Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Many of the things you want to eliminate are actually important for answering this question in the real world. In practice, image quality almost never comes down to sensor characteristics. I'm a little reminded of this Monty Python sketch..... when you eliminate all of the image quality factors other than the sensor, sure, the sensor is the only spec left. ...


10

The point of bracketing in the context you described is to come up with a higher dynamic range that the one you can get with a single picture because you want or need to do it. Even if RAW has more bits per channel than JPEG, it still have a limited dynamic range. So depending of the scene you have in front of you, you will want or need to take pictures ...


9

TIFF is a container format which supports a collection of other standards and like any container what's in it will be entirely down to what you (or whoever wrote the TIFF export you're using) has decided to put in it. At a guess from the file size your converter has gone to 16bpc/RGB uncompressed. If so then that file size looks about right. If it is ...


7

Bracketing is useful when the scene exceeds the dynamic-range of the camera. That is it. There is no answer that applies all the time because it depends on the scene.


6

If I assume that the default 0 EV has reasonable exposure, does this mean that the -1 and +1 RAWs are more or less redundant? If the exposure is reasonable in both the shadows and highlights — that is, the scene has a dynamic range that easily fits within what the camera can capture — then yes, you're right. Bracketed exposure doesn't do much for you. ...


6

In general the top tier Compact Flash cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels when compared to the top tier Secure Digital cards available to the typical consumer via retail channels are: More rigid and less susceptible to damage from flexing Rated for more extreme environmental conditions (higher altitude, lower temperature, etc.) Have ...


5

Any time you view a "raw" image, you aren't really viewing the raw image. You are either viewing a preview image created by the camera and embedded in the raw file at the time the photo was captured or you are viewing a conversion of the raw image made for display on your monitor by the application at the time you open the image file. My intuition is that ...


4

I've found that bracketing by ±1 or ±2EV doesn't help, but bracketing by ±3EV does. I did the following experiment: First, I picked a high dynamic range scene, short of directly shooting the sun. Here, the sun was partially behind thin clouds, and it was uncomfortably bright to look at with the naked eye. In other words, it was much brighter than it looks ...


4

Let me add the issue of noise to the answers already given. Suppose that the 0 EV exposure is good enough, the shadows are not underexposed, the bright areas are not overexposed, then it's still the case that using the +1 EV exposure (for the parts that are not overexposed) will yield a lower noise picture. By exposing for longer and then adjusting the ...


4

Each control has two different uses; to compensate for shortcomings in the original exposure, or to add an effect to the image. In a certain range the control has the first use, beyond that it has the second use. The problem is that there is no specific values where a control goes from compensating to effect, and in each case there isn't even a specific ...


3

Michael is right. More precisely: The RAW image contains two images: the embedded JPEG preview, which has your camera's processing applied including noise reduction, and the RAW data. When you open your image with an image viewer, you usually see the JPEG preview. In darktable, by default, you will see the JPEG preview in lighttable mode before you start ...


3

It depends. If the entire dynamic range of the scene can be captured in a single exposure, then it is redundant. If the entire dynamic range of the scene exceeds the capacity of a single exposure, and you wish to capture that entire dynamic range, then you need to bracket. Be aware that a single 14-bit raw file may contain as much dynamic range information ...


3

All flash memory systems have their physical enclosure and 2 electronic systems - a controller and flash memory to determine reliability. Electronics Electronically there is no discernible difference because the storage side of flash memory (NAND) is the same across all the types (CF, SD, etc.) NAND at the chip level has a serial interface and relies on ...


3

Actually local contrast / edge enhancement can and was done with film. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unsharp_masking#Photographic_unsharp_masking Other processes that could be done with film include: cropping, contrast enhancement, rotation, colour manipulation, selective brightening/darkening, gradient filters, image compositing, dust/spec removal / ...


3

First, it's not a issue of detail or sharpness, but one of signal to noise ratio. Second, instead of asking, why haven't you done the obvious thing and just tried it!? Let's say you ultimately want a post-processed image with 8 bit per color resolution. In theory, that means any additional bits your camera converts color values to represent extra dynamic ...


2

This is how lossless editing works. This is a BIG concept. Lossless edits never change the original data, edit versions merely store the list of edit operations we specify. If we subsequently edit the data more times later, we never change the original data, we merely edit the list of changes. Then we "output" the change by writing a new JPG file copy, ...


2

Use dcraw with the -D option to extract just the non-interpolated pixel data from each file. This will result in a .pgm file — a grayscale map — which you can then compare (using them cmp command in Linux for bytewise compare, or by making a checksum, or whatever else). I think this should be exactly what you want, since all metadata is discarded, and the ...


2

It depends on the camera. Cameras with more dynamic range will give you greater exposure latitude. With standard professional grade DSLRs you get 8-10 stops of latitude. With some cinematic cameras such as the Sony A7S you may be able to get 12 stops. As far as gathering detail from the shadows, a Canon 5D can get 2 maybe 3 stops out of the shadows. In the ...


2

On the other hand I doubt advanced functions like noise reduction, local contrast or edges could be obtained through traditional film photography — and it seems quite easy to fell on the "too much" side of photo editing. There is no doubt that digital files allow much more processing flexibility than traditional silver halide film. But in this ...


2

One big one you can do digitally that was very hard to do with film is color correction at more than one place along the dark/light range. Unless you were doing very complicated, time consuming, and difficult masking, you could only color correct a photographically processed (as apposed to digitally processed) image at one color point. Color enlargers had ...


1

There is no such thing as a natural photo. Whether intentional or not, every photo is an interpretation of reality. Cameras don't see the same way our eyes/brains do. I don't think I've ever seen a photograph that was "plausible as a real life eye view." I'm always aware I am viewing a photograph rather than the actual scene. What is included and what is ...


1

I think the natural answer is that if the goal is "natural", then avoid the Vivid and Landscape colors.


1

Even though the light pollution is much worse near the horizon, being only a few miles from a major population center the size of St. Louis means there is still a significant amount of light pollution much higher in the sky. You really need a much darker sky to pull a lot of the dimmer elements of the Milky Way out of the background light level. As far as ...


1

I grabbed the NEX-3 RAW sample from here, made a copy of it, and ran md5sum on both: same checksum. I then used exiftool to add a Subject tag to the test copy: exiftool -subject="testing 123" test_copy.ARW and did the checksum again, different this time. I then ran exiftool -all= *.ARW to remove all tags, and again generated checksums. They once ...


1

One approach would be to compare the images in Photoshop: Load both images into Photoshop, using the same raw conversion settings. Copy and paste one, so you end up with them as two layers on the same document. You can then flick between the two by toggling the top layer's visibility to pick up any significant differences. Change the blend mode on the top ...


1

RAW images do not contain all information that could be retrieved from a scene. They simply contain more information than JPEG images. When a photographer chooses to bracket photographs and combine them later, it is usually because the bright and dark areas of their scene are sufficiently different that the camera is not capable of detecting the differences ...


1

There is a solution provided by Jeffrey Friedl and his awesome Lightroom plugin "Data Explorer". download and install the plugin select all the images, which have different canon styles applied, you want to process. the free version of the plugin is limited to handling a maximum of 500 images at once. Edit > Select all run the data explorer. File > Plug-in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible