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27

It sounds like you're doing almost everything right, but there's one detail that caught my attention: Aperture highest the lens offers. I'm assuming that this means that you are stopping the lens all the way down. You shouldn't do that, because the small aperture results in a less sharp image overall due to diffraction. See What is a "diffraction ...


26

There is a good book which indeed does talk about photographing a canvas. It is the first book I would recommend someone who wants to learn about lighting. It is called Light: Science and Magic. (At this point: Anyone wants to have the previous edition of it? I think I'll get the new one. ;) ) The thing about the canvas is (I guess you have noticed so far ...


14

This particular logo is easy, because: It's only three colors It's relatively simple vector art there's a simple outline around the shapes The goal is reconstruction, not preservation of a masterpiece That means you don't need to light it very well and you don't need to worry too much about noise. Take a photograph straight down, and notice any sources ...


9

I agree with the comments about aperture, but also don't forget about mirror lockup and using a remote release (or the timer function) for the exposure.


6

You camera isn't holding you back. I would think that slide film would be even harder for you to use since the time it takes to get feedback on your results will be measured, mostly likely, in days, not seconds. I've photographed my gallery owner's (Katherine Baltivik) works for her to have printed so quality was of utmost importance. Here's what one looked ...


6

Benjamin, I want to encourage you to consider something different than pursuing only sharpness. That is continue with the different techniques already discussed, focus stacking, super resolution, etc. However, add to your tool belt two sets of other tools. I say this because of your statement "I'm getting great shots.. but I want to capture all the fine ...


4

Use the delayed shutter release (or a remote) will reduce any shake from touching the camera (which can still affect a camera on a tripod) and the mirror lockup which moves the mirror out of the way early again reducing any vibrations caused by the internal mirror moving during the shot. This may help along with the other advice about finding the sweet spot ...


3

From my experience, accurate colour reproduction comes from getting it right in camera first. This is how I would approach the scenario: Set the camera up properly - Use a lense that minimises vignetting and other unwanted distortions. Make sure it's of a focal length that means you're not of a distance that is uncomfortably close to the canvas. Shooting ...


3

While @Paul Cezanne has pretty much covered what you need to do, I'll add a few notes: Photographing the paintings outdoors has its own challenges: Movement due to breeze, and harsh shadows of brush-strokes, which will show up under close examination and create a false pattern. If you must, you can partly address both these concerns by fashioning a "soft ...


3

Given your update, I would offer that color with digital photography is as much a problem of mathematics as it is getting proper illumination and white balance when actually making the photograph. Your camera senses light, separates that light into discrete collections filtered into certain ranges of wavelength (reds, greens, and blues). Depending on the ...


3

Well, first off, unless your willing to get the new Nikon D800 (which has a 36.3mp sensor...and is supposed to list around $3000), its unlikely you'll find a cheap camera that is fully capable of reproducing at 300dpi (I assume you mean in final print here...its tough to correlate scanner DPI to digital photo resolution), let alone at the quality you could ...


2

About the digital processing part, you should avoid using the general purpose sharpening methods like unsharp mask, as these methods will only increase the local contrast — making details more visible but you won't get details back that have become invisible. It is better to use methods that are based on actually reversing the blurring due to imperfect ...


2

You could also consider trying using a wide aperture, (resulting in a narrow depth of field), and then focus stacking or several different exposures and exposure stacking possibly both - some software options can be found here. While focus stacking is normally used for macro photography it is not restricted to such use and can be very rewarding and should ...


2

I would use the 50mm, stop down the aperture to f/4 or 5.6, aim for iso 200 and under a second exposure. I would also underexpose by a stop or two. I would tweak the contrast and sharpness in post, but you could try doing a custom picture style by adjusting the picture style contrast and sharpness settings. If you have a flash maybe consider adding some side ...


2

A flexible tripod with a level from a good brand A platform with two/three steps for shooting the artwork from an appropriate level (you may need, sometime) Consult the curator whether they will allow you to use a flash or not. Because in some art studios, it's strictly forbidden to use flash during taking a photo. If they allow using flash, get a ETTL ...


2

I shoot artwork regularly with my Nikon D300, i use a Nikon 50mm 1.4f on arounf 10f, 2x studio flashes, a tripod, and a colour chart. mount the artwork directly in front of the camera, 90 degrees in all directions. always shoot raw, and use a circular polarising filter. IF the artwork is oil, you may need to experiment with flash/ light positioning to ...


2

Here's the problem with photographing paintings: Cameras are RGB devices that don't see the way humans see. So there is going to be problems matching colors in a painting, because a camera that's profiled using a target like a color checker, is most accurate on those pigments and colors...in the color checker. There is a scientific phenomenon called the ...


2

To get a good photo to work with you would want: A long focal length (i.e. taken as far up as possible, not a wide angle closeup). As close as possible from right above. As even lighting as possible. Normally a good light source (i.e. not fluorescent light) is needed to get a full range of colour, but in this case it's not so important as the logo only ...


1

Actually all you have to do is a perspective correction, your current photo is just fine to reproduce the logo, you just need a wider crop. just use any tool you have, such as Photoshop or GIMP to make the image look flat, then you can create your logo by tracing over that.


1

You basically have two options: (hint: I think option 2 is far superior, but not nearly as fun) Option 1 - technically difficult, time consuming and requires equipment and some expertise The camera must be parallel to the floor, above the center of the logo, you will need a fancy tripod that can hold the camera steady pointing strait down without it seeing ...


1

Your camera is fine. Slide film will do fine as it kick out more dynamics for you. Use a low ISO (50-100). If you don't have good lighting go to a ISO 200. Higher ISO than that will start to give you noticeable grains. The biggest "enemy" so-to-speak photographing oil/acrylic paintings, is reflection. I recommend you therefor to use a polarize filter on ...


1

Since this is a homework question I prefer not to give a direct answer (especially as there is a near duplicate), but as I read it, the task set is "what is the best way that you can think of to do this". It is not "what is the bare minimum/cheapest way to do this" On that basis, these are some questions you may want to ask yourself about the answer ...


1

If you can use flash, get polarizing film for your flashes. Use a polarizer on your camera lens. This combination will allow you to evenly light the artwork and then "dial out" the reflections off the artwork.



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