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by clabacchio

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15

Simple: the color of the sky is comprised of the mix of all three channels. If it were gray, there would be equal amounts of red, green, and blue. It's not, though — there's a lot more blue, a little less green, and very little red. Pretty much like this: Check out how the arrows on the slider are pretty much exactly at the same percentages as the spikes ...


15

I'm not quite sure what you're asking, but I'll try and cover all the bases. Firstly RGB values run from 0 to some arbitrary number depending on the colour depth - how many different colours your image format or editing program can store. A typical colour depth is 8bit per channel. Here the number of red, green and blue values is two to the power of 8, ...


6

Yes and no. It is important to remember that RGB is an additive process, and CYMK is a subtractive process. First, the yes; there are general mappings that can be done -- so the absence of green light means that you want to print magenta (which will reflect the red and blue portions). On a slightly more detailed level, you get the "no"; There is more than ...


4

First of all, sRGB is a single color space, with defined boundaries and defined mappings from RGB values to (for example) CIE XYZ values, a specified viewing environment, etc. CYMK, by contrast, is really a whole family of color spaces. All the color spaces in the family are subtractive, but you can't count on them having a lot in common beyond that. The ...


4

You can get white LED lights that like monitors do actually create white from combinations of very narrow bands of R, G and B light - we perceive it as white of a certain "Kelvin" balance, but if you use a spectrometer, you will see spikes. http://www.ecse.rpi.edu/~schubert/Light-Emitting-Diodes-dot-org/chap20/chap20.htm The same goes for fluorescent ...


4

No. "White" light contains all wavelengths of light - the Kelvin temperature just affects the proportions of each wavelength. Three lasers will have just three specific wavelengths so can't possibly reproduce the full spectrum of light that is in white light.


4

Short answer: If you don't mind which colors the CMYK channel values represent, simply apply any random CMYK profile you can find and call it a day. Long answer: there is no really color space called "CMYK" with the meaning that ANY value combination for channels C, M, Y and K results in any specific color. Sure, a high value for Y and zero for the other ...


4

I decomposed your image into its component colors in the GIMP with Color | Components | Decompose, to Color model: RGB and with 'Decompose to layers' checked. When I look at the individual layers, this is what I see: I guess that the bulk of each "color" is going into painting the background; the red layer is making the background all-black, which is ...


4

I haven't done the math, but I believe there is a lossless RGB to CMYK transform, just as there is from RGB to Lab or RGB to HSL and back. I believe you just want to ignore the black channel, and reflect the R, G, and B channels across the color cube. The thing is, in what way would that be useful? No one makes CMYK images with the intent of showing them on ...


3

Good explanations of additive versus subtractive color so far, I just wanted to clarify a few points... First, there isn't a single RGB or CMYK standard, both are device dependent (the colors vary based on what device is displaying/printing them), so already we have trouble. A typical CMYK color space (a graph of all the possible colors of a given color ...


2

When talking "CMYK", your talking a completely different language than RGB, the range of gamuts there tends to be rather diverse and device dependent. I would say its less about "lossless" conversion, and more about properly converting an RGB image to the right mix of CMYK inks for each pixel. There WILL be loss, but when a final print is viewed, the ...



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