Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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0

4k is for video, that is quite low for photography nowdays. Video is good at 4k. When taking 4K pictures, use a tripod. Also, beware of the truth of camera specifications. If it is a cheap camera, you have to determine if the manufacturer is using interpolation or exaggerating the specifications.


-1

First, it depends on what make and model of camera you are using, as '4K photo' modes may work in different ways. But usually the main reason for using 4K photos is speed. As it essentially recording a video, it is like using a high speed burst mode, at up to 30 frames per second. For many cameras, it is essentially recording a 4K video, then extracting ...


2

Simply put, sensor resolution is a sales gimmic. A tiny little sensor with lots of sites crammed really close together cause noise and bad low light abilities. They start absorbing charge from each other and making artifacts that have to be filtered by software. The bigger the sensor, the bigger the sites, the more sensitive they are and the cleaner the ...


0

Others might poke fun of 127 kilobytes but I would like to give you the benefit of the doubt. IF you are using a scalable vector file such as .svg, .svgz, .ai, .eps, and others then the kilobytes have no correlation to the finished product as long as the printing software or printing company knows how to work with scalable image formats. If you have a run-...


2

See this answer on the graphic design SE. 10 DPI is apparently a normal resolution for something that size. These days they're printed on giant roll-fed inkjet printers, directly onto vinyl. My recollection of a colleague who did this for a living is that more like 10-100M for the image size would be normal (probably TIFF format so lossless compression to ...


7

Would an image of 127 kilobytes be good enough for an advertisement that size? You really need to know the dimensions of the target billboard in pixels. It's possible that you've got a highly compressed file that will expand to the right size, but it's also possible that your file will be too small to display nicely. It's also not clear if you mean a ...


5

First-off lets assume you are talking an IMAGE, not a vector file. So lets say jpg. If you work on 50DPI print, you would need an image of aprox 13,780 x 7100px. which is nearly 98 mega-pixels. OK so I know what you are thinking - it doesn't NEED to have the full print resolution to be a good billboard print. So lets say we will settle for a printed ...


1

If and only if your advertisement's pixel size is ~2.4cm/pixel (or about 1 in. per pixel, or 1 PPI). The area of your 7×3.6m billboard is 25.2m². Assuming a 127 KiB file contains only 3 byte-per pixel data (uncompressed, no metadata, image format headers, etc.), that means you are presenting only 42.3×1024 actual pixels. Dividing, that gives you 5.8×10⁻⁴ m²/...


0

Beyond scanning at the scanner's highest native resolution, you can combine multiple scans made at 90º and 180º orientations to the original. Although the problems are slightly different, the same solution will work here as well: How to restore as much detail as possible to a scanned image of an inkjet-printed page? What is the best way to remove texture ...


2

Normally, the idea is that to print double size, you scan at 600 dpi and print at 300 dpi (for 2x). Or to print triple size, you scan at 900 dpi, and print at 300 dpi (for 3x). Anyway, that is the idea for printing enlarged copies. However, prints really don't enlarge very well. One, prints are already enlarged, and two, print paper is simply only designed ...


1

There are photo service bureaus that will scan your film for you, and there are many scanners available that can support scanning transparencies or film. For example the Epson Perfection V600 http://amzn.to/2avk6wY . You'd need to make sure it can mount your film size. It is best to scan at the native resolution of the scanner. Many times scanners have ...


17

Whoever told you about 4K probably mislead you. At least, you have the resolution right. You see, 4K at 3840x2160 is a resolution term used for video, signifying almost 4000 pixels in width. The aspect ratio there is 16:9 which is the same as HD video. Cameras usually shoot 4:3 or 3:2 images, although there are other ratios too. A pixel is a pixel. There is ...


98

4K might be the next big thing in video, but for still photography that's just 8 megapixels, which is quite low for most cameras, and I think around the resolution of the iPhone. I have a Nikon D5300 with 24MP resolution, and I've seen other DSLRs get up to 36MP or higher. And no matter what, if you zoom in enough, you will eventually get pixelation (...


47

Most cameras already have a resolution going far beyond 4K. Assuming you mean Ultra HD (3840x2160) opposed to "true" DCI 4K (4096x2160) you get a resolution of about 8MP (DCI 4K would be about 8.8MP). Most cameras are already way over this size and are at 20MP or even higher. So a "4K" image would actually be smaller than a full size image. That aside, you ...



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