exposure knowing the aperture and ISO I already set up, shouldn't it? That is precisely the point of Aperture Priority. You set the Aperture (and ISO) and the camera determines the correct Shutter Speed. Vice-versa for Shutter Priority. As ahockley says, most DSLRs will display the ...


4

Be sure you are selecting the Single shooting option in the Drive mode setting rather than the One-Shot AF option in the AF mode setting. When the AF mode is set to One Shot, the camera can still fire continuously. With One Shot AF once focus is achieved the focus will lock until the shutter is released or the half-press is released.


4

You can use an exif reader (like exiftool) to find out this information. For instance, I am checking a picture of mine and I can see Exposure Time: 1/250 F Number: 8.0 Exposure Program: Program AE ISO: 200 Program AE is Aperture priority. A quick google search (for "exposure program exif") offers the following values (taken from this link): 0 = ...


4

To see the shutter speed in Av mode, compose the shot and press the shutter button halfway. The shutter speed will show up in the viewfinder alongside the aperture you have set, in the same spot both numbers always display. Because you've pressed the shutter only halfway, the camera will not take the picture. Keep in mind the camera is determining the ...


4

It sounds like your camera needs to be examined by a Nikon Service Center. Here is a link to a list of locations in India. It might be worth a try to check and see if there is a more current firmware version than the one running on your D5200. If so, try updating the firmware and see if that helps the problem. If you are running the current version of the ...


3

This is normal, Av or 'aperture priority' mode is a semi automatic mode allowing selection of aperture value with shutter speed being calculated by the camera, Similarly Tv or 'shutter priority' mode allows shutter speed to be selected while automatically calculating aperture value. To enable both of these setting to be user selectable at the same time you ...


3

TV stands for Time Value. This is basically to indicate that you can set the Shutter Speed manually and the aperture will set automatically depending on the other parameters you've set like the exposure and the ISO. This mode is very handy in case of bird photography, sports photography or anything where shutter speed needs to be constant.


3

My important pictures are all shot in (M) manual mode, because I either shoot in very difficult lighting conditions, where the cam can't read my mind which part of the image I want properly exposed (think person in spot on dark stage) or I use remote flash, where auto modes don't work since my flash remotes don't do TTL. If I make a simple fast picture of ...


3

Manual mode is especially good in low-light situations where the background is constantly changing brightness. The camera's light meter is measuring reflected light, while what's important is the amount of light shining on the subject. Many times, especially in low-light situations, the amount of light shining on the subject--also known as incident ...


2

It depends on how much time you have to set up the shot. I would leave the camera in Program mode by default to catch shots where I don't have time to modify any settings. If I have a little more time I would go for one of the scene modes as most cameras will do a pretty good job, e.g. landscape mode should give teh AF system a head start to focus in the ...


2

My default is Program (P), for several reasons: I want to shoot RAW (Not possible in automatic/preset modes on my Canon) I want to decide when to use my flash (also not easily configurable in auto/preset) I typically want to use mostly automatic settings. I often switch to Shutter-Priority when using a telephoto or shooting action, or Aperture-Priority ...


2

If a camera has a good auto-iso mode (which most don't, they limit the max ISO in certain modes like manual to as little as ISO 400) then I prefer to shoot in manual so that I can control my depth of field (via aperture) with and shutter speed (to eliminate or insure motion blur - depending on the scenario). However, for most cameras your best bet will be to ...


2

What you are trying to do is enforce a certain aperture and shutter speed while setting ISO to match them. Instead of doing it the last bit by hand, I'd suggest to use manual mode with Auto ISO, or TAv mode, if your camera has it.


2

The modes progressively give more control to the photographer and less to the camera in roughly this order: Full Auto Creative Modes(Night, Landscape, Portrait) Program Mode Aperture, Shutter, or ISO priority Manual Mode They are all available for different situations, skill levels, and ease of use. If you have requirements such as shooting in RAW, you ...


2

I would suggest not using any setting other than Tv, Av, and M. You want to control something, be it the shutter speed (Tv), aperture (Av) or everything (M). I have yet to see a case where the camera is smart enough on P or Auto to pick better than I would. In particular, I know whether I'll be able to hand hold with a given lens at a specific shutter ...


2

In any landscape mode, ideally you want small aperture for depth of field, low ISO and you assume a static scene so shutter speed isn't important, and in fact a tripod may be assumed. Daytime Landscape should give preference to smaller apertures for greater depth of field, e.g. f/8 or f/11. ISO and shutter speed would be managed to get the lowest ISO ...


2

If you are holding it half way, it is a pretty soft press between a half way press and a full press. Personally, I always use mine in one of the continuous drive modes, but I've had times when I've had it go off prematurely while I was adjusting focus or metering as a result of how light the second stage trigger is. If you have a light touch, I'd hazard ...


2

Personally, I'd go with Tv (shutter priority) mode in this kind of situation. That way, you can set the minimum acceptable shutter speed and let the camera take care of the aperture. As for ISO, go as high as you have to without straying into the expanded modes. I don't have a lot of experience with modern auto-ISO systems, so I can't help you there.


2

In low light situations like this, you'll need to make trade offs between shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. Choosing between aperture priority and shutter priority will depend on whether you need to prioritize control of the depth of field or freezing motion. In the described circumstances, camera motion is likely to be a bigger problem than subject ...



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