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by Bart Arondson

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11

Short answer: no. Long answer: no. Your Fujitsu point and shoot camera has a much lower throughput than your card's max, so the bottleneck with shooting lots of pictures very, very quickly will be the camera itself, not the memory card. Additionally, there will be absolutely no difference in image of video quality... this is digital after all.


11

The only sure thing I know is that it will use most of the whole card. The number has to be an estimate since the size of files is variable as you noted. They probably account for other issues too like fragmentation and prefer erring on the safe side. As you advance, the estimate usually gets better. You may notice that sometimes you take a shot and the ...


10

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SDHC#.C3.97_rating Class 4 is 32MBit/s (4MByte/s) and Class 6 is 48MBit/s (6MByte/s). You probably shouldn't worry about this if you're just shooting JPEGs, but if you're going to take RAW shots in quick succession, or, as you said, take video, it may make a difference. I can't speak for all camera manufacturers, but if the ...


8

What does the computer say about its capacity? Is there still a 16GB partition, or has it perhaps been resized? Are you still recording RAW only, or perhaps RAW+FINE? (I guess not though since my 16GB card shows 440 images as well for RAW (14-bit lossless compression), but still 312 for RAW+FINE) Did you put another card into the second card slot and chose ...


8

In my camera, that's what I have, and I have no problems. At worst, your transfer speeds may be slower. But it will most definitely not affect the images captured.


8

The GoPro HD Hero 2 states on the FAQ page: You will need to get a class-4 or higher SD card from a reputable brand and source in order to use the camera effectively. A class-10 SD card is recommended when using Time-Lapse mode or photo every 0.5 seconds. Class 4 isn't that fast by today's standards, and actually equates to 4MB/s read/write speeds. The ...


6

Reliability, brand, exclusivity determine the price of memory card. SanDisk, for example, has multiple series, usually with different colors. Blue ones are low end and not entirely reliable. Black ones are more durable, usually labelled 'Extreme' and red 'Ducati' edition which are modified extreme with additional durability and performance testing. The red ...


6

SDHC cards get a class rating (6, 8, 10) which denotes how fast the card can transfer data, higher class cards will transfer data faster and for that reason cost more money. However the 3 cards you've linked to are all class 10. The other difference between them is quality, cheaper cards are more likely to fail sooner in my experience. I've had a search ...


6

I found myself in the same boat about a year ago, and I considered picking up an SD-to-CF adapter to use SD cards in my camera. All the research I did, however, showed really spotty results for these adapters, so I bagged that idea and bought a couple CF cards and a USB card reader for the CF cards. The ultimate driver for me was reliability. At the end ...


5

Ensure you have the current images copied off via Nikon Transfer with your D90 connected directly to your computer, then I would suggest using the D90 to format the entire memory card to remove any pre-installed software and/or directories. This should resolve any access issues when putting the memory card in to a card reader. On the D90 there are two ...


4

Rob Galbraith has put together an enormous database of CF and SD performance metrics in various cameras. It starts here with an extremely thorough explanation of how the cards work, and then a database organized by camera. I'm pretty sure you'll be able to see how your cards stack up to the others there. He doesn't have the D7000 up yet, but I'd suspect ...


4

Canon's User Guide (and Wikipedia and dpreview) list the camera as compatible with SDHC cards, which has a maximum size of 32GB. It'd be unusual for something to list as SDHC compatible and not be, and a quick google for memory card problems didn't turn up much of anything. I'd feel pretty confident using any SDHC card.


4

Rob Galbraith did an experiment with a Canon 450D here which may be useful to you: http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/camera_multi_page.asp?cid=6007-9424 He seems to suggest the camera will write at max of 11-14MB's. The 450D has a similar sized sensor (similar size photo) and the same image processor so your 1000D will be similar. If you shoot in JPG a high ...


4

There are two basic types of flash memory: Single-level cell (SLC) and multi-level cell (MLC). By using multiple voltage levels to store information, MLC memory can pack more data into the same area of silicon, bringing price down. However, this improved density causes disadvantages when it comes to read/write speeds and write endurance. Therefore, ...


4

Rob Galbraith has a full spread of tests with just about every popular card for this camera. To sum up the results, the fastest card is the SanDisk Extreme Pro 8GB SDHC card. It performed at 27.7MB/s JPEG and 26.4MB/s RAW for a burst of 39 shots in 30 seconds. The speed test was performed by shooting 17 JPEG Fine and then 10 NEF files. More info can be ...


