Incense

by Bart Arondson

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46

Saturation boosts all colours by the same amount whilst vibrance aims to boost the least saturated colours whilst leaving already saturated colours where they are. The intent of increasing vibrance is to increase the apparent colourfulness of an image without overdoing parts that are already saturated, e.g. skintones.


19

The type of lighting, the way the subject reflects light, presence of haze, the lens design and coatings and the dyes used in the sensor all have an influence on the vividness of colours in an image. But the major factor, which outweighs all of these by a significant margin, is how the image is processed. Either in camera or on a PC the saturation settings ...


17

This is an observation made by many when they start to shoot in raw after being used to JPEG. You have to understand that what you see with a raw image is exactly what came off the sensor when you took the picture. Digital cameras provide all kinds of on board post processing such as noise reduction, sharpening, saturation and contrast settings which are ...


16

There's really no such thing as an "unaltered" photograph. Unless you're going to pin a piece of undeveloped film to the wall. Certain film stock is designed to give exaggerated colours and there are film processing techniques (e.g. cross processing) to do the same. A digital camera cannot detect colour directly, only intensity. Sensors have a mosaic of ...


14

I think the word you're looking for is "saturated". In any case, this looks to me like it was taken with a fairly wide-angle lens from quite close up (note the rather exaggerated perspective of the tray). The saturated colors are largely a result of fairly careful lighting, in this case from the right of the camera. Especially if you're accustomed to ...


14

It is difficult to answer the question accurately without knowing what you really photographed. But what you have reported is very similar to what many photographers experience when photographing red flowers. This has a two fold cause. First the CMOS sensor in the camera has an extended spectral response extending into the near infrared. See the diagram ...


13

No, there are really no such rules. This is where having an eye for these things comes in, either through a natural ability or through practice (or both). It is subjective, but not arbitrary, and it's art but not a black art. Eventually, you'll develop a personal style for what feels right to you. Many photographers develop a very distinctive personal look. ...


12

Most decisions are artistic ones, and depend on your own personal style and vision, and to some extent the genre of photography, whether it's landscape or portraits, commercial or non-commercial. Before you start, you need to have some idea of what you want your image to look like. High key or low key? Sharp and contrasty, or light and ethereal? Every ...


12

As Guffa said, the red channel is blown. All the RGB values are (255,0,0) In the other red parts of the image, it's more like (190, 35, 40) and all the red, green and blue luminance values fluctuate and there is some texture/detail/noise. Histogram of the blown area: And of the nearby red area:


9

From a technical standpoint, "saturation" is the extent of chromaticity for a certain hue...the hue's "colorfulness". Technically speaking, pink would be a less colorful magenta, but roughly the same hue, where as red would be a distinct and colorful hue on its own. You might think of light rose or salmon to be less colorful variations of red. When it comes ...


9

In addition to what Jerry and labnut mentioned, you can apply so called S-curves in Photoshop's tone curve utility. Of course this also applies for the Gimp and many other tools. This will boost the contrast and saturation even more. It can be used as an alternative or alongside with the Soft Light layer technique described by labnut.


9

Contrary to popular belief, extremely bright light often desaturates colors a bit. In theory, the brightness isn't what matters, but directionality does, and extremely bright light also tends to be directional. As a rule, you'll get brighter, more intense colors under a cloudy sky than under a clear sky. There are (at least) two major reasons for this. The ...


9

There is nothing wrong with your Aperture setup. RAW files are like film negatives, they need to be processed so they can be viewed/displayed as intended. Your camera does not show the RAW file when you press play and preview the image but rather a JPEG image that has been processed in-camera. This is known as a sidecar file. The software that came with ...


8

The quality and makeup of the lens elements used in a camera lens can have an effect on transmission. Top-notch glass will usually have high transmission, allowing through as much visible light as possible while filtering as little as possible. However, top-notch glass will also usually have coatings, usually multi-coating, that will have its own effect on ...


