Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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1

Welcome to the "Photoshop Tax" on getting a new camera body. The main thing to keep in mind is that RAW is not an acronym, a file format, or a standard. It's merely a file that contains the unprocessed (raw) contents of a sensor data dump. Every camera model has a different RAW file format. The .CR2 files from a 5DMKII are different from the .CR2 files ...


0

You can save DNG if you want, but you can also save RAW+XMP. (which would take significantly less space than RAW+DNG) To export your Lightroom adjustments to an XMP sidecar file, either automatically or manually on demand, see here: 1.Choose Edit > Catalog Settings (Windows) or Lightroom > Catalog Settings (Mac OS). 2.Click the Metadata tab, and then ...


-2

Both I suggest. Each contains unique data that is not preserved in the other. RAW has fine graduation detail, the edited version has your work invested in it. Also make more than one archive copy, keep on separate media in different physical locations.


6

You will always have one value touch the top of the graph because the scale is set to match the max Y value. It's not important what that Y value is, only it's relative proportion to the other Y values (hence, no numbers, ever). Below is an image that is 50% black and 50% white and you can see the graph is peaked on both sides. You can't see it in the ...


6

The scale is somewhat arbitrary, and it is adaptive. That is, it's automatically scaled in an attempt to remain as useful as possible, given the image and its current adjustments. If you create an image in Photoshop that has a perfectly even distribution of colour or grey tones (let's say a 256-pixel image with one pixel each of every shade of grey from ...


0

Someone at Adobe says: It is the same as photographic exposure, but like Lee Jay says, in Lr 4 Beta with PV 2012 the response is more similar to film. Photographic exposure simply means that an increase in 1 stop means doubling the amount of light (photons) and decrease in 1 stop means halving the amount of light. This is still very much the ...


1

Proper exposure would be simply a multiplication in linear space, so the shape would have to change as values get redistributed. What you are thinking of would happen if they did an addition to all the pixels. That would also change the exposure but would not correspond in any way closely to what happens in case you had changed the exposure in-camera. In ...


0

I answered this queston. But I just noticed, that I postet my answer under an other question. oooops! Here you can find my answer. I did this with Lightroom 5.


1

I think I have a good workaround. Of course a plugin for this task would still be the best. I did this with Lightroom 5. Add the photos you want to convert to the (empty!) Quick Collection and select them all. You could also just select the photos without adding them to any collection. But then it's VERY important that you don't (accidently) unselect any ...


5

Since you have a D5300, the answer is clear — Darktable just added support for that camera in version 1.4.2, at which point it was listed as "experimental". Darktable 1.6 was released a month ago (December 2014), so upgrading to that should solve your issue. If it doesn't, I'd add your feedback (and a sample file?) to this issue tracker request: Feature ...


0

I would go with Adobe Lightroom. You can process catalog, set of photos or photo by clicking "File > Export.." and set not only dimension of photos but also add watermark, sharpen them for printing or screen, rename and much more. It's also great tool for editing photos and applying same styles for all photos take literally seconds. You can check exporting ...


1

I would like to suggest that you give editing in raw another chance and at least don't dispose of the originals. Lightroom tools may not provide as much control over the contents of an image as other tools like Photoshop, but they are based on best practices. One can read 335 pages of Image Sharpening and painfully apply the knowledge via luminosity ...


0

If disk space is not a problem then is there a reason why you can't keep both RAW and TIFF versions of your images? I shoot in RAW, then use my SLR's bundled software to preview all of the images, deleting any which are hopelessly composed, out of focus, blurred, or otherwise worthless. Then I use the software to squeeze everything I can out of the RAW ...


2

Export to TIFF, but don't delete the RAW until you need more space, and then purge the oldest.


1

I'm not aware of any direct way as Lightroom is designed to be non-destructive. Do an export to TIFF with the option to import to catalog after export. Then delete the RAW files and remove all the missing files from your catalog.


0

thanks to Mr. Romeo and User 35658 and Happy new year too all of you :) after a lot of experiments I figure out the problem. The problem where in Nikon Transfer Utility. I used to use it and I did't have any problem with it, but it seems like a corruption happened to the software and it affect all my RAW photos transfered from the camera to my PC. I ...


-3

In simple terms.....no. As mentioned jpegs are compressed, so they throw away information. Raw has more information. But if the conversion from raw to jpegs is not done right, then your original jpegs may look better. Typically when converting from raw you need to increase contrast and add sharpening.


0

Yes, in one particular aspect: lens distortion/vignetting/aberration correction. Almost by definition -- and I know for sure on my Nikon -- RAW files are not corrected, while JPEGs are. If your camera has that option, of course. I've been trying the major free RAW processing programs, and not all support distortion, aberration, and vignette correction -- in ...


0

Use the NEF codec from Nikon if you don't need support for other camera brands. You'll probably have to use the menued preview option (or right-click and use the context menu) to open the files in Windows Photo Viewer, but you will be able to use Photo Viewer and see thumbnails in Explorer.


0

Actually, the image information in RAW files is in TIFF. To quote from the Wikipedia article on RAW: Many raw file formats, including IIQ (Phase One), 3FR (Hasselblad), DCR, K25, KDC (Kodak), CR2 (Canon), ERF (Epson), MEF (Mamiya), MOS (Leaf), NEF (Nikon), ORF (Olympus), PEF (Pentax), RW2 (Panasonic) and ARW, SRF, SR2 (Sony), are based on the TIFF file ...



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