Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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0

higher bit depth of raw files makes the files less susceptible to posterization during editing information from shadows and highlights can be retrieved more easily in raw files in some raw editors, the edits are not done to the actual data, but are included as recipes. So if you make the image super bright, save, open and make it dark again, you don't lose ...


1

JPEG compression quality is not the main limiting factor for the images coming out of camera. Also, it could well be possible to store sparse data to JPEG files - i.e. saving absent channel values as 0 - and make it comparable to RAW file size or less than that. Following aspects are the reason for using RAW files: the image which camera gets from the ...


3

There is a lot more information in a raw file than in a processed jpeg file (or an 8-bit PNG or TIFF). When converted to jpeg many things are "baked in": White balance, black point, white point, gamma correction, other properties of the response curve from dark to light values of each pixel, etc. Once that information is gone, it can't be recovered. ...


1

It is about the accumulation of errors. With a higher bit-depth, RAW files can handle more processing before you start seeing banding and quantization artifacts. You will eventually see those with RAW files that are manipulated too just later. So the primary advantage indeed comes from bit-depth. Another common concern is compression artifacts. When you ...


1

I've got the same problem with my GX8 and wanted to have some kind of preview in Windows Explorer. I searched for hours and finally decided to try out and then buy FastPictureViewer Codec Pack. It's very fast, but the preview image is not 100% accurate (you can see that when zooming in).


-1

WTF.....!!!! Sagethumbs anyone? It will let you view any of those extension in windows explorer. Why pay $10 for a program (especially one that is not near as good as free ones out there) when you have a free extension for windows that works flawlessly. The accepted answer is obviously a spam answer.


0

You are not alone. This thread ("Microsoft Camera Codec Pack for Windows 10 64-bit") at answers.microsoft.com seems to indicate that as of June 25, 2016, there still was no solution from Microsoft. The basic gist is to try to install the Windows 8.1 Camera Codec Pack. A straightforward installation attempt doesn't seem to work. It seems that users were able ...


2

I have a Nikon D3s, only take raw files from the camera, and keep active D-lighting on most of the time. The purpose of ADL is to avoid blowing highlights that are too small or off-target to be otherwise metered. This is a common problem with digital cameras, especially point and shoots. Imagine a scene where most of it is in open shadow, but someone off ...


0

I had a huge problem with active D lighting causing me to wind up with underexposed RAW files. Basically it was lifting all the shadows in a shot by about 4.5 stops (it was on extra high). That resulted in photos that had the bare minimum exposed in the shadows looking like perfectly exposed images (perfect to edit later). This was more in ambient lit, ...


1

Part of the problem here is that Canon is not consistent, and does not follow normal conventions, in their file name suffixes. The original Canon RAW file was .CRW (Canon Raw). This was changed to .CR2 (Canon Raw Version 2). Then the trouble starts. The CR2 format has been changed. You'd expect therefore to see a new suffix each time the file format ...


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In the context of RAW vs JPG I do not think that there are any "cons" to shooting RAW instead of JPG. I think the cons to shooting JPG only is that you are giving away your creative control of the image and thus it is not just your image but a collaboration between you and your cameras software ( or the person who wrote the code.) If you are comfortable with ...


4

In the iOS 10.0 release notes, there are two mentions of RAW images: The new AVCapturePhotoOutput class provides a unified pipeline for all photography workflows, enabling more sophisticated control and monitoring of the entire capture process and including support for new features such as Live Photos and RAW format capture. You should transition to ...


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I screwed up and moved my catalog without having the XMP data backed up. Was at a loss for answers but stumbled across this free Lightroom add-on that rips adjustments from JPEG files. Thankfully, I had exported my images to JPEG to post to a website. So I only had to load each photo and rip the data for each one. It doesn't reset your rotations or crops, ...


1

The thing you've got to remember is that you never really see a "raw" file on your monitor when using an application that handles raw file editing and conversion. (Yes, there are ways to view linear, un-demosaiced luminance values on a monitor. Even then there needs to be some compression of dynamic range to fit 12-14 bits of dynamic range into 8 bits. But ...


3

A RAW file contains sensor data which is not affected by effects. To speed up preview though, nearly all RAW files store an embedded JPEG to which effects are usually applied to coincide with what the camera settings are. It also used images parameters, including color modes, WB and selectable tone curve as you can edit them in the E-M10. The tricky part is ...


7

Are the effects really being applied, or are they just showing up in the preview image of the application you use? For example, I can apply in-camera effects to my RAW images, and these effects will appear in my RAW editing software (Adobe Bridge & Camera Raw) as a preview image. Once opened for editing though, the edit disappears. Have you tried opening ...


2

Back in the 1980s, Craig Anderton wrote a book called Home Recording for Musicians in which he observed that a recording studio isn't a capturer of reality, it's a processor of reality. You should think of your camera the same way. The light making up an image enters the lens, which changes it, reaches the sensor, which changes it, is passed through ...


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It varies highly from camera to camera. Some designs do a minimum of processing on the image sensor itself, others do a little more. Those that do more do so mainly in the area of noise reduction either before or after sending the analog data to be converted to digital data. One method is the relative amplification of the signal from pixels masked for red, ...



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