Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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1

The CHDK (Canon Hack Development Kit) adds RAW capabilities to Canon powershot digital cameras, according to the FAQ: It is likely that any Canon Powershot based on the DIGIC II, DIGIC III or DIGIC 4 platforms can be supported The current list of supported cameras from that same FAQ with the firmware version: A410: 100e, 100f A420: 100b A430: 100b ...


2

It appears most of what you are seeing is due to the use of high Clarity and Vibrance settings coupled with faster rendering options in the Lr preview window. Depending on how you've got your viewing quality options selected, Lightroom may or may not be actually recomputing the raw data to produce the preview you see from within Lightroom. If you've got ...


0

It is most definitely the monitor brightness. at first I worked with shutter shutter speed, ISO and brightness in general, but the images would all come out drastically different once uploaded onto my computer. What I ended up doing was simple. I put my computer (iMac) and my camera (D3200) side by side. I took some photos, uploaded them to my computer (...


2

DRO stands for Dynamic Range Optimization. It is designed to fit more dynamic range into images. A single exposure is still taken so you are always limited to the sensor's latitude. However, from what the sensor captures, more or less of that range is mapped into images. With fixed values, the transform is applied the same to each image. With Auto, it ...


1

Our eyes can see over a super broad range of light levels from sunlight at the beach to black cats in coal mines. The cameras, as a general rule lacks this ability. In photography we use the f/stop as a unit that expresses exposure. The f/stop system is base on a halving or doubling of the light that is allowed to play on the camera’s digital sensor. When ...


2

885x1024 sounds like your contact emailed the image to you and his email software/system has resized the image. Ask them to zip the image file and send it again, or use an online service like dropbox or OneDrive.


0

You could resample the photo to the larger size(s) in Photoshop, but the lost detail would not be recovered and it would just look like a slightly blurred image. You need to ask the photographer for the images in higher resolution - either ask him or her to create those specific resolutions for you, or just to give you the original source resolution and let ...


1

There are many good reasons here, but here are some other reasons I can think of. JPEG is a standardized format. Most RAW files are not. Programs rely on the RAW profiles to be installed to process them and allow you to work with them. There is DNG and TIFF/EP that aim to standardize RAW files, but very few cameras have adopted these. If for whatever ...


1

higher bit depth of raw files makes the files less susceptible to posterization during editing information from shadows and highlights can be retrieved more easily in raw files in some raw editors, the edits are not done to the actual data, but are included as recipes. So if you make the image super bright, save, open and make it dark again, you don't lose ...


2

JPEG compression quality is not the main limiting factor for the images coming out of camera. Also, it could well be possible to store sparse data to JPEG files - i.e. saving absent channel values as 0 - and make it comparable to RAW file size or less than that. Following aspects are the reason for using RAW files: the image which camera gets from the ...


4

There is a lot more information in a raw file than in a processed jpeg file (or an 8-bit PNG or TIFF). When converted to jpeg many things are "baked in": White balance, black point, white point, gamma correction, other properties of the response curve from dark to light values of each pixel, etc. Once that information is gone, it can't be recovered. ...


2

It is about the accumulation of errors. With a higher bit-depth, RAW files can handle more processing before you start seeing banding and quantization artifacts. You will eventually see those with RAW files that are manipulated too just later. So the primary advantage indeed comes from bit-depth. Another common concern is compression artifacts. When you ...



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