7

The 550D has something called "picture styles" - you can use those to get more saturated pictures in JPEG right out of the camera. Picture styles are presets you can set to control the image processing settings in-camera, there are 5 color pictures styles, one black and white and 3 user defined styles. One of the things you can set in a picture style is ...


7

There is really no way to objectively analyze the saturation of photos from any brand of camera. There are far too many factors involved, far to many layers of indirection, that create a lot of "noise" that obscures an objective result. A lot of review sites certainly try to produce as objective of comparisons as they can, such as DPReview and DXOLabs, ...


7

I think the real reason this image looks the way it does is by use of a high contrast and saturated processing. Take my own example. This is the default development settings for this raw file in Lightroom. But by drastically increasing the contrast, the saturation, blacks and highlights pops out.


6

Jerry's answer is spot-on, diffused white lighting with good white balance is essential. The next best opportunity for controlling your colour saturation is at the RAW to jpeg conversion. Your final opportunity is in Photoshop/Gimp but I have found it is best to do it at the RAW conversion stage. In my case, since I use Ufraw, these instructions are ...


6

I can tell you how this was shot, assuming "no special lighting equipment" is true: Choose to shoot on an overcast day, or cloudy (but not dim) day. Shoot outdoor Have the model look straight or slightly up, so the top of her eye reflects the sky, giving the highlight The lips are not that shinny unless you put some lip gloss on. So I think that is a ...


6

No, not really. As @jrista said, RAW is not an image, so you are never seeing a RAW file, what you are seeing is what the software you use is showing you. Some viewing software show you RAW files by using the embedded JPEG image and will therefore show you exactly what your JPEG settings are set to. Software is involved in the preview of RAW files and, ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


5

The only fair way to compare something like saturation is a RAW-to-RAW comparison under conditions and settings that are as faithfully-duplicated as possible. As others have mentioned, saturation is one of the things that's typically affected during image processing -- even the processing done in-camera when a JPG file is created (thus, most users don't ...


5

The right answer is "check your user manual". Your camera has a lot of potential, and learning to navigate its various options will help you take better photos. Another "right" answer is to shoot in RAW mode and adjust things like color saturation as necessary for each photo using a good photo editing program (Lightroom, Aperture, etc.). That may be more ...


5

I can see two possibilities that aren't related to post-processing either in or out of camera. First, increase the light, either through changing the scene or by using wider aperture and longer shutter — and thereby lowering the required ISO. This doesn't seem exactly in the spirit of your question, though. So, second: let the darker scenes be themselves. ...


4

RAW is a rather ambiguous beast when it comes to post processing. Fundamentally, a RAW image is simply the direct results for each bayer pixel as read off the sensor. As such, the pixel data stored in a RAW file is not directly viewable on a computer screen...it must first be processed to transform (interpolate) bayer pixels into screen pixels. Not every RAW ...


4

Lenses have very minor effects on colors. One can usually measure them but not see them so easily. The saturation part of your question has to do with exposure. In particular, the blue channel appears to be clipped which you can see by looking at the blue histogram in a photo application like Lightroom on Windows/Mac and Geeqie on Linux. Softness on the ...


4

Yes, the red light is totally blown out, and that is simply the whole issue. It looks to be more in focus, because you are seeing the point where it gets clipped as an edge. The blown area looks flat, and the edge around that area looks like it is almost in focus. We are used to seeing areas where all color components are blown out to white, not so often ...


4

Possibly the area was painted with fluorescent red paint, also known by the brand name Day-Glo. Standard red paint just reflects the red component of incident light. Fluorescent red paint in addition converts high frequencies (UV) to red, thereby boosting brightness. High brightness can cause overexposure, in this case in the red channel. To avoid that, ...


3

To get a nice demonstration of this effect, see this page, comparing the EF-50/1.4 with the EF-50/1.8. UPDATE: The drink cans test and the playground test on the page, actually comparing the bokeh and background blur, show how the f/1.4 gives more saturated reds and blues than the f/1.8 lens, both wide open and on f/2, f/5.6. This page was the reason I ...



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