Incense

by Bart Arondson

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27

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


11

Yes; I have an EyeFi card and my battery doesn't even stand 50% of its performance. Fortunately I can turn EyeFi-wireless-mode off in my Nikon's D3200 menu. It's described in the user manual here:


10

The write-protect lock on an SD card is a very small plastic slider on the side of the card itself. It should be labeled as such, probably in fine print. (File modified from original on Wikicommons by Afrank99; CC-BY-SA 2.0) As you can see from the arrow in the picture, slide down to lock, or up to unlock. Note that if the switch breaks off, that will ...


7

Your camera is probably not the best or fastest USB memory card reader you can own, so even if you are using the fastest card you can buy and the camera claims to be using the fastest USB protocol your computer can handle, it's not very likely that it will give you the best data transfer speeds. A high-quality, high-speed external USB card reader (there's no ...


6

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less ...


6

The problem is that those reasons don't apply and if they did more consumers would be willing to pay out for better cameras with those features and the others that come with more expensive kit. If an SD card becomes corrupt, an amateur has plenty of time to change cards and less need to guarantee capturing the action such as at an event. If an amateur ...


5

The cards are considerably more complicated electronically. Additional power would be needed to drive the ARM processor vs. a typical SD controller. Once you add in Wi-Fi radio and the encryption requirements that come with it you should expect an impact on battery life (though most cards now shut down Wi-Fi when it is not transmitting which helps.) The ...


5

As far as I know, all digital cameras produced to be sold on the retail market incorporate the Design rule for Camera File System (DCF). Part of the DCF standard is that the FAT file system must be used by compliant devices. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera ...


5

The primary reason is that the market has not demanded it. For users in the consumer model range, it seems they prefer either the lower price allowed by a single card slot or other features for the same increase in price. It is relatively easy to swap one card for another when the photos you are taking are not 'mission critical'. If one SD card becomes ...


5

It comes down to resolving "is there a market?" and "what are the barriers to adoption?". Each of those presents a huge barrier to adoption even if it were worthwhile. NTFS would incur costs for licencing even if a suitable library even exists for the camera's processors (which is not guaranteed) and support outside of Windows would be patchy. While HFS+ ...


4

One obvious reason: because a journaling filesystem on a camera very likely would not have helped you (or anyone). As a very high level overview, here's what a journaling filesystem does: Before each write to the metadata (or data, if data-journaled as well), first write what you're going to change to the journal. Only once you're sure that's on disk, go ...


4

SD cards are very safe when stored in their original plastic container at room temperature in a dry place. The same is generally true of Lithium Ion batteries. Protecting the metal contacts on the SD card and battery will prevent the majority of damage to either device, either through corrosion, physical damage, or electrical short. Storing the memory card ...


3

From the symptoms you describe a virus is highly unlikely. Physical damage is a high possibility. When placed the card in the wallet, if you then placed the wallet in your back pocket and sat down this could have put significant stress on the card resulting in damage. If this is the case card is probably beyond economical recovery. If there is any ...


3

Journaled File systems are bad for SD cards (or any NAND Flash device). Write operations are expensive for NAND Flash devices and journaled file systems tend to write more than non-journaled file systems for the same activities. So the SD card will work slower and will last less with a Journaled file system. FLASH-based storage, at its core, uses a ...


3

I'm the bearer of bad news: Despite what other have suggested, the answer to your question is NO. Lightroom (3,4 and 5) does not support Moving images from SD card. See P39 of the Lightroom 5 manual: In the top center of the import window, specify how you want to add the photos to the catalog: Copy as DNG Copies camera raw files to the folder ...


3

There's no doubt about the benefits of having dual memory cards, but I suspect that the added size and complexity of dual slots is understated. The Nikon D7x00 series has a card door that's the same size as those for CF cards, while the old dual-slot Sony SLRs had a space many times the thickness of the cards between them. But what I want to answer is this: ...


2

It is not only about market demands, but also a market competition matter. For example, up to until Pentax started making prosumer weather-sealed DSLRs no one bothered to make ones. Now every major maker to my knowledge have a weather-sealed mid-range DSLR. Just wait until someone does a dual card mid-range camera and you'll see what will happen after. ...


2

Different file systems require different amount of RAM in a system that is using them. A system that needs to write a file to a FAT file system could in theory get by with a single 512-byte buffer, though performance would be pretty dreadful. Expanding to two or three 512-byte buffers would improve things enormously. Going beyond that would improve things ...


2

Turns out to be a setting in the Registry, look at: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\StorageDevicePolicies If there is a value WriteProtect, set it to 0, if not, create it as a DWORD and set it to 0 Solution found at kioskea.net


2

Moving the card between cameras is not likely to cause a problem. I think that's just a red herring. You might try some different recovery tool, but it seems likely that what you've gotten is as good as it's going to get. Time to get another card, and in the future remember to upload to a computer frequently and keep backups.


1

I had the same issue. It is a possibility that you have indeed some hidden files. To delete them you should format your storage card. On a canon you can do that in the menu. Click on the menu button Go to the wrench icon which is displayed on an orange background. Go to format Enter it by clicking on the set on your camera You can choose to do a low ...


1

The clue is in the title of the support article which is "What memory cards have been tested for use in the Nikon D3100?" and not "What memory cards have known to be incompatible with the Nikon D3100?" Nikon are not saying that the 32GB SanDisk cards (SDHC/SDXC) are not compatible, only that Nikon have not tested them. SanDisk appear to have tested their ...


1

Benchmark the card read/write speeds on your (or someone else's) computer. Class 10 should read & write at speeds of at least 10 MB/sec. For stable recording at 1080p@30fps, you probably need about 6 MB/sec minimum write speed. If the card isn't performing at its specified rate, then this could be your problem. You could use something like hdtune on ...


1

You don't say what operating system or software you are using, but here is my suspicion: some program is configured to detect the insertion of a memory card and to look on that card for new images to import. When you insert the card, it does this, and then automatically unmounts the card so it can be safely removed. If you don't want this, you can probably ...


1

Finally got my hands on a D7100 and tried out the option to copy images from one memory card to another. The camera will let you select a folder to copy or individual images. You then select a location to copy to. Here you can select a folder on the other memory card. I took a minute or two to copy 350 raw files using 90MB/s SD cards. If you then ...


1

Just a side note: slowness during making night shots may be due to noise reduction... The data transfer speed is easy to calculate. Take a picture of your choice (e.g. RAW with 12-bit, uncompressed - just an example), and see the file size of that. (Or average the sizes of the pictures you have made - or find the worst case size.) Now, when you make ...


1

1, God cannot save you, if you physically lost the card. What do you mean you lost a card in Bali? 2, Journaled FSs are built for occasions like sudden OS-failure or sudden power-failure. They keep the FS meta-data consistent, when those bad things happen. They are not helping if you want your deleted files come back. 3, Bad-block is the most vital problem ...


1

Assuming the card was simply corrupted, and you haven't tossed it or overwritten it, I strongly suggest you try PhotoRec. (It got me out of a slightly less bad situation a few months ago. It even found a few images that had survived being deleted for a year or two.) http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec Regarding a journaling FS, I've had the same ...


1

Cameras are often programmed to only recognize files produced by the same model. At the very least, they require images in \DCIM\100CANON for example. Make sure to use the exact structure of the camera and name the files with the right format, say PICT0001.JPG. There is a good chance this won't work unless you copy the EXIF from another image produced by ...



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