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15

It's pretty dull isn't it. How about a night shot with a long exposure to get some contrast and glow? Might need to make sure that their logo is illuminated. Other than that maybe a sunrise/sunset shot is an option if the building faces the correct way or wait for some exciting weather to liven it up. Alternatively some 'action' shots with employees doing ...


13

Necessary: Any sort of camera, including that on a phone. But then, I've seen some really bad real estate photos. It seems to me that a good proportion of agents & sellers simply do not care how their listing photos look. It seems crazy, given that a house is very visual and very expensive. When I was house hunting, I saw lots of low resolution, ...


11

Is the Canon 17-40mm L lens good for architecture and real estate photography - Absolutely. Keep in mind that especially at 17mm you will need to remove the barrel distortion in post processing. If you are especially worried about this, and want to take the extra time and attention that it requires, you might be interested in tilt shift lenses or perspective ...


10

These VR images are usually shot with standard camera as a multi image panorama, and then processed in software. The easiest way is to use a special panoramic (sometimes called VR) tripod head which pivots the camera about the exact centre of the lens in order to ensure the photos line up and there's no paralax error. Shooting vertically with a wide angle ...


8

The easiest solution is always the simplest! Borrow or rent a good looking chair from one of yor friends. Put it in the house your friend is selling and take a picture... It would all be done in a couple of hours. Isn't this way simpler then spending the next couple of weeks learning 3DStudio Max? If you are going the 3DS Max route, just make sure it ...


7

I'm fairly new, but I would try to find an angle that makes the building look really big, like from a low angle and make sure you get something in for perspective, like the boss standing in front. I would try for a time when the sun isn't shining on that spot as it looks a little weird to me. Maybe you if you can get it at the tip at the end of the building ...


6

A halo like the ones on the image is always caused by subtle divergence of light coming from a source. Possible remedies: Good quality lenses have anti-reflection coatings on the lens elements to avoid light bouncing back and forth between two element, and lack of this could create this problem. You might need to upgrade your lens. Or, check if you are ...


6

A good overview of the techniques for shooting this type of 360x180/equirectangular/VR panorama can be found on Eric Rougier's fromparis website. The basic process is to shoot enough images to cover the entire sphere, and then stitch them together as a panorama. Mappings Those "six shots" you're seeing are typically remapped cube faces from a full ...


6

A semi fisheye or very wide angle may work for you, but you may well be better off using an edge-of-wideangle lens and panorama stitching or virtual tour software. Very wide angle lenses will invariably introduce what the eye/brain see as distortion. A panorame can be made to feel more normal even if it is effectively introducing distortions of its own (eg ...


6

I briefly flirted with doing real estate photography after we sold our house several years back (and I photographed it). It came down to: an ultra-wide rectilinear lens like the Canon 14mm L to capture an entire room w/out distorting it (much) a perspective correcting lens for outdoors (24mm Tilt-Shift) a really tall tripod for both indoor and outdoors ...


6

You have quite a few questions here. The first that you asked was about an ultra wide angle lens for the Pentax KR. Sigma has an option in the Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM Lens, Pentax also offers the Tamron AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 SP Di II LD Aspherical (IF) Lens. If you are wondering why these two cost around $500, see this previous question: Why are ...


4

The problem with the kind of surface is that the sun will always be reflect on it making the photo dull. I would wait for a better weather preferably cloudy weather where there's light but no sun and you can use warm white balance and saturate your photo a little bit to give warmth to it. Also try to wait for an action in the sky which happens usually if ...


4

One thing I think is a must-have is an Ultrawide lens. For shooting small spaces, the only alternative I can think of is making a stitched photo (pano style), but this requires so much pre and post work to get a good stitch. Here's an example of a standard/small office taken from the same spot with 28-135mm @28mm and 10-22mm @10mm on APS-C camera:


4

You should offer packages that consist of a number of photographs. They buy a 6-shot package and you give them the 6 shots of the rooms they want. You might want to shoot all the rooms and offer additional shots / differnt shots of the same rooms at a small additional.


4

I would certainly suggest the 17-40L over the 16-35L if 95% of your photography is real estate interiors, you don't need f2.8 since the majority of your should will likely be in the f8 or above territory with a tripod for maximum depth of field. My only caution would be that the lens will have noticeable barrel distortion and get a bit soft at the edges, ...


4

An wide-angle lens is a must to get photos straight out of the camera for most interiors. Anything 25mm and under is considered ultra-wide, some cameras go down to 22.5mm now. Frequently that will not be wide enough and so a lot of real-estate photography is done by stitching multiple images together to form a panorama. What you really need to nail this ...


3

Start by cleaning the lens. A dirty lens may cause this, however it is also possible it is simply a property of your lens. If you can't get rid of it, either use a better lens or work around it by taking photos that don't have the lights directly in them.


3

Another option might be to use any camera you want, take numerous pictures of the room, and finally stitch them together with a panorama stitching tool such as the open source (free) Hugin. That way you don't need a super wide angle lens! I do this all the time. I'll try to find a good example and post it up tonight when I get home. Update Here is an ...


3

I find that a 20-28mm lens (full frame) or a 14-20 (cropped sensor) to be the most useful focal lengths. I am a real estate agent that was a professional photographer for 12 years. I shoot primarily my own listings, listing for some of my agents and the occasional paid shoot for various other agents. I personally own a 10-20mm Sigma on a Nikon D7000. I ...


2

The expensive option is to use a full frame sensor camera (Canone EOS 5D for example) with a wide lens ( Canon EF 14mm L or a Canon 16-35mm L for flexibility). This combination provides a very good image quality and fast results. The cheap way is to use what ever lens/camera you have (Canon EOS 60D with a Canon efs 10-22mm, this should look like a 16mm ...


2

I'm an estate agent and use a Nikon P500 bridge camera. It has a 22.5mm lens and I love it as I can add daylight etc. It cost me around £300 and it has been replaced by the P510 (not the same wide angle lens) but it's not been out for too long so you should be able to get a second hand one very cheaply.


2

I'm sorry to say but I think that with the budget constraint given you won't be able to find a camera that provides what you want. To get those 'estate agent' shots that make a gloomy flat look like as spacious as a well lit warehouse you really neeed a specialised wide angle set up. I've only seen it done well with full frame DSLRs and very wide lenses. ...


2

You can buy after market "wide angle adapters" which fit on the filter threads of many cameras. Some camera manufacturers offer these for their own cameras. While the quality is seldom stunningly good, one of these may very well be good enough for your purpose. Here's a few examples: Examples of claimed high quality versions for a range of camera brands ...


2

24mm is ultra-wide but you are right, there are now a few cameras with 22.xmm lens which is slightly wider. You also want to use an add-on flash, so what you are looking for is a ultra-wide-angle camera with a hot-shoe. As you can see from the search link, there are 12 such models, you will have to see which one fits your budget. The Fuji X-S1 is probably ...


2

May be not a camera at all? Have a look at the new Nexus 4 phone which sports an incredible panorama stitching mode. All you'd need is good lighting and a tripod + mount.


1

photographyforrealestate.net has a lot of good information. Probably the most important thing is to straighten your vertical lines. If you have a wall corner that's straight up and down in real life then it should be straight up and down in the picture; not curved or tilted as often happens with wide angle lenses that are raised too high and pointed ...


1

In general, what you care about for real estate photography is angle of view, not focal length per se. The way things work out, the 5mm lens on your SX20 will have an angle of view which is very similar to an 18mm lens on an (entry level) SLR. The easiest way to compare these is to look at "35mm equivalent focal length", which is expressing the focal length ...


1

1) No 2) Modelling from this refrence. If you can take more photos of this chair you can create 3d model from this photos with autodesk new product http://www.123dapp.com/catch.


1

A tripod for long exposures to capture ambient light, a very wide lens for small spaces (e.g. 14/2.8), a wide for medium spaces (35/1.4) and the 50/1.4. I advise against any HDR manipulation as it will change the look of the space, unless the HDR is artfully applied. If you would like to augment ambient light, then as large a softbox as possible (6x4) or ...



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