Moonlight

by Jakub

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1

I believe the problem you're asking about is green non-uniformity (GNU) It is typically caused by differences cross talk from adjacent pixels in column direction. The difference in sensitive of the adjacent blue or red pixel will cause differences in the exposure of green pixel in question. This is typically counter acted by maintaining two green gain ...


1

More generally, what is the nature of the gamut? Primaries as peak sensitivity don't behave the same as primaries for mixing output. I suppose this is necessary to know for RAW importing and would be explicitly stated in a DNG file. Do they vary greatly between cameras? The output from the sensor is RGB based, so if interpreted simply as three ...


-2

I've had mine 5 months now and there is a horrible issue with dust on the sensor. It costs around $100 to get it cleaned up here...


3

On the screen at the back of the camera, a preview is constantly shown. I assume this preview is made by light hitting the sensor constantly. So this must require the shutter/aperture to be permanently open. Correct. This puts the sensor into what's called "Live view" mode which is effectively the mode it takes video in. Data is constantly being read ...


3

Digital cameras and films to do not have "primaries". The spectral sensitives of digital cameras and films dictate their response to various wavelengths of light. These native responses are sometimes encoded relative to a set of encoding primaries such as rec709, adobeRGB, Kodak ProPhoto (aka RIMM/ROMM), or ACES but these encoding primaries have nothing to ...


1

I found this page which includes the illustration: It reminds me of how the human eye works, which I'm sure is not a coincidence. The similarity is that the difference in red and green spans most of it, with blue breaking the tie by picking out the left side. The green right slope comes down around 630 and blue picks out the half left of the green ...


3

The full frame camera will generally give more distortion than a crop body camera with the same wide angle lens because the wider angle of view obtained with a FF camera includes the edges that are cropped when using the same lens with an APS-C camera. Cropping the FF camera's image to get the same Field of View (FoV) as the APS-C camera will yield the same ...


5

I think this is an "apples and oranges" comparison - of you use the same lens on a full frame and a crop camera, you get different fields of view, so it's not really meaningful to compare which has more distortion. That said, the literal answer to your question is using the lens on a full frame camera, as you're then using the full extent of the lens's ...


1

An extension tube won't work because the amount of extension needed would limit you to only Macro photos. You would only be able to focus a few inches in front of the lens. A 1.4x or 1.5x teleconverter will work. Depending on the lens, you may need a 2x teleconverter to completely eliminate the vignetting at all focal lengths.


2

To increase the 28.8mm image circle cast by the APS-C lens to the 43.2mm image circle needed by the FF sensor, you would need to increase the focal length by a factor of 0.5, or one-half again. A 24mm lens would require a 12mm extension tube. A 50mm lens would require a 25mm extension tube. A 100mm lens would require a 50mm extension tube, and so on. That is ...


4

Yes... kind of. You'll be projecting the image to a larger size. If you move the lens out by a 1/3 of focus distance using extensions, shouldn't you gain the full frame image? With possible loss of infinity focus? Putting 35mm of extension on a 100mm lens or 10mm of extension on a 30mm lens isn't just a "you can't focus at infinity" but takes you well ...


2

The electronic shutter speed is limited by the rate at which the camera reads the image data from the sensor. For most CMOS sensors, and therefore most regular DSLRs, the camera reads image data from it progressively, rather than reading all the image data instantaneously. As it reads, it resets the data held by those pixels. If this process takes, for ...


1

I don't really know what you're asking about. If you want to capture sharp and clear images of moving paper, its speed isn't really relevant. What's important is rather the angular velocity of the details you want to capture. If the paper is far away it would be no problem to take a picture. A more detailed shot of the paper could end up blurry (the angular ...


-1

Yess Sensor type affects image quality actually CCD sensors are expensive. it's more sensitive to light and delivers better ISO performance. where CMOS production process is more automated and its relatively cheaper so its used in more quantity. google the CMOS\CCD Image sensor layout


2

Here are some of the ways: http://www.image-engineering.de/iq-products/iq-tools/measurement-devices/camspec http://www.image-engineering.de/iq-products/iq-tools/measurement-devices/camspecs-express I use a monochromator, light sphere, and a photodiode. You can find most of those supplies at Edmund Optics http://www.edmundoptics.com/ and similar shops. You ...


1

Yes, color sensitivity is often measured and specified in bits. DxOMark provides one example and incorporates this into their camera ratings. From the description of their "Color Depth" test: Color sensitivity indicates to what degree of subtlety color nuances can be distinguished from one another, often meaning a hit or a miss on a Pantone ...



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