India Point Park

India Point Park
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0

What is an IR-sensor of the shutter? For shutter release? It sounds like you're talking about an infra-red receiver that allows a wireless remote control to trip the shutter, like this: Can I disable it (software-wise or hardware-wise) or remove it to prevent leakage of IR into CMOS when IR-filter is removed? If you really are talking about the ...


1

One thing to consider is that the size of the image that the lens projects is completely independent of its f-number and focal length, but a factor of the lens design. F-number is a product of the width of the aperture, and the focal length. The focal length is the distance between the point of convergence, and the sensor, completely ignoring factors beyond ...


2

Let us pretend that sensors are ideal photon detectors with infinite dynamic range [...]. Let us also assume that all these sensors have the same number of photosites. The question "Why are larger sensors better at low light?" does not answer my question as all the answers assume constant f-number, which is exactly the proposition I would like to ...


7

Why does it seem like large sensors are necessary for good low-light performance? Because for the same amount of light passing through a lens a larger sensor will collect more of it. Your tire size analogy is seriously flawed. A better analogy would be increasing the diameter of the engine's cylinders. The size of the individual molecules of the ...


0

The light that falls on a unit area is governed by the size of the entrance pupil. A larger sensor requires a longer focal length to achieve the same field of view. That larger sensor requires a larger entrance pupil to maintain a given f-number. The larger pupil gathers more light. You must maintain the f-number as that, together with the shutter speed and ...


3

A larger sensor requires a larger focal length to deliver the same field of view. Given the same entrance pupil size, this increases the f-number, cancelling the effect of capturing more light. This is at least part of your misunderstanding. f-number is not affected by sensor size. Field of view is, of course, because a smaller sensor sees only a part ...


4

The majority of cameras use the JPEG preview (with picture styles applied) embedded in a RAW file as the source data for the histogram and blinkies. In other words, it's just using what's sent to your LCD display for review. This is probably due to limited processor load and data paths, and is a cause for complaint among photographers--that the data they're ...


-1

I have had the Rebel T5 for over a year. I have cleaned it myself and it's a pain I tell you! My first Rebel had a self-cleaning function. This is the only thing I don't like about the T5. Dust gathers up a lot if you are changing lenses frequently.


3

The first generation of EXR sensors were SuperCCD EXR and produced in 1/2.3" and 1/1.6" sizes. When Fuji switched to CMOS, they introduced the EXR CMOS in 2/3" and 1/2.3" sizes. The largest being the 2/3" sensor which is present in the X10. EXR cameras all had EXR initially in their name, so they are easy to identify: F200 EXR S200 EXR F70 EXR F80 EXR ...


8

Looks really bad. Normally, dust gets on top of the stack of optical filter which sits above the sensor. It then shows as small blurry disks which get smaller and darker at narrow apertures because they are close to the sensor but not directly on. From your example, I would guess that you have dust that entered below the filters and is directly on the ...


8

It's highly unlikely that this many pixels on the sensor would become "dead" in quick succession, or in this pattern (groups of pixels, rather than individual pixels). This is clearly dust directly on the sensor. I also see indicators of dust on the inside of the lens (larger, out-of-focus areas that are lighter than their surrounding pixels). For ...


2

Would setting it to 13.1MP allow for a greater Sensor Pixel Area or PPI ... Sensor Pixel Area and Pixels Per Inch are opposites. It's not clear if you meant this as an either/or question but it is. Selecting a lower resolution from the same complete sensor will give you a lower PPI. At the same time it effectively gives you a larger SPA by combining ...


0

FF sensor area (fxA)= 36x24mm= 864mm squared (^2), Any area of a given sensor can be represented by MP's as well as square mm Therefore, APS-C effective area (efA)= 24x16mm= 384mm^2 or possibly XMP (only as an example) FF crop factor for angle of view (cf) of lens is inversely related to the ratio of diagonal lengths of the rectangle made by the sensor ...


4

Greater sensor area in the way you've described it would give you a lower PPI value as it is Pixels Per Inch, of which you are recording fewer in your output file. Theoretically, there will be some super-sampling which will provide more accuracy by averaging groups of pixels which will be treated as one later on. The effects of noise would be reduced at ...


1

Would setting it to 13.1MP allow for a greater ... PPI in my final picture? In terms of PPI, no. In fact, your effective PPI in the final picture is reduced. When you choose smaller image sizes in camera, when the picture is taken, the full sensor is still used. However, when the camera's processor goes to write the image to a JPEG file, the image is ...


1

Michael's answer covers well how the area and dimensions of the two sensor sizes relate, but does not conceptually explain how or why that appears to affects focal length. I'll try to explain that. A lens designed for full frame 35mm (FF35) is designed to project a circular image large enough to cover a 36x24mm sensor / film frame. So what we have to ...


-3

A word or two on crop factor: Over the years the camera has shrunk. As film evolved its resolving power improved and smaller film formats became commonplace. In the early 1900’s a still camera using 35mm motion picture film was introduced. The 35mm film format (image size) measures 24mm height by 36mm length. Millions of 35mm cameras were sold. Because of ...


7

Crop factor is expressed as a ratio of the linear measurements of a sensor compared to a 36x24mm 35mm film frame or a full frame sensor. This is because a sensor exactly half as large as another will also provide exactly half the angle of view as the other with a lens of the same focal length. Or conversely, a sensor half as large requires a lens of half the ...


0

Stars are point sources of light. This makes it especially difficult for a Bayer masked sensor to generate consistent results as the sky moves slightly between each exposure. The raw data obtained on a Bayer masked sensor must be interpolated by comparing and averaging the amount of light striking adjacent pixels as well as nearby pixels sensitive to the ...


1

I noticed the same trouble with sony A77II. Now my camera is at Sony's repair center, so I can't do any test, but I think that the problem could be the e-curtain. Did you try turning it off? I'll try when my camera will be back from the repair center.



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