Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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21

In general there are the following advantages of manual focussing via the optical viewfinder instead of the LCD: The viewfinder image is almost certainly sharper than the LCD, when viewing the entire image. This makes it easier to judge when something is in focus for the times when you need to be able to see the whole image at once (e.g. for a scene that ...


8

Articulated displays are just another moving part that is not typically necessary on pro grade equipment. Adding a screen like that will likely increase the size of the camera, and also make the screen more vulnerable to damage and wear. Some pro series cameras also now have options for external LCD screens that can be attached to the body. Many ...


6

That is what a Camera Finder is for. There are 7 current DSLRs with a rotating display. Those do exactly what you ask for twisting away from the camera body rather than simply tilting up and down as some articulated displays do. For a specific recommendation, the truth is that they are all good, particularly if you cannot tell the difference. Newer ones ...


5

Like rumtscho has said, what you are requesting cannot be done on the D90. I own a D90 and I can say that I only have these options (when exposing for images): Use ViewFinder (LiveView disabled) Use LiveView (ViewFinder disabled) Shoot Tethered (ViewFinder/LiveView disabled [though techically is liveview with image capture being presented over USB rather ...


5

I had a sun shade on my D100 years ago... that lasted exactly one shoot. I'd look into the HoodLoupe. I have a couple. Great product. They're made by Hoodman Corporation — http://hoodmanusa.com/.


5

So, the answer to this is "no", there isn't. You can disable it in some circumstances, but as you've seen, it will keep coming back on. The user interface of many entry-level DSLRs is designed around the rear LCD screen, and these cameras also generally don't offer a huge amount of customization. This is also the case on the D3100, which is roughly a ...


5

It is useful when making pictures from unusual positions: Overhead (e.g. in a crowd) Near the ground (without having to lay on the ground yourself) Self portraits (if the display can be flipped 180°) It can also be used to make shots from hip height without raising awareness of the subjects (they may think you are reviewing photos or changing settings, ...


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


4

I use my camera's LiveView display only when I also need to use its tilt-feature. Otherwise the rear screen is nearly useless to me. These situations come up for example nearly every time I use a tripod, and especially when I aim the camera up towards sky (stars) and it soon becomes physically impossible for me to get a good look in the viewfinder, or even ...


4

It's completely normal under artificial lighting, when frame rate of your camera matches closely flickering rate of the light source (usually determined by frequency of electrical network). If the electricity frequency is n times higher, there will be n lines on screen. When the frequency matches exactly, dark/bright phases of light flickering will always ...


4

You can try covering the panel with Rubylith, astronomers use this a lot to dim bright display. It has a dark red tint to it so you'll still be able to see the display but it should seriously cut down on the eye glare and even retain some of your night vision. (Just some, it isn't perfect.) If the display has a dimmer on it, if you combine that with Rubylith ...


3

You can get the replacement part directly from Canon for about $30-40 USD. It doesn't seem like an overly complicated replacement either, you just have to be a bit DIY to get the job done without throwing your camera across the room. I found a tutorial on how to do it for a 5DMK II here. Once you do replace the cracked protector, I would recommend a ...


3

Many lcd screens, including those on some dSLR cameras already have a "protective screen." Basically the part that you see on the outside and can touch is a hard cover that is non-permanently glued on. Some Nikon models like D3/D700/D300 have tempered glass over the display so chances are you won't nick it easily. The screen on my camera costs like <15 ...


2

Your DSLR has an optical viewfinder (thank god...) rather than EVF like in those compacts, so no - you did not miss such settings. That said, you do have a brightness settings on your menu to enhance the rear LCD. Might not help in full sun, but can make the difference in less demanding situations. Note that it eats your camera's battery faster, though. In ...


2

You can buy shades which clip on on to the LCD and flip out. However, if like me you don't mind looking slightly odd if it saves you money, you can just keep the inner cardboard tube from a toilet paper roll in your kit, then you can just put it against the LCD and look through the other end. Works a treat.


