Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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11

There isn't really any RAW format for scanners, but the third party scanner program VueScan for example does actually offer an option to save scans as RAW files. It's really a TIFF file that is saved with minimal changes from the raw scanner data. There is of course also the option of applying some basic corrections in the scanner program, save that as a ...


10

A cheap scanner will take about one minute per negative or photo: that's 3/4 year of full-time work to scan all this stuff, not counting the follow-on postprocessing needed to clean up the scans. If you want to continue living your life, consider shipping this material off to a service, as suggested in a related thread and another and another.


10

I had 10,000 images in my slide and film archives that I wanted to scan. I tried the scanner route but quickly became frustrated with its slowness. So I bought a high quality macro lens and made slide and negative adapters. I then used my DSLR and macro lens to photograph my slide/film collection. My collection has been successfully scanned and I can ...


9

I have a Minolta DiMAGE Elite 5400. It has some very good features: a high resolution, good D-range, probably the easiest to use scanner software I've ever come across, and despite its age it has a USB 2.0 connection. I don't know if it's the best scanner out there, but I know how to use it properly, and that makes a bigger difference if you ask me. ...


8

My guess is that you do not understand what RAW is. RAW files are not images. Information is missing from them to form a complete image and RAW-conversion software interpolates (intelligently guesses) the missing data. There is no such problem with a scanner since you have a complete image already. Therefore it makes NO sense for scanners to output RAW data ...


5

I'm using Nikon Coolscan V ED and I'm very happy with it. Sadly, it has been discontinued and now the only Nikon option is much more expensive Coolscan 9000 ED. There are two Coolscans V on the eBay at the moment but I don't think I would comfortable buying a film scanner on a online auction site ... EDIT: The biggest problem with a second hand scanner is ...


4

This totally depends on the bundled software. My old scanner had really horrible software that required me to follow something like 7 configuration steps in order to scan negative film - and repeat those steps for every single scan, even if I scan several pieces of negative film in a row. On the other side, some high-end scanners come bundled with ...


4

Exif has two fields to store an image description: XPTitle and ImageDescription. What field your scanner use? The below command line (via ExifTool) will erase all of your Exif:Description and Exif:XPTitle fields of the images in the specified directory: exiftool.exe -exif:ImageDescription= -exif:XPTitle= "YOURDIR" Although any decent photo management ...


4

I use jhead for simple things like this. jhead -dc file.jpg will delete the comment field, or you can use jhead -cl "new comment" file.jpg to replace it. It also has a number of options for setting time and date, including taking the new EXIF date from the file's timestamp, or else setting it from the command line. It's open-source software and comes with ...


4

Since you're open to a negative scanner consider the Nikon Super Coolscan 5000ED, it can scan whole rolls of negatives, individual 6-photo strips of negatives or up to 50 slides (in a slide hopper) at a time. I use the 6-photo strip adapter and slide hopper. The 50 slide hopper and negative roll adapter are extra attachments you need to purchase but the ...


4

Fast scanning + Accurate Colour Reproduction without having to post process + Even lighting of the image + $500 USD = :-) ...you must be dreaming, :-) depending of course on what you mean by 'speed' (the main problem) and 'accuracy'. The real option here is Imacon. You have some cheaper solutions in Ken Rockwell's How to Scan Your 3,000 Slide Archive . ...


3

I doubt most people owning such a scanner are willing to part with the parts, as they haven't been in production for a long time and supplier stocks will have depleted years ago (if they could still be found after all the Minolta/Konica/Sony mergers). Your best bet may be to look for someone trying to sell a scanner complete with the parts, either on eBay, ...


3

I'm aware of at least one 3D scanner manufactured by HP called "Top Shot". It uses an array CCD instead of a linescan CCD + scanning mechanism, so it should also capture images faster, although the effective resolution is likely not quite as high as a traditional flat-bed scanner. The downside/upside (depending on your needs) is that the scanner is part of ...


3

You can open up JPG's in Lightroom and edit them in Lightroom just fine, or if you want, I suppose you can convert your jpeg into DNG (kind of pointless really). Just ensure that after you make your corrections in lightroom, you save the file in a lossless format (otherwise you risk double data loss do to recompression). Lightroom isn't specific to RAW ...


