Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

by sat

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12

Privacy reasons are certainly the main concern. The second concern is bandwidth. Stripping EXIF information makes images considerably lighter at web-sizes. This makes it a better experience of 99% of viewers who do not care about how the image was made. Lastly, the information may not exist. A lot of images on the web are composites, be it HDR/Exposure ...


10

Picasa Web Albums work best. It meets the following of your requirements: You can catalog a large number of photos (you may need to purchase additional storage from Google based on image resolution, but its relatively cheap) You can tag individuals and add categories. You can customize your privacy settings and sharing options. It's really easy to set-up, ...


9

Flickr allows nudes as long as you change the image's "safety level" so kiddos and people at work don't get them popping up on a search; you're perfectly within the ToS. You can also make groups and galleries private if you'd rather limit who can see the photos and/or comment on them...


8

Privacy and default export settings (like Itai said) do play an important role but there's another factor A photographer may research a location, travel there in the right time of year, wake up at unreasonable hours to get there on time for sunrise - again and again and again waiting for the perfect weather, obsess about the exact camera location and take ...


7

By definition, the reason photo sharing sites exist in the first place is to bring photos and viewers together in the same place. If that site is a commercial site, then more photos and more viewers tends to yield more of whatever it is that site is monetizing (ads, memberships, etc.). So if it's a commercial site, and your photos are attracting any views ...


6

You can use a single account and share the single login with your family. That's the only solution I can think of that will let you edit each other's albums. Generally different users are not allowed to edit another user's albums, at least on all the services I can think of. You might also try Google plus, you can make a circle for your family and share ...


5

I haven't used it before, but I have heard good things about pixelpost: http://www.pixelpost.org/ Pixelpost is an open-source, standards-compliant, multi-lingual, fully extensible photoblog application for the web. Anyone who has web-space that meets the requirements can download and use Pixelpost for free!


5

At least according to Wikipedia, these types of sites can be referred to as geolocation-oriented photo sharing sites. Here is the list of what I use: Flickr Map Google Maps(Click on "Photos" feature) Photosynth on Bing Maps(I click into it from the PS site) Google Earth Panoramio(The same as the two above) - More info at StackOverFlow Stuck On ...


5

If you're going to 'show them to the world' - you need to ask. That's common courtesy and, more importantly, you may not be ingrained in their lives enough to know if there's a serious reason to not want them up and public. (For example, I have a friend who went through a messy adoption and posting pictures of his kids on Facebook could complicate his ...


4

I believe you could use flickr for that. You can set a group there, post those photos in this group - this means they are all reachable from a single place. Although Flickr doesn't support voting on photos directly, in stackexchange style - "upvote"/"downvote" you can post the votes in the comments. Just my $0.02 Edit: I believe it also wouldn't be ...


4

FOTKI allow email upload, which meets your requirement. An album is assigmed an email_code and emails can thene be sent by anyone to user_name+emai_code@fotki.com and will end up in the correct album. Photos are usually available in under a minute. You obviously want to be careful who knows a given user_name, email_code combination as it can be badly ...


4

IMHO: If you value sharing over everything: Flickr If you value photography-centric community: 500px If you value simplicity and ease of use in your online portfolio: Zenfolio If you would like a bit of all the above, but with flexibility to custom code your own online portfolio: Smugmug Smugmug isn't quite the sharing site that Flickr is, and isn't ...


4

One of the simplest solutions would be to install the Gallery on the Synology server. It is a web based gallery software. It is listed on Synology list of Gallery software and it a rather proven solution. Since it is listed on the Synology list, it is actually tested by the Synology team. There are more Gallery software listed there, but I have no personal ...


