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by Jon

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16

The DoF Preview button is on the front of your camera, just below the lens release button.


11

You may want a coupling ring ($7). This lets you mount one lens, in reverse, to another lens. This gives you insane macro capabilities, and very little depth of field. You will find that focusing takes an extremely long time, and you need to set your aperture on your reversed lens first, mounted normally, before flipping it. Not-too-good-example


10

You will need a Reverse Mount Adapter, here's an example. You mount the adapter to the body, then mount the lens and finally you attach the second part of the adapter to the back of your lens.


9

I'm not quite sure why you're so skeptical; it's well-explained and the explanation seems plausible. To respond to your particular points, having read the page: The setup with the stool and glass is used for the photos where the snowflakes are on the glass and backlit. They are on the glass, 2.5-3cm away from the lens. The rings on the front of the lens ...


7

Yes, it can; pretty much any lens can, given a wide enough focal length. A 50mm lens will give you a 1:1 reproduction ratio (the magic 'macro' ratio), which means the image on the sensor will be life size. The wider the lens, the bigger the ratio, so a 35mm lens will give you a good macro shot (at least in terms of magnification). An 18-55mm kit lens will ...


7

Hallo I have found reverse lens protectors for Canon and Nikon on a german website. The best thing about these are you only have to buy one, and you can use it on all your lenses. you can buy them here: Traumflieger reverse lens protective filter (Canon) Traumflieger reverse lens protective filter (Nikon) The protection ring is attached to the rear of ...


6

I've faced similar problems and also was able to overcome a few of them. A few techniques that has proved to be efficient for me are: Focus changes even if you move a millimeter. I tried so hard to keep my body as stiff as possible but that did NOT work. So, I just let it go. I start by looking at the blur image through the viewfinder, slowly move forward ...


6

We have a great blog post here at our own photography stack exchange blog that explains the process very thoroughly: Take macro shots like this for less than the cost of a pizza To answer your question, yes you can still manual focus, that is the only option as autofocus will not work when reverse mounted. Manual focus is a bit odd feeling, because the ...


6

If the image in the viewfinder was dark, I would say you are probably not opening the aperture. However, as you mention it is cloudy grey, I think it is more likely that you are simply not getting close enough to your subject. You need to get within a couple of centimetres of your subject to form an image when using a reversed lens. As Unapiedra said in the ...


5

The aperture can't be set by the camera - it doesn't think anything is connected to the camera. So that's why you're getting F00 I believe. As far as the focus goes, you definitely lose infinity focus and you'll need to be EXTREMELY close to your subject. Try putting the lens within a few inches of your subject and it should start to come into focus.


5

From a mechanical viewpoint, you can reverse a zoom just as well as a prime -- you're using the lens' filter ring, so the type of lens makes little difference. From an optical viewpoint, at least when I've tried it the results didn't impress me much. In fairness, however, reversing lenses tends to be a bit hit or miss, so I might have just had rather bad ...


5

You will not normally be using AF in a macro setting anyway, so that is a moot point. The critical bit with EF objectives is that the aperture is electronically controlled, so unless your adapter supplies power and the electronic stop-down command from the camera you will be shooting wide open always which is not a good thing. Dare I suggest using a lens ...


5

You attach both lenses by their filter threads. So you need to find a reverse rings where one filter thread is for tele and another is for prime lens filter thread (so in your case 62 -> 52mm). Just be careful not to buy one with bayonet on one side and filter thread on another, as that's quite different type on mounting than what you need. And be careful ...


4

On the front of the camera, bottom right of the lens mount (as you look at the front), small round button.


4

You base a reversing ring on the filter thread size and mount for your camera. To determine your size, check this question. That particular lens has a 58mm filter size, so you need something like this that uses the Nikon mount. I'm assuming you mean the 50mm f/1.8 G and not the D, since your D3100 won't autofocus with the D but will with the G. If you ...


