Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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0

The RX100 requires a minimum of camera raw 7.2 http://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/camera-raw-plug-supported-cameras.html Photoshop CS2 supports camera raw versions 3.0-3.7 http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/camera-raw-compatible-applications.html So you don't need a new computer, but you need a much more recent version of Photoshop(CS6 or ...


0

Well, you've certainly run into "The Photoshop Tax" on new cameras. :) To get Photoshop/ACR to open a RAW file directly, it must be a new enough version that groks the RAW of the camera model. And since RAW is not a file format or a standard, and changes with each camera model, and Adobe has no time-travel capability, this means a version of ACR that came ...


0

The dynamic range that a RAW file takes in is generally much wider than the range used in producing a finished photograph. It contains the actual raw values of the amount of light gathered by each point on the sensor. When adjusting the exposure slider, it shifts the relative interpreted intensity of each pixel based on the amount of light that was ...


3

It's my understanding that most raw converters apply a multiplier to linear values, either demosaiced or not. (The big exception is Adobe.) This mimics more/less exposure in the camera, and the end effect is that a file looks likes it had been exposed in camera at the net exposure (actual exposure + exposure adjustment in the converter). But don't just take ...


1

A quick Google search for "ios raw files" brings up many results: PhotoRAW, Pirawnha, Photogene, Lightroom Mobile. I haven't tested these, so this answer is incomplete, but perhaps someone can go through these, test them out and comment on their pros and cons.


1

Dave Coffin, the author of the popular open source DCRAW conversion application (which powers several other RAW converters) has experience of Canon's RAW format, his website states "I do freelance consulting related to dcraw", see: http://www.cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/ Additionally on his main page he advertises general data recovery services: ...


1

One of the ideas with UniWB is to make the histogram show something that mimics the actual RAW data. The in-camera-histogram is based on the embedded JPG - not the RAW data. Simply put, you get a more correct measurement of the RAW data. As you have this, you may pull up exposure to the limit - as you get a good indication where that actually is - lifting ...


1

The whole point of UNIWB is avoid clipping the RAW data, something which is pretty much irreversible. You ask what the point of this is, since you obviously don't want to use the UNIWB setting in your final image, and hence the red and blue channels will be clipped when applying a standard white balance. However, during RAW conversion you can reduce the ...


7

Of course I don't know. :) However the most common causes for these things are: RAW is "softer" The RAW image isn't 'softer' - JPEG image is doctored in-camera usually with quite aggressive sharpening. Especially on entry-level cameras this sharpening is 'yelling' sometimes and can cause artifacts Besides sharpening, JPEGs usually have in camera some ...


0

"Best" depends on what you're looking for in post-processing software, but a few of the more popular open source packages you could look at using would be: The GIMP with dcraw. The GIMP is the open-source alternative to Photoshop, and has a very deep and sophisticated feature set, with quite a bit more control than you could find in Picasa. Tutorials are ...


0

GIMP + dcraw plugin. Simple to use and have everything you need. Here is GIMP and here is dcraw.


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RawTherapee is quite good and "feature packed" and works on multiple platforms.One of its strengths has always been its excellent highlight recovery. In addition, it added last year two demosaicing algorithms optimized for noisy images. I tested them and they a markedly superior to anything else out there.


0

I don't know the actual reason for JPEG/RAW mode, but it's the mode I use most of the time. Occasionally somebody asks me for a particular photo, and it's easier, faster, and more convenient to give them the JPEG than to load it on my laptop and edit in LightRoom or Capture One. RAW + JPEG is also nice because sometimes the out of camera JPEG is "good ...


1

My understanding is that the convention of RAW+JPEG started early in pro digital photography (like Sports Illustrated at a bowl game) when computers were slower than they are today and RAW file tools more cumbersome to use. The idea would be that Photo Editors would look through the JPEG files to find the shots they needed. They then sent the corresponding ...


0

You can't. Lightroom (LR) ignores the in camera settings that were in effect at the time the photo was taken and applies its own preset or auto settings. When you first open a RAW file with Digital Photo Professional (DPP) applies the in-camera settings that were active at the time the image was recorded to the preview you see on your screen. If you are ...


0

In-camera .jpg produces more accurate colors. At least, that is my experience, especially with artificial lighting. For an example where post-production converters failed, see here. Not only did Lightroom fail, but the raw converter from the same manufacturer could not even produce the right colors. I was really glad I happened to have raw+jpg enabled that ...


1

For Canon, bot Microsoft and Canon itself provide the codecs to preview RAW files, with the difference that Microsoft's supports also 64-bit systems. I've tried Microsoft's and it works smoothly, I haven't tried Canon's and therefore I can't make comparisons. Nikon also provides codecs for Windows, both 32 and 64-bit systems. I find Window's image viewer ...


0

I shoot JPEG + RAW when I use my older cameras with bad displays such as the 1Ds mk II. The display of that camera is almost useless (but the image quality is great) and I need another way of quickly confirm that focus is correct etc. I use a WiFi enabled memory card to transfer the JPEG:s to my tablet for quick review and then I import the RAW files to my ...


0

Saving in jpeg should not add noise. Yes it does not retain 100% of the data, but unless you use a very low quality factor when saving, you won't see any difference between a jpeg and a file in a lossless format under normal circumstances. But you are, so something odd is going on. So- here are some troubleshooting questions that I thought of: What quality ...


0

This happened to me. After using the camera for a while I found when I switched to Jpeg+Raw I copied the files over to the folder on my PC and had two jpegs. This puzzled me as I knew I had used that once before and my PC had no problem with raw files, and I had .CR2 files on my hard drive to prove it. I was convinced the Camera was not now recording the ...


2

This happened to me. After using the camera for a while I found when I switched to Jpeg+Raw I copied the files over to the folder on my PC and had two jpegs. This puzzled me as I knew I had used that once before and my PC had no problem with raw files, and I had .CR2 files on my hard drive to prove it. I was convinced the Camera was not now recording the ...


0

In the end I ended up importing two backup lrproj files Lightroom had made automatically into my current project. This resulted in up to 3 duplicate virtual copies, but it also restored all of my development adjustments. I then created a new smart collection that filtered all virtual copies without adjustments. Steps can be found here. ...


2

Lightroom generally stores the changes you have made and the history of changes you have made in the lrproj file. If you have moved the images, it is still possible to use your existing project, however you must first tell it the location of the new files. When you view the catalog in your original project, it should show little question marks overlayed ...



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