4

Bandwidth is not a concern. It's restricted to 64kb, which is nothing. But as mentioned, programs can strip the data. If you photoshop a picture that information can appear in the EXIF data. Maybe they don't want you to know they photoshopped. :P


4

The "Olympic Journey" exhibition at the Royal Opera House this summer had much the same problem, only with the Olympic torch rather than the FA Cup. As far as I can tell they went for your bespoke solution: a simple PHP website where you could enter your unique code and retrieve your photo. The site is still up, at http://theolympicjourneytorchphoto.com. As ...


3

Take a look at the Open Photo Project - It is an open source photo sharing project, where the user retains control over his or her pictures. You choose where you put your pictures and then use their frontend to scour your photos. The inception of OpenPhoto was a desire to liberate our photos and take back control. And as it is open source, you or ...


3

Definitely have a look at The OpenPhoto Project. You can think of it as a modern version of Gallery. A sample site is at http://current.openphoto.me and you can find more information at http://theopenphotoproject.org. I'm the lead developer so you can ping me any questions at jaisen@openphoto.me. I'm positive that it'll meet the requirements you're looking ...


3

If you have the ability to run a webserver with php on Linux, then Gallery is one of the best options for web gallery. You can also use Lightroom to build HTML galleries. For both images and video, using a DLNA server is a great option, as you can then use PS3, BluRay, Boxee or other similar viewer to see images and movies. I have a WD Live drive that has ...


3

I've been using Photoshelter for the last few years, it isn't the cheapest solution out there, but I believe it is the best. The customer service is great and it makes it easy to sell your images as both prints and electronic files.


3

I used to have my own CMS, which I wrote specific to my purposes, but ultimately decided to go with Wordpress in combination with the NexGen gallery plugin. I've been happy with it and, if you don't have the hardware to host your own, Wordpress offers hosting. I'm running directly myself, easy as pie to maintain.


3

500px I've been on 500px for a few weeks now; it does, indeed, seem to be the new hotness in terms of photo-sharing sites, but it's probably too early to judge its long-term staying power. At this point, the site is positioned as high-end content (think 1X), but with the openness of Flickr and some nice social networking features. One of the big open ...


3

There isn't a right or wrong answer here unless your local jurisdiction has laws about it. As long as you are reasonable about what you put online, I don't expect there to be any problems as long as the parents aren't complaining about it. Use your judgement and share the photos you spend time and effort to produce. That said, if they were friend's kids ...


3

What I do on Flickr, which I think works reasonably well: All photos featuring a child are "friends and family" (my children), "family only" (other children in my extended family) or completely private (other people's children). This means that if people do have accounts on Flickr, they get access to the appropriate photos without having to jump through ...


2

I use Piwigo, it's dead easy and has many plugins, themes, and options. It's also free and open-source if that matters to you (if not it certainly won't get in your way). You can use it with your own hosting, or pay Piwigo to host and manage your site. From their website: "Piwigo is a photo gallery software for the web, built by an active ...


2

Gallery, from http://gallery.menalto.com/, makes another good option. The 1.x versions had some scalability problems, and the 2.x series was a bit over-complicated, but the current 3.x version aims to be just right (and looks to do a pretty good job of it). If you want to do more than just display photos, Gallery 3 isn't a great choice — the interface for ...


2

I've heard of, but haven't used, Gallery. It may require more work on your part than some of the solutions you listed, but may also provide some additional flexibility (like the shopping cart (depends on which version you install) and the ability to define your own user lists).


2

another option to look at is the open photo project http://theopenphotoproject.org/ running a private server with it might solve many of your needs. The hosted version at http://openphoto.me/, but if you want to run your own server, the code is there for you.


2

I really like the Microsoft Skydrive photo gallery. Just upload pictures to your skydrive, and send people a private link to access the automatically generated gallery. I believe Dropbox has a similar feature too.


2

Since you want to share pictures privately, only to your friends and family, flickr is actually one possible solution. The right to use for site promotion only applies to content uploaded in publicly visible areas. This means that if you upload a picture and set its visibility to "public", it can be used. So if you always upload them as private, put them ...



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