Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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1

I would say you want a telephoto lens. If you want a scan-like image, being far away with a long lens is your best bet, as it will preserve the rectilinearity of your subject. I don't know exactly how long a lens you'd need to get no noticeable distortion, but if it were me I would use my 100mm prime.


0

Advantage in creating squance photos for Time-lapses. I use mRAW (sRAW) quite a bit with Lightroom to enhance the sequence of images for creating Time-lapse videos afterwards. As they are mostly produced in 1080p or 2k7 I dont need the full size RAW but still want the dynamic range of RAW to work with. I cant think of any other not mentioned reason to use ...


1

How is the image impacted here? Two sensors with different sizes having same pixel resolution are capable of giving roughly same images (not discussing noise, dynamic range and colour reproduction now). However, this is only possible in theory. If an objective is used to photograph a black to white transition (say the brightness ratio be 1:1000, rough ...


1

how the resolution of images shot with particular mega pixel sensor is being maintained? Like a 20 megapixel full frame or APS-C have the same resolution of output image, although sensor size differs. Different sensors have different sized pixels. If you have an APS-C sensor and a full frame sensor that have the same pixel count, say 20 megapixels or ...


2

Ah, well you answered yourself, but changed your requirements. "No loss of quality" and "no loss of quality to the naked eye" are vastly different with images. Also, PNGcrush and opt-jpg work completely differently; only noting this because you mentioned PNGcrush in your OP. PNGcrush only optimizes metadata about the image, not the image itself. This is ...


0

Canvas prints are often easiest to print when compared with prints to be made on high art or glossy photographic paper. The reason is that the texture of the canvas removes some of the need to show super sharp detail. The detail becomes subsumed into the material texture of the canvas to an extent. The weave coarseness can help the photographer where ...


0

Avoiding calculations can be done with image editing software. If you take software such as Photoshop Elements and select the cropping tool, you will see some number entry boxes along the menu bar at the top of the image frame. Enter the dimensions you want in the width and height boxes and 300 in the pixels per inch box. Crop the image using the crop tool, ...


3

There are three basic principles here: You want at least 200 pixels per inch in your print. For most subjects, most people will start to see pixelated blockiness if you have less than that. 300 pixels per inch would be better, and that's especially true for a small print like this, because people are more likely to examine it very closely. For large prints ...


4

It's easy: you take the desired DPI (dots per inch) and multiply it with the frame size. Say, your photolab (or printer) prints with 300 dpi. Then your picture must be at least 2.5*300 x 3.5*300 = 750x1050 pixels. However I doubt that you have such a low resolution in your Nikon :) I recommend to take photos with maximal available resolution. So you will ...


3

You may easily check it if you photgraph an objective test chart - which will have converging lines for judging the resolution. If 2px or so wide lines look very pale on the photograph when using 100% zoom then you may be sure that the objective does not catch with resolution of sensor. Hint: it does not. Even huge number of expensive objectives for 1,5x ...


2

However, these two sometimes give completely different results. For example, the Lumix LF1 has a perceptual megapixel count of 3MP, while the Sony RX1 boasts 18MP -- a 6x difference. But when we compare the number of lines the camera can resolve on a resolution chart, a completely different picture emerges: The Lumix does 22, while the RX1 does only ...


3

I'll just add, the two numbers measures different aspects. Dxomark's "perceptual megapixel" are measuring both resolution and contrast, hence the use of the word "perceptual". It's not the actually detail sharpness but how we as humans sees it on print in the size they uses for the measurements. Dxomark is basically telling you how most of us perceives the ...



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