Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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0

Well, my 7 year old son refused to listen to the advice, but instead changed the setting from 6M quality to 2M quality on my Finepix A610 and it fixed the problem ! If that doesn't work , use 0.3M . Oh, and he says to set the mode to manual, otherwise it will blur. Cool, I'm very happy about that.


2

Measuring QE without a NIST-calibrated standard is nontrivial. It's even harder when you have to deal with the analog gain applied prior to storing the RAW image's A-to-D values. On top of that, the QE is strongly wavelength-dependent, so unless your project is using lasers or other narrowband sources, you are in a deep pile of youknowwhat. If you do have ...


0

The short answers are: If using a FF lens use a FF body. If using a APS-C lens use a APS-C body. If you need to crop the FF image in post to get closer, then use an APS-C otherwise FF may be better after all.


1

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) specifies how photographic films are to be tested to determine their sensitivity to light. The ISO of any film is one of the key elements needed to calculate the camera exposure settings. Technically the ISO value is specific for films however digital photography embraces ISO thus the ISO settings of the ...


9

You're both right and wrong. Yes, technically the "ISO setting" is merely an amplification of sensor data. However the quantization (feeding the analog signal into the analog-digital converter) happens after the amplification. So, from the sensor (as in photosensitive die alone) point of view, the amplification doesn't change the actual light sensitivity. ...


-1

Full frame cameras offer better results in form of sharpness and noise, so you could use a full frame and crop it later in APS-C format.


0

Most answers here compare the use of a crop-sensor camera with the option of cropping in post. This raises the question of comparing either megapixel counts or pixel densities, as discussed in all the answers. However, all these answers fail to address a very essential issue: viewfinder magnification. Crop-sensor cameras almost universally have a larger ...


3

There's no universal answer. Cameras are different, with differing resolutions, pixel pitch, and noise performance. A newer camera can trump a bigger camera. Does the bigger one have bigger pixels, more pixels the same pitch, or something in between, which makes them harder to compare? Also, you might be able to afford a much better lens (or only use the ...


-2

You could use APS-C camera to save some considerable weight, size or money. But if you are looking for the best image quality especially when the light is not plentiful, top of the line FF cameras will give you better chance compared to the same generation APS.


5

There can definitely be some benefit to be gained by using a crop sensor camera when longer focal length is desireable. It is one of the reasons compact "superzoom" cameras can give fields of view equivalent to 1000mm+ focal lengths on a full frame camera with a much smaller lens than would be required to get that same FoV using a full frame sensor camera. ...


3

Because the gain you set affects the image. The higher the gain, the brighter the resulting image from the sensor. While it may not specifically be the sensitivity of the sensor hardware to light that's affected, the sensitivity of the final image data to the light is affected by the iso setting you choose. Whether or not you use a gain setting of iso 100 ...


4

We control the sensitivity of the digital sensor or technically speaking controlling the post-image gain applied to the signal, but for all intents and purposes, we can think of it as sensitivity. It is part of the exposure triangle because when using an automatic or semi-automatic exposure mode the ISO setting influences the selected shutter speed or ...


8

Crop sensors are indeed used for wildlife to get more reach without sacrificing megapixels. And, you can get closer images without spending as much money. Sure, you could crop, but then your printing dimensions will be reduced. For display on the web, at 72dpi or so, it wouldn't matter if you cropped. All that said, remember that to get the same image as a ...


7

Not necessarily. The APS-C sensor merely crops the image that would have been captured on a full frame sensor, so you end up with what you'd get if you used a full frame and cropped in post (see: Does my crop sensor camera actually turn my lenses into a longer focal length? and Is crop-factor a bad thing?) But given a full-frame and a crop sensor of the ...


12

The Bayer filter passbands are designed to be make the sensor have a reasonable match to the human eye, while not costing too much. They're fairly leaky even in the visible part of their stop band, and pretty much uncontrolled in the IR. To increase their blocking in the IR a more expensive recipe in a thicker layer would be needed. The thicker layer isn't ...


1

Living in Florida, which is a semi-tropical area, condensation forming is a major problem. Little somewhat circular darker spots will be seen in RAWs and JPGs. The only solution is to slowly acclimate your camera (even the weatherproof Pentax 645Z) slowly to the change in temperatures when you go from air conditioning to the hot and sometimes muggy elements.


2

Back in the 1980s, Craig Anderton wrote a book called Home Recording for Musicians in which he observed that a recording studio isn't a capturer of reality, it's a processor of reality. You should think of your camera the same way. The light making up an image enters the lens, which changes it, reaches the sensor, which changes it, is passed through ...


1

The answer will vary from lens to lens, and probably on other factors as well, such as whether the image stabilizer is in the center. :-) The biggest problem with Canon's EF-S design has nothing to do with the image circle and everything to do with the short backfocus. Because the back of the lens sticks farther into the camera with EF, moving from a 1.6x ...


4

It varies highly from camera to camera. Some designs do a minimum of processing on the image sensor itself, others do a little more. Those that do more do so mainly in the area of noise reduction either before or after sending the analog data to be converted to digital data. One method is the relative amplification of the signal from pixels masked for red, ...


4

No. It's fine; I can't imagine why there might be a problem. Automatic sensor cleaning generally works by shaking the sensor a small amount at high frequency. This doesn't get anywhere near the lens (at least, not more than the sensor already is). I guess it's mildly possible that some dust might end up transmitted to the rear element of the lens, but that's ...


0

One thing that has impact on these parameters is density of the Bayer filter placed on top of the sensor. If two manufacturers use the same sensor but different density of the Bayer filter, there will be differences in amount of light that passes through and therefore (among else) different noise levels that I believe are essential for the DxO numbers. ...


2

pixel has different meaning in spheres of display technology and sensor technology. pixel of RGB Bayer sensor is represented by only one number (roughly one colour) while pixel of most of RGB graphic displays is represented by three numbers. The number of pixels noted on cameras is not the number of dots divided by four - it is actual number of dots on the ...


3

Basically, a RAW file stores data directly from the sensor of your camera. Most DSLR are using what is called a Bayer filter (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bayer_filter) to retrieve information about color. Usually, for 4 "pixels" (sensitive elements), 2 are used to get information about green, 1 for red and 1 for blue. However, keep in mind that this sensor ...


5

DxO are not specifically inaccurate, but like any lab testing the methodology is important to the interpretation of results. The result as seen in files (used to obtain measurements) is a result of the WHOLE image processing chain, not merely one aspect. Every part of the image pathway is important to contributing to the accuracy of the capture process. ...


-1

The Question is about the sensor not the system. No. I think it depends more on what was done with the data from the sensor than on the sensor itself. The sensor itself has a fixed response under similar circumstances. Disclaimer: We're talking averages/specifications as if one could actually use the same sensor by exchanging it in different bodies. In ...


3

can the same sensor technically produce different results in 2 different bodies? I guess it could produce different results even in the same body, due to different environments. If you take an image in a hot climate, the camera will be a lot hotter, which usually means more noise and possibly a different dynamic range. From that point of view, having the ...



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