3

One of the Canon DR range of page feed scanners will do the job. They come with CapturePerfect software and will crop as well as de-skew. There is a price to be paid though. You will need to guillotine off the book spine so that you can feed the pages into the scanner. Your neighbourhood printer will have a nice industrial size guillotine that will make ...


3

Scantips has some information on this: cleaning scanners (about halfway down the section) but in a nutshell, most scanners can have the top taken off to clean the underside of the glass, but how it comes off will vary from scanner to scanner. It also says, don't mess with anything else, which is probably wise. The article also has cleaning materials ...


3

If you are just looking for a way to digitize your collection, you may mant to consider a scanning service, once they're scanned there isn't much need for the scanner. http://www.scancafe.com is one of the services I've heard of, but I'm sure there are others too.


3

A lot of cameras can be controlled from a computer. Not sure if every camera out there can, but at least in my experience, every camera I used did. I'm sure about DSLRs: all the DSLR cameras from Nikon, Canon and Pentax have such features. I also know for sure that Canon DSLRs are sold with EOS Utility, that allows you to control the camera from your ...


2

I have used two different scanners for this. First, a Minolta DImage Scan Elite 5400. This is a high resolution 35mm scanner which scans strips of negatives (or slides) as well as framed slides. The "5400" refers to the resolution: 5400 ppi. That's pretty high. Second, an Epson Perfection 4990 Photo flatbed scanner. This comes with a number of adapters ...


2

To scan transparent material (such as a negative, or your lantern slide) you need to reveal the light source in the lid of the scanner, by removing the cover that provides the white background for reflective scanning. I think that is what the error message is telling you. Check the instructions in the manual. You can simply rest the lantern slide on the ...


2

Advice on your suspected degrading first: store the material properly and it is are more durable than any digital version you create today (the life-time of a harddisk is lower than the life-time of a negative). The only negative effect is that you won't be able to review them today on your PC. On the plus side - you can store them dry, cool and dark for ...


2

How often do you scan at 2400x4800 DPI? My guess is that you don't -- ever, for any practical purpose. The simple fact is that virtually no input contains anywhere close to that fine of detail. Most photographic prints, for example, are only good for around 300 DPI at most (and 150-200 is more realistic in most cases). Unless you're really using the highest ...


2

This behaviour is not normal. Aperture should write the assosiated source file(s) to the directory you specify in the export dialog, depending on the options probably in a subfolder named by the project. So something goes severly wrong. For troubleshooting I suggest you check the following things: Does this happen to all photos or only to one/some? Is the ...


1

Having the same problem, I was thinking of buying a macro lens for my DSLR, making a simple device to hold the slide against a properly illuminated background and shooting with the remote control of the camera. This device should be a "drop-pick" type, where the slide does not need any enclosure, locking or adjustment. Once the tests are done, I hope I can ...


1

I'm in a similar boat (looking for a photo scanner with automatic photo (document) feeder). But in my case I do not have negatives. So far the only candidate I have found which: Appears to be available to purchase in the UK Definitely supports the automatic scanning of a "stack" of photos ...is the HP ScanJet 5500C. I'm going to try and pick one up ...


1

Using a scanner as a camera is no abuse at all, Scanography is certainly photography and arguably an art form. In order to achieve the necessary DoF, you will need a scanner with a CCD sensor. The newer (and thinner) ones use a CIS sensor and thus have a very shallow DoF. Just keep in mind that most CCD scanners are going to be more expensive. You may want ...


1

There are scanners that are advertised as having 3D object scan ability. A search at Google came up with an example. I believe the DoF should be deep enough for your needs.


1

Is there any software that will allow me to scan said photograph and capture it as RAW so I can use Lightroom 3 to perform some corrections on it? Yes, there is a 'scan too raw' setting in Xsane scanning software. I use it to capture the most image data from my Canon FS2710 slide scanner. The options for slides are to scan 'to colour' or 'to raw'. ...


1

I bought the Canon Canoscan LiDE 210. I wanted a scanner that rapidly went through photographs from old photo albums but had better quality than the little 600 dpi autofeed jobs like the Kodaks (which are rapid and great, but low quality). Unfortunately, the Canon CanoScan is not the answer. It says it does 4800 dpi in 10 secs on the box, but in reality ...



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