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by Bart Arondson

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7

Not having owned a cheap-o ring flash, I can only guess what the tradeoffs might be: Cheaper build quality Inconsistent Light Output No "Bang-bang-bang" shooting Little/no camera interfacing (ie no support for Canon's E-TTL) Weaker light output Now, for $50, if you can swing it, it seems like it might be worth it to first try using a ring-flash and get ...


7

The advantages when used as a main/only light include: your work resembles big budget fashion photography from the 80s (when ringlights were used extensively) you get a crisp detailed look without the big shadows you'd get from a point source. By surrounding the lens you light from all angles simultaneously you eliminate strong shadows, leaving only a ...


7

From what I've seen most of the cheap "macro ring flashes" you find on eBay and places like dealextream aren't really flashes as all - they are led-based continuous lights you can attache to your lens, and as such they aren't very powerful - they'll may work at very close range but are probably not powerful enough to have any effect at normal camera-subject ...


6

Ring flashes make for excellent fill-flash, especially when you're using a high, hard key. Usually that'd lead to severe raccoon-eyes, but with a ringflash you can lighten the shadows in the eye sockets without introducing a new, directional, lightsource. This guide goes over a couple of different scenarios using a ringflash as fill It's also used as an ...


6

In my opinion flash tends to be better than a tripod for macro as you get more control, faster shutter speeds and you can close the aperture really far down. That's not to say you can't get good results with available light. You can also get good results without a dedicated macro ringlight, if you have a off camera cord. This will let you get your 430EX ...


6

I've just bought a Ray Flash adapter, and it looks like it might easily work for macro as well. All the TTL abilities of your regular flash still work, which is nice.


3

All the things Alan said, plus the more expensive ring flashes give you more control over the lighting ratio - generally the left and right sides are separate bulbs and you can set one to fire brighter than the other. Additionally, they can act as master flash units, whereby you can set up other flash units to synchronise wirelessly with the main ...


3

I tend to do both, quite often... In terms of the ring flash, it's around the lens, so the light is more accurately focussed on the subject and, for that matter, is closer to the subject. This is especially handy when the distance to the subject from the front element of the lens is very tight as another form of flash is going to be angled quite off axis, ...


3

There are several tutorials available to how to construct your own DIY ringflash: Pentax Forums: The "Fring" Digital Photography School: DIY Ring Flash flickr - jędrek: Cheap Ringflash This one is very sexy: metku.net - Ring Light flickr - iamclaus: LED Ring Light You can easily find many more through a quick search. Not all are macro rings, but it ...


2

The camera is in Auto mode and that setting ignores any other flash settings (or even the presence of an external flash.) It will then automatically use the built in flash without prompting, which is what you're seeing. The flash listed supports i-TTL so it should be fine with the D7000 even if it's not on the Sigma supported camera list (more commonly it ...


1

What is your sync speed? Try shooting at 1/200th of a second or less. I suspect that the flash doesn't support high speed sync, so effectively your flash will fire but won't be synced with your shutter resulting in a dark image.


1

It is most likely simply not bright enough for you settings. LED lights are much dimmer than a strobe, so you have to account for that when taking your picture. Try to increase your aperture and/or lower your shutter speed and/or raise your ISO. All of these will allow more light to reach the sensor. Of course, you haven't posted your settings, so this ...


1

1) Always shoot in manual mode when using external flash. This will solve your problem of on board flash from popping up when external flash is fixed. 2) Keep your ISO to the minimum. Set it to 100 or 200 max. 3) Vary your shutter speed and Aperture to get the right exposure. A tiny hint for beginner in flash Photography: Shutter speed controls the ...


1

In a studio setting, the ring flash makes the subjects eyes look appealing/natural. A ring of light reflecting off the eyeball looks better than a square or some other shape IMHO.


1

It depends on what you are photographing, and how you want to light behave. If you want to get good light no matter is happening with available light, then flash is fantastic. But if the available light is working for you, use it. A ring light creates a bigger light source, therefore making softer light. Compare the size of the ring flash(9" - 10" across) ...


1

Ring flash gives a very distinctive look. It virtually eliminates shadows on the face of the subject (ring flash shots are usually taken head-on) while leaving a soft, even shadow around the subject.


1

I've assumed that you're probably only talking about triggering as it's unlikely that there is anything out there that can do a CLS to generic TTL. You have several options depending on what other equipment you're shooting with. Use a PC Sync cord to hotshoe adapter from a PC Sync socket on your camera or flash that is being triggered by CLS. Use a cable ...


1

No, but both Metz and Sigma offer flashes which are compatible with the Nikon wireless flash system. They work differently — Sigma's acts as a controller, while Metz's works as one of the slaves, controlled by the on-camera flash. I don't think you're going to have any options with the flash you have. While there are now some radio triggers (from ...



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