Sunset in Kruger

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12

While Google created an API in Android Lollipop that exposes RAW images from the camera, Android leaves it up the each phone manufacturer as to whether they will make the camera RAW available to the user. Therefore, to gain access to RAW images, you need the phone manufacturer to enable it, and software to take advantage of it. And yes, it is possible for a ...


9

When you shoot monochrome as RAW files, the monochrome setting is just meta-data in the RAW file. The raw data from the sensor is still the same. You will only see the monochrome effect when you view the file in a program that supports the monochrome flag. Obviously what you are using to preview the images doesn't support it. The program from Nikon for ...


7

The first thing you must realize is that what you are seeing on your monitor is not the raw file. What you are seeing is an 8-bit demosaiced preview conversion of the raw file created by Photoshop based on the current settings. You may even be seeing the embedded jpeg preview in the raw file that was produced by the camera at the time you took the photo if ...


6

The JPEG format is very good for final output, filesizes are small and with the highest quality settings artifacts are pretty much invisible. It's only if you start editing a JPEG that you will see artifacts and the limited dynamic range. So it's a bad format if you plan to later edit images. If you plan to later edit images than RAW is far better than ...


5

Wouldn't it be useful to have a 24-bit RGB format (taking advantae of the camera's automatic processing modes)? Not really. Raw files are actually very space efficient, since they only store one greyscale channel, in 12 or 14 bit per pixel. A lossless 24bit format will inevitably create larger files, while dropping 4 or 6 bits of dynamic range. A 48bit ...


4

Some do — for example, most or all Pentax models and higher-end Nikons support TIFF (which, as Raheel Khan notes in a comment above, is better for metadata than PNG). So, there you go. If this is important to you, you can choose a camera which has it. However, it seems that it's not important enough to most consumers to make it something people decide on — I ...


3

What you're seeing is consistent with data corruption in that the preview lo-res jpeg is fine, and that the compressed raw has a number of incorrect or missing bytes causing corruption. The question Why do images get "corrupted"? describes the effect at the file level. Use of a different file format (raw rather than jpeg) will give you different output but ...


3

The particular lossy compression used here is nothing to worry about. Here's why. Camera sensors are more or less linear devices, if you double the amount of light you double the signal produced by the sensor. Our eyes work logarithmically, so if you double the amount of light, it appears much less than twice as bright. Another example of this is if you ...


2

Even with lossy compression the NEF file still contains a lot more information than a JPEG file. There is considerably more data per pixel in the NEF file. Even if the 14 bits color depth is reduced somewhat by the compression, it's still way more than the 8 bits of a JPEG image. You won't see much difference between the JPEG and the NEF in a direct ...


2

UFRaw should now (since late 2014 / v0.20) support Fuji X-Trans filters. The RAW files have been supported for a long time. Sample photos I've found convert well. I don't have your exact model to try with, but for anyone looking for an answer to this, you should try it. Darktable also has support in an experimental branch (1.5) and is expected to have it in ...


2

File size is one good reason. My 5DII spits out raw files at around 24MB each and when converted to 16Bit TIFFs they weigh in at around 126MB, uncompressed. With compression they can still hit around 70MB which isn't as memory card friendly as the initial 24MB. Your question mentions .PNG files - the uncompressed 16Bit .PNG equivalent is still 115MB so ...


2

The difference in DR between the A7R and D810 is due to a new iteration of the sensor design which has a lower minimum hardware ISO setting, nothing to do with RAW compression. ARW compression first maps the linear 14-bit image into a non-linear 11-bit space. This does not compromise dynamic range as more bits are allocated to the shadows than the ...


2

While shooting in B/W with RAW mode might give you a preview of how would it appear in monochrome, but when you shoot in RAW no matter what effects you have applied during shooting, it will show the raw data from the sensor.


2

That depends almost entirely on the hardware. Android has had raw support in the software since Eclair (2.0, API level 5), but it was always left to a manufacturer-specific format if the hardware could provide anything that could be called raw. Most of the mobile chipsets in circulation run the camera entirely in silicon and burp out JPEGs, and that's been ...


1

I use Capture One Pro from Phase One. Opinions differ on this versus Lightroom, but I find that overall Capture One works more like I do. Here's the rub. If you have experience with a different RAW converter, you will need to start unlearning that workflow. Fortunately, Phase One has great instructional videos online. On the minus side for C1, using it as a ...


1

Essentially this is a color management issue. Lightroom uses the ProPhoto RGB color space in the Develop module that you are in. It is likely that you are exporting the image using a different color profile like sRGB. It is also possible that your Color Profile setting for windows is set to sRGB and that is what Windows Photo Viewer is using. Note that in ...



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