Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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0

As no-one else has mentioned it already... Lightroom is fine. It can convert raw images. Does a reasonable job of them. Got a copy, use it periodically. But I've never been able to get images out of it that match what I can produce from Capture One from my Nikon or Olympus cameras. Back to back conversions on the same file, experimenting with all sorts of ...


1

This is a very old question but it remains relevant so I'll add my 3 cents. Lightroom's white balance presets seem to be just ballpark figures not tuned to any camera-specific properties. The best way to get Nikon/Canon/whatever-like rendition in Lightroom is described here and here. Basically: Take some photos with your camera using built-in white ...


4

For most (maybe all) manufacturers/cameras, the picture styles are not applied to raw images and so it just doesn't matter. It may (also dependent on camera/software/software version) change the way the postprocessing is done if the raw metadata tells the software about the picture style used and the software cares about that, but technically it does not ...


0

While there is a colour profile selection in ACR which mimics the manufacturers profile no settings will be picked up from RAW file and be reapplied to make the photo in editor look similar to JPEG of camera. It happens so because manufacturer settings are often too special and follow no standard. While being technically possible it is rarely required by ...


3

No, there is no practical way of deducing one of images from "multiexposure" serie which results in single file.


0

The OP asked for a 35mm scanner. Depending on the quantity of originals to scan, a dedicated 35mm scanner may prove faster (in relative terms). I have a Canon 35mm scanner and an Epson V600. Both use either Silverfast or Vuescan. I can understand the RAW requirement, but for all intent and purposes a TIFF file will do as well. Color slides and negatives are ...


1

If you're using darktable, then select the image in lighttable mode and push 'duplicate'. The button can be found under the 'selected images' control group. Relevant User Manual Page


1

Why do you want to store them in sidecars specifically? If Adobe Lightroom is an option for you, this software is purpose-built for this sort of scenario. You can create multiple "virtual copies" of the same image in the Lightroom library, and develop them in different ways. The settings are not stored in multiple sidecar files, but it's unclear what ...


1

Regards the hundreds of similar shots, pick one of the bunch and Lightroom process it, sharpen etc, Switch back and select all from the bunch bar the one. Finally get Lightroom to apply the last settings to all selected photos. That should speed up the workflow and mass produce satisfying results. Why not give it a try and see if you like it?


0

If you are routinely shooting hundreds of pictures of the same object, you should consider shooting many of these at exactly the same settings. This allows you to replace the demosaicing step where the raw processor uses interpolation to get to RGB values for each pixel. This is always going to be rather inaccurate, especially if there is a lot of noise. ...


2

I scan negatives and slides to create RAW files. It is largely a matter of scanner resolution limits and software. I use an Epson V700 which has a transparency scanner, film holders and a selection of software. It also can scan natively to 6400 pixels per inch. The software I use is Silverfast and Vuescan. Scanning film at sufficient resolution can be a ...


1

I always shoot in RAW. ... I do this because I'm an amateur and I like to experiment and I have a happy trigger finger. It's good to know this about yourself. When you're learning, spray'n'pray is a natural trap to fall into. Some of the photos look just fine the way they are, but is it necessary to post-process it in RAW? ... I like to edit ...


0

Think of the RAW data file as your negative. You can post process it at any time or in any way that you want. As image processing software changes and gains new features, you can reprocess your image in any manner you wish in newer software. You should keep the RAW file because it is the only complete record of the slice of time you had wanted to capture and ...


0

In addition to the above I don't know if anyone mentioned in camera post processing. It's not as glamorous as photoshop but you can change color balance and lighting in addition to adding a little sharpnes (quick retouch)


-2

Just to clarify what a RAW image is, it is the EXACT data from the camera sensor (and RAW images can actually be used for forensic analysis because of this) as well as information about the camera settings that were used when the image was shot (such as white balance). That means that, with a RAW image, you can basically fix any issue caused by camera ...


0

You are not "obliged" to post-process it. If you like the image that the raw data shows you and you feel it needs no changes then by your own criteria it looks good so do nothing to it, unless in the future you change your mind and think it should be changed. You still have the raw file and can do anything you like. I shoot raw only,I would never let the ...


13

Raw data must always be converted in one way or another for it to be a viewable image at all. When you open a raw file using any image viewer application you are not viewing the raw image (because there is no such thing - there is only raw data). You are either viewing the jpeg preview created in camera and embedded in the raw file or you are viewing a ...


17

From what I understand of your question, you're asking whether a Straight Out Of Camera (SOOC) RAW file should be edited to look "good". The short answer is "Yes, it should go through post-processing". Most (all?) cameras apply their own algorithms to jpg images - in other words, the manufacturer set up the camera to apply what they believe to be ...


0

The anecdotal evidence I hear on motion-shooting forums is that the Transcend Class-10s are good. And yes, motion shooting is definitely more demanding on the card. Burst mode simply stores the images in the camera's RAM and then when you're done writes them out to the card at the usual single-shot speed. Problems with motion shooting do not mean you'll ...


-1

I would say that this is a sensor issue because sensor is read line by line. If NEF files are losslessly compressed (this may be switched off IIRC) card corruption will not cause these simple artifacts and will rather cause box artifacts or whole image corruption. The ADC converter is a bottleneck which gets all the throughput. There are not much more than ...


1

I use dcraw -o 0 -D -T -4 This preserves the 12- or 14-bit integer pixel values exactly as they were recorded in the raw file, without any processing or rescaling. (Thanks to Patrick Hurley) I saw it in your other questions that ultimately you import the data to Mathematica. In Mathematica you can import a raw file directly as Import["something.nef", ...


2

My 2 cents here. I have some high-quality RAW files. This is important. Let us move on. I need to have them printable at about twice the size I get with the ppi set to 240. I gess the 240 ppi is a preset of the camera... Well, you can modify that value to whatever value you need. Normal people, won't see a diference on a 100ppi photo and a ...


5

Based on your question at Mathematica.SE I assume that you simply summed up the integer values for each pixel in the raw file, and the total was greater than what you assume to be the number of incident photons. First, how do you know what is the actual number of incident photons and are you sure your estimate is correct? Assuming that your photon count ...


3

There are several things which one should take into account to answer this question: no camera may generate 1 electron per 1 photon across wide range of wavelengths. Example of monochrome IR-sensitive sensor efficiency. Bayer colour sensing camera is based upon generating less photons in response to certain wavelengths. Spectral response of D3 with IR ...


0

The best algorithm should attempt to fill in the missing details as best as possible, which means that they must be based on so-called "super resolution" methods. This looks impossible to do using a single image, however, as explained in this paper, one can make use of the repetitions in a single picture, similar objects appear multiple times on different ...


2

Magic Lantern has a RAW video mode - but it is only for Canon DSLR's.



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