Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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27

Let's do a little cost benefit analysis: A journaled file system is more complicated - this means longer development time, more bugs, more battery power drain, higher production cost etc. the problem solved by a journaled filesystem - corrupted FS data but file data intact - is handled pretty well by 3rd party data recovery tools. journaled file system ...


11

Journaled file-systems only ensure the integrity of the file-system. If a card truly fails, it fails with the whole file-system. Now if you have some bad memory cells, you would only use whichever photo occupied that space and a journaled file-system would not help either. In other words, this is the wrong solution to the incident you describe. The real ...


9

There is an advantage to Compact-Flash cards which you get with the fastest models and sufficiently fast camera. This is not what accounts for most of the price difference, volume is. SD cards are sold on considerably higher volume than CF ones. When CF cards were more popular, it used to be the opposite. Nowadays, I would not worry at all about this. The ...


7

There are several ways in which an SD card can go bad. Physical Damage First, cards can be actually physically broken. You can bend them in half pretty easily if you try, but in general they're actually pretty resilient. Many are effectively water-proof even if not marketed that way. I've sent cards through the laundry, and once I dropped one full of ...


6

The problem is that those reasons don't apply and if they did more consumers would be willing to pay out for better cameras with those features and the others that come with more expensive kit. If an SD card becomes corrupt, an amateur has plenty of time to change cards and less need to guarantee capturing the action such as at an event. If an amateur ...


6

The main disadvantages are: Slower speeds available in the microSD format as compared to full size SD Additional cost of the microSD format The addition of another piece that can fail, be lost, etc. The microSD cards are so small that some people are afraid of losing them or breaking them easily In today's market, the first two points are typically less ...


5

It comes down to resolving "is there a market?" and "what are the barriers to adoption?". Each of those presents a huge barrier to adoption even if it were worthwhile. NTFS would incur costs for licencing even if a suitable library even exists for the camera's processors (which is not guaranteed) and support outside of Windows would be patchy. While HFS+ ...


5

The primary reason is that the market has not demanded it. For users in the consumer model range, it seems they prefer either the lower price allowed by a single card slot or other features for the same increase in price. It is relatively easy to swap one card for another when the photos you are taking are not 'mission critical'. If one SD card becomes ...


5

As far as I know, all digital cameras produced to be sold on the retail market incorporate the Design rule for Camera File System (DCF). Part of the DCF standard is that the FAT file system must be used by compliant devices. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera ...


4

Free, open source, cross-platform software PhotoRec can specifically recover many RAW formats, including Sony ARW (as well as Canon CR2, Nikon NEF, Pentax PEF, and others). Although the interface isn't particularly slick, the underlying functionality is the same as any proprietary program, and I'd be surprised if any of the more expensive options can ...


4

The main difference in cost probably comes from economies of scale. For a long time SD cards were more expensive, but now they've become cheaper as they've become easier to manufacture and require less materials. Meanwhile, due to their bulk, consumers have fallen out of favor with CF and prefer SD. Additionally, the architecture of the cards is ...


4

One obvious reason: because a journaling filesystem on a camera very likely would not have helped you (or anyone). As a very high level overview, here's what a journaling filesystem does: Before each write to the metadata (or data, if data-journaled as well), first write what you're going to change to the journal. Only once you're sure that's on disk, go ...


3

Journaled File systems are bad for SD cards (or any NAND Flash device). Write operations are expensive for NAND Flash devices and journaled file systems tend to write more than non-journaled file systems for the same activities. So the SD card will work slower and will last less with a Journaled file system. FLASH-based storage, at its core, uses a ...


3

There's no doubt about the benefits of having dual memory cards, but I suspect that the added size and complexity of dual slots is understated. The Nikon D7x00 series has a card door that's the same size as those for CF cards, while the old dual-slot Sony SLRs had a space many times the thickness of the cards between them. But what I want to answer is this: ...


3

I'm the bearer of bad news: Despite what other have suggested, the answer to your question is NO. Lightroom (3,4 and 5) does not support Moving images from SD card. See P39 of the Lightroom 5 manual: In the top center of the import window, specify how you want to add the photos to the catalog: Copy as DNG Copies camera raw files to the folder ...


