India Point Park

India Point Park
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0

Raw files are basically digital negative of an image. At the same time jpeg is optimized output created by camera. jpeg cannot contain so much data that a raw file can, so its impossible to convert a jpeg image to raw.


3

There exist methods to do this, but as Alex. S also points out in his answer, there are no standard tools that I'm aware of that will do it for you. In principle, it's a straightforward problem. While there are a vast number of mathematically possible raw files that are consistent with the given JPEG file, the vast majority of those are not likely to be the ...


4

You cannot (should not) produce a raw from a jpeg. Theoretically it would be possible as compressed NEF is based on a TIFF container and a "wide" JPEG/JFIF variant IIRC. And all is not lost as, having run these kinds of competitions, I can say that you may still be able to enter depending on what type of competition it is and why they want raw files... ...


25

In addition to the points Alex S made, you need to consider why they want RAW. There are several possible reasons: Bit depth as Alex S said. JPG suffers from compression artefacts which RAW doesn't. Blown up to exhibtion size these can jump out and ruin a print. Having the RAW file is often used as a proxy for having taken the photo, as RAWs aren't ...


27

RAW is not (or minimally) processed image data from camera sensor. JPEG is processed image data. Typically, raw-files from modern cameras have 12-14-bit per pixel which means up to 16384 values (for more details see Michael Clark's comment). JPEG can have only 256 luminance values per RGB channel. This means that jpeg contains much less data than a ...


1

Yes, Lightroom has a similar feature to Aperture's that could let you do what you want--assuming you actually have the bandwidth and patience to transfer half a gig of files to your cloud drive. The feature is called Smart Previews. It was a feature designed both for using Lightroom on tablets, as well as for being able to work on images on an external ...


1

This is not an artifact of the Sony file format, but is related to your lens. All lenses have some amount of optical imperfections/distortion, but camera manufacturers now are compensating for these imperfections through the use of software-based "lens correction". As the earlier answer explains, one software is displaying the image with the lens correction ...


4

When you are opening the images with FastStone, you are likely seeing the JPEG preview generated in-camera and attached to the raw file. If your camera is set to apply lens correction or distortion correction then it is likely being applied to the image when the JPEG preview is generated. Lightroom generally ignores in-camera settings for things such as ...


4

Most definitely not a stupid question: I actually wondered the same thing when I first got into shooting raw. Before you can really understand what's happening when you adjust exposure in software, you first need to know what a digital camera's sensor and electronics do when you take a photo: count photons. Each pixel of the sensor essentially records the ...


6

There is nothing special or magical in RAW files. When it comes to exposure and balance, RAW files just store more information about colors, than JPEG files do. Either way, these colors consist of Red, Green, and Blue values and by manipulating these values you can always adjust white balance or exposure, regardless of the file type... in the ideal world. ...


8

You are not actually adding light, you are simply enhancing what little light you gathered. With a JPEG, "stretching" or "pushing" and "attenuating" are all done in the camera, and those enhancements are baked into the JPEG file, which is then lossy compressed and stored in a low precision format (8-bpc, 0-255). With a RAW image, you are storing the ...


0

Have you tried Lightzone? I have a Fuji XE1 and Lightzone works perfectly. You can join and download for free from the project's website http://www.lightzoneproject.org/


3

You've tested with multiple cards/readers. That's definitely indicative of a problem with the camera itself. Some additional tests are:- plug a cable into the camera directly. copy the files to a different machine. You might have a USB problem there that you didn't know about. view the nef using different software (for example ViewNX.) copy the same ...


0

I was missing a sanity check for "same content" in the previous answers, because I had duplicate names for different pictures, because I had forgotten to enable the image counter in my camera. So, here's my version, which checks the EXIF information for same capture time (working on Mac OS X): you would need to sudo port install rmtrash exiv2 before you ...


3

The MacOS X feature that's responsible for showing you previews in Finder, Spotlight, standard file dialogs, etc., is called QuickLook. QuickLook needs an importer for each type of file that you'd like to preview. For standard types like text files, JPEG and PNG images, sounds, and others, the system has built-in QuickLook importers. In other cases, ...


1

so i encountered this problem as well and just found out that by opening camera raw preferences and unchecking performance box i was able to make it work. in my case i am using an all-in-one PC that has integrated graphics. perhaps the performance presets didn't agree with Photoshop's requests....


1

Several ifs involved here. If you can see an image to edit I would assume that the originals were saved with smart previews enabled. If so, any edits to the preview will be applied to the original when the xmp's which are created are 'reunited' with the originals. According to Adobe: "Note: Smart Previews are stored in the [Catalog Name] Smart ...



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