2

I have used both glass and plastic. Giottos (glass) and BestSkinsEver (plastic). Bottomline, the glass is by far the best looking in terms of optical quality. Glare is the same as the LCD itself. However, it is relatively expensive, and the tape that is used is just around the outside, so if it is not done properly or evenly, dust will get in. Being ...


2

To me the biggest advantage of an articulated screen is for video. Using the viewfinder for even a minute will tire you out very quickly, DSLR ergonomics are not really made for video. While using a tripod is of course preferred in many cases it's still reasonably useful to hold the camera at waist height using your neck-strap and record video that way, the ...


2

There are 2 pros as far as I am concerned and they are far less beneficial that the one con. First the two pros: Ability to frame at odd angles, assuming you use Live-View. Ability to reverse the LCD so that it is protected against the camera. Now, the one con which is the reason I avoid buying cameras with a rotating LCD: The hinge is a weak-point and ...


2

Touch screens are "here to stay". There are things that can be done better with a touch screen than with any human interface "I/O" method presently available on cameras. They add abilities at relatively low cost and are interactive and the interface is dynamically adaptive to meet situation and user needs.


2

When shooting in the field, the touchscreen will be rarely used because it's slower to look at and then touch a screen rather than feeling a button and pressing it. Amateurs and casuals users are the target customer for touch screens in these devices. For previewing an image, many people will find it nice to swipe between photos and zoom in. But ...


2

I find it difficult to frame a self-portrait with a flip-around LCD screen simply because, from five or ten feet away, it's so small. I may be able to roughly tell if I'm in the frame, but not always. It might help with the arms'-length selfie, but I'd rather use a lightweight phone for this than an SLR. Having an articulated screen makes composing and ...


1

When you hold a camera with a viewfinder to your eye, your arms are close to your body and it's easy to hold them steady. If you are using the rear screen for composing your photos (in Live View on a DSLR, or in normal view on a mirrorless camera), and you lift the camera to be able to see the back correctly, you now probably hold it out in front of you by ...


1

I found the touch screen to be a good addition to Canon 650D: iPhone-like pintch-to-zoom and image to image swiping with a finger. Compared to a 600D, I was able to navigate between different settings in Quick Control Display (when pressing the 'Q' button) much quicker. It is also possible to completely disable the touchscreen functionality should you ...


1

I used the plastic cover supplied with my Nikon D90 when I first bought it, but a grain of grit got stuck behind it and actually caused a scratch on my screen. Since then, I've been using a rebranded 3M screen protection film and it's much better. There's a knack to it but once you've figured it out you can put it on without any bubbles. I've removed them ...


1

I have used the "Invisible Shield" products for my cameras for years. All 4 of my current cameras are protected by them along with my iPhones and iPods. I am currently unhappy with their customer service but the shields themselves have really worked as advertised for me. I chose to use the sticker option instead of having an additional bit of glass or ...


1

you can use something like this - costs only 12 USD. But I mostly use my baseball cap, to shade the screen.


1

This is a very common problem. No LCD will be bright enough to compete with the sun and the glare off the front of the screen. There are a large number of LCD shades available, which mitigate the problem by allowing you to view the image in a darkened environment. I haven't tried any of these. Other than the added bulk, they look like a good solution.


1

I'm afraid I've got to agree with the others - it's not possible completely. I'm also a D40 shooter and it's annoying late in the evening or at night. While all I need is visible in the viewfinder, the display flashes to the eye from below... I tried to velcro a black rectangle over it. (First a piece of an old 8" floppy and then a thick paper covered by a ...


1

This may not get you all the way, but you can turn off image review. According to http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d40/users-guide/menus-custom.htm, you can do this by going into the menus: Custom (pencil icon) 07 Image Review Set this to Off. To see this, you may need to set Full Menus in the Setup Menu (wrench icon) and be shooting in P, S, A, or M ...



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