Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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1

You won't be able to get the best results from just theoretically analyzing one or more effects that cause blurring. The best way to proceed is by measuring the blurring and then do deconvolution based on the measured point spread function. You can print a some black and white pattern costing of lines in different directions, or circles on a piece of paper. ...


2

Yes, the anti-aliasing filter on most digital cameras is an optical filter that blurs the light just in front of the image sensor. But for your purposes that is the least of your worries. The way a Bayer filter mask works on the overwhelming majority of digital cameras means that the actual resolution limit of cameras so equipped is about 1/2 the number of ...


0

As everyone has noted, the file tyoe is not sufficient information. Find out resolution color space And the more varied details that could be a TIFF, e.g. if it's made for printing press then it could be CMYK set up for whst publishers want; color model (rgb? Cmyk?) bits per sample Also, if the jpeg is "just" the same file exported, it can still ...


3

Short answer: you have to use a microscope, a drum scanner or some specific scanners for film. Flatbed scanners barely reach 1500 dpi (real, effective, measured on the details you get, not on the number of pixels you get), see http://www.filmscanner.info/EpsonPerfectionV600Photo.html and the other ones. This is a measurement of actual details in some 120 ...


1

Or you can use a macro lens to scan your film. I've found this to give better results than anything short of a very high-end scanner. Use a digital camera, a macro lens and a lightbox of some sort mounted in a copy stand. For even better results, make multiple images of parts of the negative and stitch them.


2

It depends on the film: your estimate would be valid for old Panatomic-X using Beutler processing (I calculated ~116 Megapixels (MP) for a 6 cm x 6cm image, 180 lines/mm). Adox, though, claims about 500 MP for its CMS II High Resolution Film. So, yes, if you want to take advantage of the full resolution, scanning at ~9,600 DPI (~400 DPMM) would produce ...


2

I will start by a parallel with printing photos. Having a resolution of 300 ppi (pixels per inch) is relatively standard. It means that 300 pixels of a digital picture will be printed on one inch. It is common to assume that details are conserved with this resolution. So if the original painting is about 30*21 inch (like the Mona Lisa), you will need the ...


0

JPEG is a "lossy" compressed format, and it depends if the image is very homogeneous or not, very homogeneous images have a large compression factor meanwhile non-homogeneous images have a small compression factor. On the other hand TIFF is almost always used as a lossless format.


1

From the info you are providing there is no way to know. Some hints There is no way of knowing the resolution from the file size. Presumably both files have the same resolution (width x height), they are just delivered in different file formats. A high quality JPEG file has a very low information loss, (less than 0.4% compared to the uncompressed 24 bit ...


4

I have written a more elaborate post in Spanish here, which Google translate can probably help you read. A simplified version. There is a unit for offset commercial printing called lpi. This is defined by the real resolution of a laser printing on a negative film or plate. Let us say the laser plate printer gives you 2400 dpi. If you need 256 tones of ...


2

The variability of size and positioning precision of one "spit", as it's called, varies with printing technology and model lines over time. As I recall, one particular printer I studied (and some generic lore mixed in) you have a certain volume of ink (a few picoliters) ejected with one action from the nozzle. Several such quantum spits can be performed ...


0

This is impossible. The most basic way to 'zoom' in on a picture is to display it on a huge screen, like a TV. That will already zoom the picture several times larger, and you cannot stop that.



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