Open

by damned truths

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

31

Second curtain sync doesn't do anything more to freeze motion than first curtain. The reason to use second curtain sync is that the ambient light trails you get with a long exposure appear behind the subject (as the sequence is ambient first then flash) instead of in front, which looks a bit weird. In the top image (first curtain sync) the headlight trail ...


17

There are actually three possibilities here: "Regular" flash First-curtain slow-speed sync Second-curtain slow-speed sync The last is also goes by a couple of other names: trailing curtain or rear curtain. Nikon, for example, calls it "rear curtain + slow sync". Normally, the flash is so bright that shutter speed has a negligible effect on the exposure ...


11

The first flash is part of the eTTL system. The camera is using it to establish the exposure. If you switch to manual flash mode it will not happen (but you will have to fix the exposure yourself). This initial flash occurs before the shutter opens and does not affect exposure, but is rather used to measure the light as part of the metering processed. You ...


10

Second curtain sync is a flash-related term. In usual first curtain mode the flash is fired just after shutter opens, while in second curtain case the flash is fired just before shutter closes. This makes a difference with slow shutter speeds making the motion blur appear after moving objects instead of before them. Here's an example of second-curtain sync ...


6

Unfortunately there is no way to get a Canon DSLR to actually send the flash signal when the shutter is about to close! Canon flashes know the shutter speed so they can delay the firing. When using a flash that doesn't talk to the camera you can't get second curtain sync. However, when using a Pocketwizard, you can set the Pocketwizard to add the appropriate ...


6

Let's discuss what each of the terms mentioned in your question means. Fill Flash: When there is enough overall light in the scene to take a picture, but there are shadows that need to be smoothed out, fill flash can be used to lighten the shadows. Even outdoors on a sunny day, if the sun is high overhead or behind your subject you can use fill flash to ...


5

Shooting in a nightclub is one of the situations where I wouldn't bounce. Bouncing works great when you have a nice high white ceiling, white walls and you want a soft flattering light. In a club setting you often have uneven low ceilings with strange colours. Instead I use a direct flash approach, usually with a ringlight adaptor such as the Orbis. This ...


5

This is wrong; you are right. The sensor can't tell which part of the exposure goes "on top" of the other. You don't have to take my word for it, either; here's a quote from the Flash basics guide on Scantips: Some people imagine that the delayed result of rear curtain sync causes a sharp stopped image superimposed on top of the blurred image (so is ...


5

The first flash is a metering flash done just before the shutter opens when you are using E-TTL to automatically compute the amount of power used by the flash. With E-TTL II this allows the camera to combine the distance info from focusing with the amount of light returned from the metering flash. This allows the reflectivity of the subject to be taken into ...


4

There are a couple of more downsides for second-curtain sync not yet mentioned in other responses. With TTL, flash power needed for correct exposure is determined by measuring reflection from a preflash before the shutter opens. Using rear-curtain flash, the distance between subject and the flash may have significantly changed during exposure and the ...


4

No. Unfortunately the 5D2 does not allow 2nd Curtain Sync unless there is an attached to Canon EX compatible speedlite. It's unfortunate as the only solutions seem to be workarounds, or expensive radio triggers.


4

Nikon refers to this as rear curtain sync. You can turn it on by holding down the flash button and turning the command dial to move between the different flash modes available. Rear curtain sync is available in Program-Auto, Aperture priority, and Manual modes. Check out the D80 manual for more info: http://www.nikonusa.com/pdf/manuals/dslr/D80_en.pdf ...


4

I've always heard it called "rear curtain" too. Here's the blurb from DPS: http://digital-photography-school.com/slow-sync-flash A key difference from front (first) curtain is that movement blur will seem to end at the solid image instead of begin, so people and objects will appear to be moving in the direction they actually were rather than the opposite.


3

There's custom function in some Canon models (I think 30D and 1Dm2 has it): "15: Shutter Curtain Sync (Flash Mode) is how you select rear-curtain sync to make moving objects look like they're moving in the right direction, presuming you're using a slow shutter speed in Tv, Av or M modes. 0: 1st curtain: Flash fires as soon as the shutter opens. 1: 2nd ...


3

There are essentially two kinds of "slow synchro" flash: front curtain and rear curtain. Most point-and-shoot cameras only support front curtain. The flash fires immediately when you press the shutter button, and the shutter stays open a little while longer to capture more ambient light. Most "serious" cameras also offer rear curtain flash. When you ...


3

Addressing your second question: I often photograph performers using fire - fire jugglers, fire-staff spinners, fire-poi, and the like. Flash is useful in these situations to light the face and hands, so the photos aren't just streaks of orange lines. Second-curtain flash is useful to make the streak of flames appear to recede into the "past", which is ...


2

I'm pretty sure that Scott Kelby means slow sync in general as opposed to the normal flash modes, not first curtain vs. trailing curtain slow sync. From the context (see excerpt in google books), although he talks about the timing of the shutter, he really only contrasts to normal operation. I searched the rest of the book too, and he never talks about ...


2

It's unclear to me if you are trying to conserve battery power, or are looking for a mode which will encourage your camera to use a low amount of light output even though it has no manual control. If it is this latter that you want, it probably isn't the raw amount of power you want to control, but the amount of power relative to the other sources of ...


2

My experiments with K-5 and K100d Super show that yes, you can certainly set it up this way; it may or might not work that way. I tried it out with a Pentax K-5 (firmware 1.01, repeated after upgrade to 1.13 - most recent), Metz 58AF-1 (firmware v3.0 - most recent), and Lensbaby (as manual as a lens can get). This combination can be set up in the described ...


1

There is no reason that a rear (second curtain) flash should reveal more of the background than a front (first curtain) flash should. The second image you post looks much more like a higher ISO that didn't use a flash. You can see that the highlights on the face in the right come from behind the bar, not the on camera flash (which is where they come from ...


1

I think you're confusing the pre-flash as two bursts of flash. There is only one flash burst that actually exposes the photograph. The initial burst you may have seen. Is just to allow the Speedlite to measure the reflective surface, and distance of the subject you're photographing. The initial flash is typically fired at 1/32 power on the 580 EXii. But ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible