Serene Life

by garik

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Camera grip replacement material: Adhesive-backed neoprene. I put it right over the old sticky grip on my Olympus E10. Very easy to work with, enough for 4 grips or more per package. I found this product under archery supplies of all places. Working great for me, and it's cheap! Gander Mountain Order Toll Free: 1-888-542-6337 Silence-ilator Pad (3.5” X ...


0

TL;DR: a synthetic rubber based adhesive is what you want From the service manual for Nikon SB-600 speedlight, you need to use Adhesive J67017 - rather cryptic. Googling this finds another Nikon service manual that says this product ID is for Cemedine 575. This is a japanese brand of Chloroprene Rubber adhesive - so any synthetic rubber based adhesive ...


3

I collect old cameras and have used various cheap methods to cover up scuffs and fill in small dings. These have ranged from Simple Markers as suggested by yourself to using car touch up paint. Several coats of that stuff often fills in very well and gives a good finish. Another way that I have used, and quite possibly the best results, was Epoxy Based ...


1

I know exactly how to fix this. I have used in the past a type of glue called "Mitre Mate" it is made by no-nonsense I think but I'm sure other similar products are available. It sticks anything to anything and comes with a glue and an activator spray. I've used it in the past for all sorts and the latest was gluing copper pipes to each other. That will ...


7

I would throw it away and buy a replacement. Even if I could fix it, I don't think I'd trust it to hold my camera. If it breaks again with the camera on it, the camera may only fall a few inches or a foot; after all, it's a mini-tripod. But, what if it breaks and the camera falls those few inches, then falls several feet off of the object you had the tripod ...


2

I see two ways to fix this. Option 1. A) It looks like part of the female threads (black plastic) are still on the metal male threads. First thing you'll need to do is GENTLY remove this broken piece. You may be able to twist it off with your fingers, depending on how tight it is. Otherwise, take a pair of pliers and twist it off. B) Rotate the ...


1

Consider getting a quote from Steven Lee, Camera Hospital, Beencoolen street, Singapore - Camera hospital website here I have personally sent cameras and lenses from NZ for Steven to repair, so this option is possibly a viable one for you. He's good, honest, friendly (although sometimes little spoken) and about as cheap as you'll get. Slow freight both ...


3

Unless you can do it yourself there are no cheap lens repairs. It takes the same amount of time and expertise to disassemble, repair, and reassemble a cheap lens as it does to do so with an expensive one. With regards to repairing an existing lens, the only difference is the quality of the glass and other parts that the lens is made of. If replacement parts ...


2

An important detail that hasn't been mentioned thus far is how file deletion is (usually) done on SSDs. It is different than the traditional, spinning-disk, hard disk drives (HDDs). As mentioned in AJ's answer, traditionally when you "delete" a file the operating system (Windows 8 in this case) simply tells the hard drive that the file is no longer needed ...


0

If you recovered to the same drive that you originally deleted them on, you probably corrupted them yourself. The reason you can undelete a file is that the drive is simply marked as the space being available, no other data is actually changed. Thus, if you read where the file had been, the data is still there. The problem with recovery is that when you ...



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