4

According to DPreview it supports SD and SDHC cards. This includes all the classes of these cards. The classes only differ from each other regarding write speeds. Here is more information on that. As the D40x can not record video, a class 10 card is not necessary. A lower speed card is sufficient to take pictures.


4

See this dpreview thread. Consensus seems to be that for the Nikon D5100 class 6 is fine for single shots, but you really need class 10 if you want to do burst shots (Continuous Mode). A class 10 will also allow faster transfers to your PC. I wouldn't expect switching to class 10 to improve your battery life. Your card has very little battery consumption ...


4

There is likely a hidden folder on the card somewhere that is using up your space. Using a utility like DaisyDisk on the Mac will help identify the missing space, and let you clean it up. I have found that some cards have ".Trashes" folder that gets created and keeps copies of a bunch of junk you've deleted in the past. removing this folder will let you ...


3

The speed at which you can import the photos is governed by the card type and the cable you use to connect to your computer, so first make sure you have the fastest type of card available. Lexar make a Firewire 800 card reader which is stackable, so you can link two or more together as FW800 allows you to daisy chain devices in series. If you use a Mac you ...


3

As the files vary in size, the camera can only guess how many photos there are room for, and different cameras of course have slightly different methods of guessing. What I have noticed with my Canon DSLRs is that they use some kind of projected average size to calculate the number of photos left based on the memory amount left, and the average size is ...


3

Toshiba is a reputable company that does put out quality products. At one time they have even had claims to fame for the fastest SD cards(source). If you are looking for the cheapest of the cheap, I do not know why you are necessarily asking this question. They are not a popular brand of memory cards, so you will not find many reviews(if any). If you are ...


3

If you are looking for a more credible or official source stating what SD card works the best with the GoPro Hero 2, I would look no further then the EyeOfMine website. They are a very well known company that produces their own aftermarket accessories for GoPro cameras. I doubt you could find a company with more experience modifying and getting the most out ...


3

Making this an answer by request. This post is basically a duplicate, although that's not necessarily a terrible thing. Earlier questions are: How can I recover deleted photos from an SD Card? How can I recover photo files from a memory card with a corrupt filesystem?


3

4 GB Nikon SD (received with a D5000): read: ~7 MB/s write: ~3 MB/s 16 GB SanDisk Ultra 100x SDHC: read: ~20 MB/s write: ~12 MB/s 2 GB Kingston microSD: read: ~18 MB/s write: ~10 MB/s Both were tested on a Transcend P8 card reader, in "optimize for performance" mode.


3

It is compatible. All cameras supporting SDXC also accept SDHC and SD. SD cards are limited to 2 GB. SDHC to 32 GB and SDXC have a theoretical limit of 2 TB. SDXC memory cards also usually use a different file-system which is exFAT, rather than FAT. In the case of 16GB, it is always SDHC. Although it would be possible to make a 16GB SDXC cards, no one does ...


3

It sounds to me like your card is dead or damaged. I recommend that you follow the instructions in the comments to your question and try to recover what you can. Memory cards fail, it does not happen very often for most people, but it does happen. I have had 3 die over the last 10 years. You can check to see if your card has a warranty or guarantee of some ...


2

Your entire existing infrastructure is geared towards SD cards, so why change? CF cards are generally more robust, which may or may not be a factor for you. Personally I find a 1 year life for that adapter extremely short, for me it would be enough reason to not get another one (but maybe there are other makes and models out there that are higher quality). ...


2

Because the file size is variable, the camera can't calculate how many pictures will fit in the remaining card space. In my experience with the Nikon D7000 and Olympus E-510, these cameras seem to devide the remaining space on the card by a predetermined file size that depends on the image quality settings (RAW, JPEG, compression, size). This predetermined ...


2

Although the above answer covers the recovery perfectly - I'd add that after recovering any images from this card, I'd destroy it and be very careful regarding replacement. I have seen cheap cards that mis-report their capacity: They say they are 2 gig, they are actually 1 gig, once you write more than 1 gig - they start from the beginning again, wiping the ...


2

Don't forget, that the USB channel has bandwidth limitations. USB 2.0 spec High Speed is 480 Mbps (megabits per second). This means that an 8GB card can theoretically transfer in 134 seconds. Firewire 800, can do this in 80 seconds (Firewire 400 in 160 sec). Now, this is theoretical, because every USB or Firewire device connnected utilizes bandwidth. If ...



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