3

Compactflash cards are much more sturdy. SD cards flex and get squashed, so unless you have them on your camera (like if you carry extra like most serious photographers) it is much better to use CF cards. They also have better bandwidth with more pins, but mostly you wont notice that since the camera interface and cardreaders cannot fully utilize it unless ...


3

Any general file recovery tool will do. For image-centric ones, there are also plenty available. The most popular ones are Image Rescue and Photo Rescue. They each offer a free-trial which shows you thumbnails and guarantee that anything that shows a thumbnail will be recovered once you pay. I can vouch that both of these work and I have seen them recover ...


2

If it's brand new I would just save the time and go back to the shop and complain. If you purchased it on ebay you may want to check: http://sosfakeflash.wordpress.com/2008/09/02/h2testw-14-gold-standard-in-detecting-usb-counterfeit-drives/ Sometimes, some Ebay SD card sellers sell a "16gb card" that actually only has maybe, 32mb", or some other small ...


2

Try fully erasing your card on the computer: If you use Windows: Download the official SD Formatter, enable overwriting from the Options button and proceed to format the card. If you use Mac OS X or most Unix variants: erase the card by running the following command with superuser privileges: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/{whole disk device identifier}. After it ...


2

The one possibility everyone has missed is storing the micro SD card in a hollowed US nickel. I have used this successfully in investigation situations where I knew I would be detained. Most security staff are grossly undereducated for the job, a plus in such a case. You must have several SD cards on you, as well as coins, to be sure to be ready. You also ...


2

There are generally two reasons for corruption... The card is faulty. Cards are so cheap relative to cameras that there is no excuse not to follow the 'if in doubt, throw it out' mantra and then you can replace them with cards that do have a warranty. If cards fail it's normally the 'controller' that fails and it will be completely inaccessible. The card ...


2

You can use a professional service, but I would suggest first trying out a bit more. Of course, this increases the risk of causing more damage! So, if those wide angle shots on there are not worth hundreds of dollars to you, you can't go wrong with trying a bit more yourself. Note, that you are not the only one with a similar problem. Here is a ...


2

I would recommend sending your SD card into a reputable drive recovery service. There isn't much else you can do at this point as a home user unless your skills and equipment is very advanced. One service that I would recommend that is close to Canada(Minnesota) and also very highly regarded is Kroll Ontrack. I am not affiliated with them in any way. The ...


2

Based on your description of the problem, it sounds like the card in question may have a bad block that isn't being masked out by the card's controller. Since most flash cards use some type of wear leveling, the problem will only occur each time the controller attempts to access the bad block. If the card is, for example, an 8GB card that is re-formatted ...


2

It is not only about market demands, but also a market competition matter. For example, up to until Pentax started making prosumer weather-sealed DSLRs no one bothered to make ones. Now every major maker to my knowledge have a weather-sealed mid-range DSLR. Just wait until someone does a dual card mid-range camera and you'll see what will happen after. ...


2

Different file systems require different amount of RAM in a system that is using them. A system that needs to write a file to a FAT file system could in theory get by with a single 512-byte buffer, though performance would be pretty dreadful. Expanding to two or three 512-byte buffers would improve things enormously. Going beyond that would improve things ...


2

Moving the card between cameras is not likely to cause a problem. I think that's just a red herring. You might try some different recovery tool, but it seems likely that what you've gotten is as good as it's going to get. Time to get another card, and in the future remember to upload to a computer frequently and keep backups.


1

Assuming the card was simply corrupted, and you haven't tossed it or overwritten it, I strongly suggest you try PhotoRec. (It got me out of a slightly less bad situation a few months ago. It even found a few images that had survived being deleted for a year or two.) http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec Regarding a journaling FS, I've had the same ...


1

Cameras are often programmed to only recognize files produced by the same model. At the very least, they require images in \DCIM\100CANON for example. Make sure to use the exact structure of the camera and name the files with the right format, say PICT0001.JPG. There is a good chance this won't work unless you copy the EXIF from another image produced by ...


1

Troubleshooting like this is basically a matter of changing one variable at a time. Trying to directly copy from the SD card is a good first step, and testing the cable is good too. I'd still suspect that the cable is the problem, but if you're sure it's not that, it may be either a problem with your laptop's USB port or a software problem on the computer. ...



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