Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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21

In general there are the following advantages of manual focussing via the optical viewfinder instead of the LCD: The viewfinder image is almost certainly sharper than the LCD, when viewing the entire image. This makes it easier to judge when something is in focus for the times when you need to be able to see the whole image at once (e.g. for a scene that ...


9

And on top of Matt Grum's almost exhaustive list, viewfinders won't eat up your batteries. (Except if the viewfinder is electronic, but that's luckily quite rare)


8

Articulated displays are just another moving part that is not typically necessary on pro grade equipment. Adding a screen like that will likely increase the size of the camera, and also make the screen more vulnerable to damage and wear. Some pro series cameras also now have options for external LCD screens that can be attached to the body. Many ...


7

I believe this is one of the modes you enable by pressing the INFO button. If you repeatedly press INFO to cycle through all the display modes you will eventually arrive back to the default mode which turns the LCD off.


6

That is what a Camera Finder is for. There are 7 current DSLRs with a rotating display. Those do exactly what you ask for twisting away from the camera body rather than simply tilting up and down as some articulated displays do. For a specific recommendation, the truth is that they are all good, particularly if you cannot tell the difference. Newer ones ...


5

Like rumtscho has said, what you are requesting cannot be done on the D90. I own a D90 and I can say that I only have these options (when exposing for images): Use ViewFinder (LiveView disabled) Use LiveView (ViewFinder disabled) Shoot Tethered (ViewFinder/LiveView disabled [though techically is liveview with image capture being presented over USB rather ...


5

Those are LCD viewfinders. You can find a huge variety of prices and shapes, but they're all basically just a box to block light and make it easier for you to see the LCD screen without any reflections getting in the way.


5

I had a sun shade on my D100 years ago... that lasted exactly one shoot. I'd look into the HoodLoupe. I have a couple. Great product. They're made by Hoodman Corporation — http://hoodmanusa.com/.


5

I just use a toilet roll, which I covered in black tape, then colored the inside with a black permanent marker. Good news is it is cheap, folds flat, has almost no weight and readily available in a pinch.


5

So, the answer to this is "no", there isn't. You can disable it in some circumstances, but as you've seen, it will keep coming back on. The user interface of many entry-level DSLRs is designed around the rear LCD screen, and these cameras also generally don't offer a huge amount of customization. This is also the case on the D3100, which is roughly a ...


5

No, the camera LCD is not better than a laptop screen. Often the gamut of the camera LCD is smaller than a laptop, too. This article discusses some of the issues around the camera LCD. Another factor that you didn't mention but should consider is monitor calibration. If your laptop's display has not been calibrated then you really need to address that first ...


5

It is useful when making pictures from unusual positions: Overhead (e.g. in a crowd) Near the ground (without having to lay on the ground yourself) Self portraits (if the display can be flipped 180°) It can also be used to make shots from hip height without raising awareness of the subjects (they may think you are reviewing photos or changing settings, ...


4

You can try covering the panel with Rubylith, astronomers use this a lot to dim bright display. It has a dark red tint to it so you'll still be able to see the display but it should seriously cut down on the eye glare and even retain some of your night vision. (Just some, it isn't perfect.) If the display has a dimmer on it, if you combine that with Rubylith ...


4

It's completely normal under artificial lighting, when frame rate of your camera matches closely flickering rate of the light source (usually determined by frequency of electrical network). If the electricity frequency is n times higher, there will be n lines on screen. When the frequency matches exactly, dark/bright phases of light flickering will always ...


4

If I understand your question, all you need to do is press the "Lv" button at the right top of the screen. Just had the same issue and it was that simple for me. Hope this helps!


4

I use my camera's LiveView display only when I also need to use its tilt-feature. Otherwise the rear screen is nearly useless to me. These situations come up for example nearly every time I use a tripod, and especially when I aim the camera up towards sky (stars) and it soon becomes physically impossible for me to get a good look in the viewfinder, or even ...


3

In Magic Lantern under 'prefs' under 'image review settings'. Turn off 'quick zoom' All done. Enjoy.


3

You can get the replacement part directly from Canon for about $30-40 USD. It doesn't seem like an overly complicated replacement either, you just have to be a bit DIY to get the job done without throwing your camera across the room. I found a tutorial on how to do it for a 5DMK II here. Once you do replace the cracked protector, I would recommend a ...


3

This is the solution for me: Buy and install the Delkin Pop up Hood that's made specifically for this model camera. It's actually a sun shade with a black cover for the LCD when not in use, but in about 1/2 second, you can pop up the cover to view the LCD if you desire. They cost about $12.


3

And to top it all: using the viewfinder almost forces you to hold the camera in such a way that it will be the most stable platform possible without resorting to a tripod. Thus you'll suffer a lot less from motion blur, composition errors, camera shake, etc. etc.


3

Many lcd screens, including those on some dSLR cameras already have a "protective screen." Basically the part that you see on the outside and can touch is a hard cover that is non-permanently glued on. Some Nikon models like D3/D700/D300 have tempered glass over the display so chances are you won't nick it easily. The screen on my camera costs like <15 ...


3

You're looking for c2: Auto off Timers in the Custom Settings Menu. This is explained on page 160 of the Nikon D5100 Reference Manual — not to be confused with the abridged User's Manual, which leaves out most of the details. It sounds like you are looking to change Auto meter-off, which Nikon describes as the time the "information display remain[s] on when ...


2

Your DSLR has an optical viewfinder (thank god...) rather than EVF like in those compacts, so no - you did not miss such settings. That said, you do have a brightness settings on your menu to enhance the rear LCD. Might not help in full sun, but can make the difference in less demanding situations. Note that it eats your camera's battery faster, though. In ...


2

You can buy shades which clip on on to the LCD and flip out. However, if like me you don't mind looking slightly odd if it saves you money, you can just keep the inner cardboard tube from a toilet paper roll in your kit, then you can just put it against the LCD and look through the other end. Works a treat.


2

To me the biggest advantage of an articulated screen is for video. Using the viewfinder for even a minute will tire you out very quickly, DSLR ergonomics are not really made for video. While using a tripod is of course preferred in many cases it's still reasonably useful to hold the camera at waist height using your neck-strap and record video that way, the ...


2

There are 2 pros as far as I am concerned and they are far less beneficial that the one con. First the two pros: Ability to frame at odd angles, assuming you use Live-View. Ability to reverse the LCD so that it is protected against the camera. Now, the one con which is the reason I avoid buying cameras with a rotating LCD: The hinge is a weak-point and ...


2

I have used both glass and plastic. Giottos (glass) and BestSkinsEver (plastic). Bottomline, the glass is by far the best looking in terms of optical quality. Glare is the same as the LCD itself. However, it is relatively expensive, and the tape that is used is just around the outside, so if it is not done properly or evenly, dust will get in. Being ...


2

When shooting in the field, the touchscreen will be rarely used because it's slower to look at and then touch a screen rather than feeling a button and pressing it. Amateurs and casuals users are the target customer for touch screens in these devices. For previewing an image, many people will find it nice to swipe between photos and zoom in. But ...


2

Touch screens are "here to stay". There are things that can be done better with a touch screen than with any human interface "I/O" method presently available on cameras. They add abilities at relatively low cost and are interactive and the interface is dynamically adaptive to meet situation and user needs.


2

I find it difficult to frame a self-portrait with a flip-around LCD screen simply because, from five or ten feet away, it's so small. I may be able to roughly tell if I'm in the frame, but not always. It might help with the arms'-length selfie, but I'd rather use a lightweight phone for this than an SLR. Having an articulated screen makes composing and ...



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