Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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2

We already have quite a few answers on this topic, so you should do some reading at least here: Is there a general formula for image size vs. print size? What is a suitable image resolution for canvas prints? The short of it is that you should not resize anything on your side. Let the printer do that for you. Send them the largest image you have before ...


1

I think the aproach of a photographer and a designer is in this case the opposite. (I am both) A Photographer needs a print of some size, for example an 8x10 print, and you can just send your photo on the Megapixels the photo has. The PPI are defined by the size of your print. It can be xxx, yyy or any number depending on the print size. The photo is ...


3

Nope. The number is purely fictitious. The vast majority of cameras always put the same number. You can even check it out by changing the size of image output and you will see that the DPI stays exactly the same. So, if your 24 MP camera outputs a 24 MP image at 6000x4000 which specifies 300 DPI, it should correspond to a 20" x 13.3" but if you set it to 12 ...


1

The manufacturer's use of 300 PPI is not based on any calculation, it is purely arbitrary and selected purely based on historical convention that hi-res printers were 300PPI. Not all devices even record resolution (PPI) values, the raw files for my Nikon D70, D90 and D600 cameras don't report resolution in Adobe Bridge at all. .jpg files based on those raw ...


0

If a camera has a resolution of 2400 x 3000 pixels then it simply has that many pixels, regardless of the PPI. It's not until you print that the PPI comes into play. At 300 PPI you'd get 8" x 10" (2400/300 and 3000/300). At 200 PPI you'd get 12" x 15". So for a fixed resolution, if a camera reports 300 PPI, then yes that equates to a specific print ...


2

I have several answers. 1) Use whatever lens you want (or can). You are limited not by a lens, but on the actual space you have in front of your board. If you have the board on a tight space, you will probably need a wide angle lens, but if the board is on the middle of a manufacturing plant, you can use a telephoto lens to minimize spherical distortion. ...


1

A macro lens will be the best option, because macro lenses have very good corner to corner sharpness and very little distortion. Any macro lens will do, however choose one with at working distance best suite to your use, my guess will be around 60mm or so.


2

I would say you want a telephoto lens. If you want a scan-like image, being far away with a long lens is your best bet, as it will preserve the rectilinearity of your subject. I don't know exactly how long a lens you'd need to get no noticeable distortion, but if it were me I would use my 100mm prime. Edit: another option would be to shoot with a wide angle ...


0

Advantage in creating squance photos for Time-lapses. I use mRAW (sRAW) quite a bit with Lightroom to enhance the sequence of images for creating Time-lapse videos afterwards. As they are mostly produced in 1080p or 2k7 I dont need the full size RAW but still want the dynamic range of RAW to work with. I cant think of any other not mentioned reason to use ...



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