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13

The people who make TinEye have a product called PixMatch which can search individual collections. It's not implemented as a desktop application, though — it's a server-based API. And it appears to be priced for serious enterprise use, not for individuals. So that's there, but not really an answer. But a competing company does have something for the desktop ...


12

Try Google Goggles if your phone can do it. You take a picture and Google looks up what it is. You mileage may vary but it works for reasonably well known location even with not so direct framing.


12

I have had some success posting pictures on Flickr asking for help identifying what it is, tagging with anything relevant possible.


8

You could try using TinEye Reverse Image Search to see if there are some similar pictures, perhaps those have some description nearby.


8

Simply do a wildcarded search for JPEGs (*.jpg), narrowed down by date; all OSs have this functionality. You might have to do a bit of manual looking through, but this may jog your memory and help you narrow down the date range anyway.


8

Our very own Itai runs Neocamera, which has such a list.


5

The most comprehensive listing of Micro Four-thirds lens I am aware of is at this posting on the Micro 4/3rds Photography blog: http://m43photo.blogspot.com/2010/01/micro-four-thirds-lens-lineup.html. Despite the misleading dateline from when this blog post was originally published, the post is regularly updated as new lenses become available.


5

Find out the capture date. Then check on shots you took before and after this one. Also be sure to look into your calendar/diary (if you have one) to see where you were at that time. That's the only way I can think of.


4

Flickr has quite a good map feature for photos that have geo-tagging info: http://www.flickr.com/map/


4

After looking for a while I found the perfect solution. This program does exactly what I wanted and it's free: http://www.duplicate-finder.com/photo.html


4

ImgSeek is an open-source project that claims to do this. DigiKam is apparently trying to add similar functionality. Pixcavator is not open source, but there is a 30 day free trial.


4

The only way I know how to explicitly do this is with Smart Collections. With Smart Collections, you have the ability to choose either AND or OR semantics when configuring your criteria. There is another good thread on this subject here: Good Uses for Lightroom's Smart Collections Outside of smart collections, you can use the "Text" search mode in the ...


3

The technology certainly exists, as you mention TinEye has the functionality to find a high res image based on a low res sample, but I don't know of any desktop implementation of that approach. Your best bet is probably to do an advanced search based on date, working out the most accurate date you can from memory (when you uploaded to Facebook). Narrow it ...


3

I have not found a direct way to do this, however using a Collection one can come pretty close. Using a Smart Collection one can create multiple rules to define what is included in a collection of images. To create a Smart Collection follow these steps: In the Library Module press the + (add) button in the Collections section, typically on the left side. ...


3

If the photo was geotagged, then at least you can find out where it was taken. That might be enough to help you identify the subject. (In this case, it almost certainly would, as it's a landscape shot). Some cameras have GPS/geotagging built-in. Some can do it with an add-on module. If you have synchronized clocks and a standalone GPS, you can get software ...


3

You should decouple three programming concerns. (I use Linux commands, but they work with Cygwin and MinGW, too). Finding and listing files. This can be done with find -iname "..." through folders. Extracting EXIF data. This can be done with exiftool. 1+2 can be easily coupled with xargs. E.g. this command lists all tags related to "Date" (it is one ...


3

If you are on Linux or willing to boot a Linux LiveDVD, you can use simple commands for that, something in the line of: find -iname "*.jpg" -print0 | xargs -0 exiftool -a | grep "Image Width" find is used for searching for files, iname is used for case insensitive filename matching, print0 basically uses \0 character terminated filenames as outputs, so ...


3

Doing a lens search on dpreview.com for current micro four-thirds lenses finds 52 lenses here


2

If you have some programming chops you can try your hand at using LibPuzzle, but there does seem to be some software (that requires Adobe Bridge) called Imense that will do this. Hopefully Google will one day integrate their similar image searching mechanisms from google search into Picasa. For now they have an "Experimental" feature that allows for the ...


2

Panoramio You either enter a name (ex: 'statue of liberty') or use the interactive map. Some of the same images are available in Google Maps. You only need to go to where you want and enable the 'Photos' option from the overview thumbnail on the upper right of the map.


2

Enable Filters (in the Library menu), select the Metadata filter, then choose the "GPS Data" filter. There, you can select "No coordinates." Of course, if there are no coordinates, it's not geotagged. Similarly, you can use any of the location filters ("Location," "City," "State/Province," and "Country") and choose "Unknown..." to filter for those with no ...


2

It actually works the way you would expect, it's just not documented (at least as far as I know...I had to experiment to figure this out). In library module, grid mode, enable Text search. Choose Keywords -> Contain, and type in "Max !Maddie". You should get a list of results that contain the keyword Max exclusive of the keyword Maddie. Now, that is not ...


1

The problem was solved by restarting Adobe Bridge and then clicking the little pen icon next to the metadata IPTC core info, and also waiting for the messages on the bottom left "Rebuilding index". Also I had to use the menu find, not the quick search, and select "metadata" and check the box "include non-indexed files" Wow, they really make it hard.


1

As Jack mentioned, it's very hard for software to do exactly what you describe--to "know" what a parrot is and what different pictures of a parrot could look like. That kind of pattern matching may be intuitive to humans, but it's much harder for a computer to think like that. If you want to search for photos that are "similar to each other" in a way that ...


1

You could try Google search by image. It allows you to upload an image and Google will try to find similar images of it. You can find a detailed explanation with instructions here.


1

Bradford's anser is a good idea, so I accepted his answer. But adding a separate rule for each year in Lightroom takes too many clicks for my taste. I've found that if I right-click on a smart collection in Lightroom 3 I can choose "export smart collection settings" to save the smart collection's rules into an .lrsmcol file. That turns out to be a text ...


1

If you were on mac or unix I'd have suggested an implementation of basically what @ElendilTheTall answered with. But Windows... yeah, not my favorite place to work so not sure how to go about doing it. BUT, LightRoom has a free 30 day trial. You could download that, throw all your images in it and then use it's filtering to slice and dice your way to the ...


1

I like @ElendilTheTall's answer, but: I recommend a thumbnail viewing program like Irfanview's thumbnail viewer. Open the program, hit "T" for thumbnail view (or File > Thumbnails). You then have a folder tree on the left and thumbnails on the right. This is a quick way to view images within a folder, and it lets you skip folders you know it isn't in. The ...


1

I have Lightroom 3, and here's how you do it there (perhaps someone with LR 2 could verify if this behavior is the same): In the Library module, show the filter bar, choose Text. There are two dropdowns and a text entry box. The first dropdown should read Keywords. Set the second dropdown to Contains All (as opposed to simply Contains), and then enter ...



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