Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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17

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


11

I've had two lenses repaired. 10-22 which was obliterated by a skier on a half-pipe (it ended up looking very much like your lens) and a 50 f/1.4 which I dropped onto concrete. Both of which came back optically as good as before they were damaged, as far as I can detect. The 10-22 does however have a ski mark down the side which will probably reduce the ...


11

While I doubt that Canon has a sweeping 'no lemon' policy beyond what is offered in their basic warranty language, I will say this: photographers who are Canon Professional Services members are offered services well above and beyond those that are offered within the basic warranty language. As someone who over the years has had equipment lens malfunctions ...


11

The 99% likely best answer is, of course, to send it to a competent camera repairer. Odds are 'It's broken'. However, just in case, and very very unlikely, try the following. These have almost no chance of being successful, but in a few cases may work: Remove & replace lens. Is mirror stuck up? If so, DO NOT TRY to move it. Take to repairer. If ...


10

There really isn't all that much you can do with lenses yourself without making things worse. It sounds like something mechanically is wrong, and the only way to fix that is going to be to open up the lens. I would take it to a Nikon authorized repair shop. If you are in the US, this form will take you to the list of authorized repair shops.


10

Unless you're a camera technician, it's broken beyond self-repair. Don't mess around with flashes if you're not skilled with high-voltage electronics and camera internals. Flashes need to store charges of 300V or so in order to work, and may not discharge all the way when you turn the camera off. If you open up your camera and touch the wrong thing, you'll ...


9

Probably not - even if the repair were to cost less than the value of the lens it sounds like you're getting on fine without the lens, and are probably ready to move on to a better lens. The only reason you might repair it is to sell, but without a free estimate you're taking a risk that you will lose money through this. My advice would be to write it off ...


9

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around ...


8

You can test the polarizing effect by placing a non-circular polarizing filter in front, you should be able to place it at an angle that almost eliminates light transmission. However I highly doubt that the scratches will have an effect on it's ability to filter polarized light! As already stated scratches on the front of a lens typically have a minimal ...


8

The end of the lens is extremely out of focus, it takes a lot of damage to be immediately visible. One test I've heard of is to attach a few strips of post-it paper to the front of the lens - you'll barely be able to see the difference. The most likely effect will be a slight blurring of the image. Take a couple of pictures of a static scene using a tripod, ...


7

F-mount lenses are locked in place by a small metal pin that pulls flush with the lens mount when you press the lens release button. This pin would be in the three-o'clock position when you're looking where the lens mount would be. On auto-focus bodies like your D90, there's a second pin for the focus motor that does the same, and it's at the seven-o'clock ...


7

Just as a biological virus can't infect hosts that are very different from one another, a computer virus typically only infects a certain type of host (PC, Mac, Linux, etc.). It's very unlikely that the virus has actually infected your DSLR. What you're probably seeing, though, is that the SD card is a carrier. You mentioned that you connected the DSLR to ...


7

It is likely that your computer is infected with a worm that automatically copies itself to removable media to try and spread. When you format the card, it may be briefly clean, but it would rapidly get reinfected by the worm. It is possible the worm only uploads itself to the card when inserted in the computer. Try formatting the card, if virus scan then ...


6

Sounds like something has entered the lens and jammed the mechanics somehow. It sounds like it's in need of professional attention, but you might get away by gently tapping the lens onto a clean surface. If you can afford to write the lens off, there's always the possibility of dissecting the lens and making some interesting shots of the lens internals that ...


6

First, check the AF/M switch on the D5100 camera body. This is at the left-hand side of the camera (from the photographer's point of view) near the bottom, below the lens release button. Make sure it's set to "AF". Similarly check the "M/A - M" focus mode switch on the lens. Make sure it's set to set to "M/A". Beyond that, see if you can narrow the ...


6

There are repair shops that will give you an estimate of repair cost, or even better a no obligation quote. Then it's a simple case of comparing the repair cost with the used value of the equipment (trawling ebay is a good avenue for this), giving a slight bias toward repair to make up for the risk of buying used.


6

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


5

Given the age of the OM-1, it's a fair guess that the only way to get a replacement mirror would be to buy a junk OM-1 with a good mirror, and remove the mirror from one body and transplant it into the other. As you've already found, the mirror is quite fragile, so doing this would be fairly difficult. Second, it's easy to find film cameras in good ...


5

Canon's warranty terms state that a defective lens: will be repaired with new or comparable rebuilt parts or exchanged for a refurbished Product, as determined by Canon or the authorized service provider n their sole discretion. I find nothing to indicate that Canon specifically has any sort of "no lemon" policy. Terms found by browsing ...


5

There is a way to find out if the focal lengths were accessible earlier. Given that you haven't had any other lenses in the same focal length range, you could use a tool like ExposurePlot to run over your older photos and see if you have ever used any focal lengths in the now inaccessible area. The results are shown in 35mm equivalent, so look for usage of ...


5

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


5

If the lens is under warranty, by all means check to see if it's covered. Assuming it's not, though, your first step needs to be assessing the value of your lens. Go to ebay and see what these lenses are selling for used -- that's what you'd expect to be able to sell yours for if it's working. If you're going to consider sending the lens to be repaired, ...


5

All brands of camera produce bad copy of a model. Maybe your G11 was a bad copy, maybe there was an accident that you were not aware of that has somehow forced the dust/particle into the lens. Anyway, I won't go so far to say avoid all Canon products. It is like saying "I won't buy anything Apple makes!" when you drop your iPhone for the first time and the ...


5

You can try to take it part which is the only sensible thing to do for this camera. Even if you fix it, some components are broken, so it will never be the same. Repair is out of the question because it will cost more than the camera itself. Once I brought a $119 camera which my daughter broke and they asked for $150 to fix it. I said, that it was more than ...


5

If the lens is stuck to the camera, you most likely have a distorted barrel. Most often this happens if the lens bumped against something while being attached to the camera. This can deform the lens mount and sometimes also some parts inside the lens. This can prevent the zoom/focus ring from turning smoothly. I had that issue with some heavier lenses over ...


5

The 200 f/1.8L is indeed focus-by-wire only. Taking apart the lens is not a problem, but finding replacement parts is - they're no longer available from Canon and the Canon service centres are unlikely to have any in stock. I looked at buying a 200 f/1.8L with a broken AF system, the seller had found someone selling the replacement USM unit but even then I ...


5

If I had to take a guess, they were using a custom focus ring, possibly for use with a follow focus on a DSLR video rig. The ring itself is generally a pretty easily replaceable part, so it isn't too surprising that it still sold at a pretty high price as long as the lens is otherwise in good condition. It's also possible they needed to get to screws ...


5

It looks like either the sensor is broken, or possibly something is wrong in its data connection to the rest of the camera. Either way, there is nothing you can do about this. Since you just bought the camera, you may be able to return it, but that will depend on the seller's policies and perhaps on local law. Otherwise, call Nikon and send the camera in ...



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