Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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20

For all the following: YMMV*, caveat emptor, no responsibility taken for advice given, you decide whether to try this at home. It may even work :-). Be aware that damage may already be fatal and/or that fatal (to the lens) damage may occur along the way. Best attitude is to regard the lens as a writeoff now, with anything you can gain from it by the methods ...


12

Two ways to look at it: This is the perfect excuse to upgrade to a newer and better lens. You really love this lens and that is the one you truly want. Fix it. Generally charges for this should be around $150 which is less costly than a new one.


11

I've had two lenses repaired. 10-22 which was obliterated by a skier on a half-pipe (it ended up looking very much like your lens) and a 50 f/1.4 which I dropped onto concrete. Both of which came back optically as good as before they were damaged, as far as I can detect. The 10-22 does however have a ski mark down the side which will probably reduce the ...


11

While I doubt that Canon has a sweeping 'no lemon' policy beyond what is offered in their basic warranty language, I will say this: photographers who are Canon Professional Services members are offered services well above and beyond those that are offered within the basic warranty language. As someone who over the years has had equipment lens malfunctions ...


11

The 99% likely best answer is, of course, to send it to a competent camera repairer. Odds are 'It's broken'. However, just in case, and very very unlikely, try the following. These have almost no chance of being successful, but in a few cases may work: Remove & replace lens. Is mirror stuck up? If so, DO NOT TRY to move it. Take to repairer. If ...


10

Probably not - even if the repair were to cost less than the value of the lens it sounds like you're getting on fine without the lens, and are probably ready to move on to a better lens. The only reason you might repair it is to sell, but without a free estimate you're taking a risk that you will lose money through this. My advice would be to write it off ...


10

There really isn't all that much you can do with lenses yourself without making things worse. It sounds like something mechanically is wrong, and the only way to fix that is going to be to open up the lens. I would take it to a Nikon authorized repair shop. If you are in the US, this form will take you to the list of authorized repair shops.


10

Unless you're a camera technician, it's broken beyond self-repair. Don't mess around with flashes if you're not skilled with high-voltage electronics and camera internals. Flashes need to store charges of 300V or so in order to work, and may not discharge all the way when you turn the camera off. If you open up your camera and touch the wrong thing, you'll ...


9

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around ...


9

It is likely that your computer is infected with a worm that automatically copies itself to removable media to try and spread. When you format the card, it may be briefly clean, but it would rapidly get reinfected by the worm. It is possible the worm only uploads itself to the card when inserted in the computer. Try formatting the card, if virus scan then ...


9

That's how it's meant to look. Refer the manual from Canon's website, page 23: Refer also p36: the top LCD should be the same.


9

If the scratches don't affect the optical performance of the lens sufficiently to be perceptible in your photos the best course of action you could take is to do nothing. It takes a LOT of damage from scratches or fairly sizeable obstructions before they become noticeable! These photos from Roger Cicala's blog entry at lensrentals.com illustrate just how far ...


8

You can test the polarizing effect by placing a non-circular polarizing filter in front, you should be able to place it at an angle that almost eliminates light transmission. However I highly doubt that the scratches will have an effect on it's ability to filter polarized light! As already stated scratches on the front of a lens typically have a minimal ...


8

The end of the lens is extremely out of focus, it takes a lot of damage to be immediately visible. One test I've heard of is to attach a few strips of post-it paper to the front of the lens - you'll barely be able to see the difference. The most likely effect will be a slight blurring of the image. Take a couple of pictures of a static scene using a tripod, ...


8

I believe these are not user-servicable parts, so I would suggest to locate the nearest Canon service center and have them look at it.


8

The safest way would be to send it to Canon Service Centre or a repair shop and ask for a quote on the repairs. Unless you're ready to write off the lens, or are feeling particularly adventurous, you can take apart the lens as Rowland suggested. If you do, post some pictures :)


8

Sounds like something has entered the lens and jammed the mechanics somehow. It sounds like it's in need of professional attention, but you might get away by gently tapping the lens onto a clean surface. If you can afford to write the lens off, there's always the possibility of dissecting the lens and making some interesting shots of the lens internals that ...


8

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


7

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


7

F-mount lenses are locked in place by a small metal pin that pulls flush with the lens mount when you press the lens release button. This pin would be in the three-o'clock position when you're looking where the lens mount would be. On auto-focus bodies like your D90, there's a second pin for the focus motor that does the same, and it's at the seven-o'clock ...


7

I would throw it away and buy a replacement. Even if I could fix it, I don't think I'd trust it to hold my camera. If it breaks again with the camera on it, the camera may only fall a few inches or a foot; after all, it's a mini-tripod. But, what if it breaks and the camera falls those few inches, then falls several feet off of the object you had the tripod ...


7

There is really no way to remove scratches. You would destroy the optical coatings long before the scratch was gone. Scratches on the front element have almost no effect on image quality, but you may get additional flare under certain lighting conditions. Many people use a black marker to fill in the scratch so it becomes more flare resistant.


6

And the answer is this Canon realized defectiveness of their design, and now offers a $100 option to switch to a better button. This sucks, but hey, what can I do.


6

Just a note. I found this thread while researching the same issue, though the range that wouldn't focus for me was more like from 80ish to 200. After reading the comment by GRM, I investigated my lens and found the front element to actually be loose, having backed out on its threads. As I never take the UV filter off, I never would have found this with ...


6

First, check the AF/M switch on the D5100 camera body. This is at the left-hand side of the camera (from the photographer's point of view) near the bottom, below the lens release button. Make sure it's set to "AF". Similarly check the "M/A - M" focus mode switch on the lens. Make sure it's set to set to "M/A". Beyond that, see if you can narrow the ...


6

If you want to replace the whole grip, sugru is one of the best custom grip/almost anything DIY putty that you can get. It will definitely be able to replace a small grip on a camera


6

There are repair shops that will give you an estimate of repair cost, or even better a no obligation quote. Then it's a simple case of comparing the repair cost with the used value of the equipment (trawling ebay is a good avenue for this), giving a slight bias toward repair to make up for the risk of buying used.


6

Most minor scratches on lens' have an infinitesimal impact on image quality. They look a lot worse than they are, especially in terms of the front element of a lens. This is because the light from a point source in the scene being photographed is spread over the entire area of the lens as it enters the front element before being focused (hopefully) to a ...



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