4

To firmly assemble the two lenses, i used two P series Cokin adaptor rings, so i can put a rubber band around those two rings, and the lenses are assembled temporarly and without a reversing ring :)


4

If you own both of the two lenses you mentioned, just keep one on the camera, then hold the other (reversed) in front of it (you can tape the two lenses together if you want). Doing this you'll get extreme magnification; on the other hand, depth of field will be close to none. You'll probably want to avoid getting most of the image black so keep the ...


4

The magnification will indeed depend on your reversing hardware. The more distance you put between the lens and the body, the higher the magnification. The exact formula is: magnification = lens_to_sensor_distance / focal_length - 1 The problem is that the distance from the lens to the sensor has to be measured from the relevant principal plane of the ...


4

I'm afraid you cannot determine that magnification ratio mathematically. Peter Forsell's great Math for macro photographers page contains lots of macro magnification ratio calculations for different scenarios, but in the section about the reversed lens, he claims the following: We cannot directly calculate the zero extension magnification (Zm) of the ...


4

Extension tube (ET) versus reverse adaptor (RA): A RA is cheaper, but you will probably have a "fixed focus" and therefore, fixed reproduction ratio -- at least on your 50mm. On some zoom lenses, the zoom ring can change the focus distance when reversed, but image quality may be poor. Reversed lenses often exhibit a notable lack of flatness of field. This ...


4

The answer to your first question is answered here. Both are good low-cost ways to get started in macro photography. Autofocus is not very effective as you near 1:1 magnification. Most AF systems will struggle to find focus, you have such a narrow DOF anyway that holding focus is very hard. With anything that is not moving, you are far better to set up a ...


4

Well, the most extreme macro lens in production is, as far as I know, the Canon MP-E 65mm. It offers up to 5x magnification and is not an easy beast to master. At 5x magnification, it would still have to be a pretty darn big fly if its face were to fill a 24x36mm full-frame sensor, or even the 16x24-ish one on a crop camera. In other words - kit that ...


4

It's a fact that using two lenses with one reversed works. Here are a few quick examples that I shot by combining two lenses: 50mm with 50mm reversed: 50mm with 28mm reversed: 105mm with 28mm reversed: These were quick, dirty, and hand held -- I held the camera with one hand and held the reversed lens against the camera lens, focusing simply by moving ...


3

Actually instead of holding the apeture lever or using an aftermarket adapter you can use your DOF preview button or live view when the lens is connected properly. Then without shutting the camera off, pop the lens off and your apeture should stay where you had it set while it was connected properly. Much easier and I have used this trick with a d3100, ...


3

You need a reversing ring with a 52mm thread on one side and a standard Nikon lens mount on the other. You screw the reversing ring thread onto the filter thread at the end of the lens, then attach the lens-mount side to the camera body. You would do this with your 18-55mm lens because: A) I believe the 18-200 has a 72mm filter size and B) A wider angle ...


3

@ElendilTheTall has written an excellent article which describes all-you-need-to-know about reverse macro, you should read through his article: http://photo.blogoverflow.com/2011/07/take-macro-shots-like-this-for-less-than-the-cost-of-a-pizza/


3

At close focus distances depth of field is very very shallow and requires a small aperture (and lots of light or a long exposure). As stated in the comments thread of ElendilTheTall's answer there's no aperture lever on Canon lenses and as the electrical contacts are broken by mounting the lens backward the only way to stop down is to use the depth of field ...


2

You lose aperture control when you reverse the lens because the aperture mechanics are no longer connected to the camera - they're at the other end now! If your lens doesn't have a manual aperture ring (most modern ones don't), you can either hold the aperture lever in place to keep it open, or get a marble-sized ball of poster tack and use that to keep the ...


2

Reverse mount are intended for the filter thread of a lens. With that in mind, it is clear that you can mount a zoom lens as well as a prime, reversed on the mount (as long as it has the matching filter diameter, of course). Note that there are rings that let you mount a lens onto the body mount (say EF mount for Canon), and rings that will let you mount a ...



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