Red and Blue

by Gordon

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5

First - do you have a specific problem? The time to dump an image to the memory card varies a lot from camera to camera and the best solution for your problem is probably to try to investigate it yourself. Also why are you focusing on the time it takes dump the file to the memory card? With the often large buffers of modern cameras you can often continue to ...


3

As far as I know Lightroom shows the JPG preview which is stored in the RAW file when you first view a picture. This preview is created in camera based on the current settings and is used for things like the histogram in-camera as well as reviewing pictures in-camera.(This is the higher contrast, vibrant picture) After Lightroom has applied its default ...


2

If you open a file, and save it as a different file type, you have now a second file. The original dng file is still where it was when you opened it, and you can reprocess it as often as you want, just like a negative doesn't self destruct when you make a print from it. The other confusion you seem to have is regarding megapixels and megabyte. The number of ...


2

All that information and more is already saved in the EXIF data attached to each image. Any good photo editor will show it to you.


2

RAW Therapee and darktable are very capable programs for developing RAWs. Both of them can handle recent RAF files and are native in Linux. XnView MP is a decent viewer for viewing them under Linux. FujiFilm RAW file converter works using Wine with some GUI problems.


2

RAW data linearly scaled down to 8-bits would result in a very flat, dull image lacking good contrast. For this reason RAW converters apply an S-curve to give much greater contrast in the mid-tones (unless you specifically ask for something else). Depending on where the end points and shoulders of the curve are placed you move the area which gets maximum ...


2

Use Adobe's free (and up-to-date version) DNG converter. It will import your raw files, and being a current version, knows about that camera. It writes DNG files which include necessary profile information directly in the file, so older versions of Adobe products can open them just fine.


1

Using a pirated software is indeed the wrong way (for various reasons) and she should solve this as soon as possible. However if there's a need for a fast solution until she upgrades, she might use e.g. RAW Thereapee (available for Windows, MAC and Linux; Nikon d-180 is supported in current version) to process RAWs into uncompressed/lossless compressed HDR ...


1

JPEG are almost always faster. The bottleneck is the bus to the memory card, if not the memory card. A faster memory card only shifts the bottleneck from the card to the bus but that will be your limit in terms of speed. This is because JPEG files are smaller by at least 50% and sometimes much more if you enable on of the lower-quality settings which ...


1

Many image processing programs do what's called nondestructive editing, where the original file is treated as you would a film negative and left untouched. Realistically, there's not a whole lot of reason to store the finished image in raw format because it's not a format that's often consumed by anything looking for a finished product. In some cases you ...


1

Editing in RAW (using software which creates sidecar (XMP) files) modifies the XMP file. If you then open in Photoshop, those edits are only stored in the PSD file. The original RAW edits are still untouched in the XMP file. Think of it as the RAW file itself not being changed at all, but your raw edits being saved in the XMP file, and applied by the ...


1

As far as I understand your question, it seems to me that the document mode from the interpolation options should solve your problem, see man dcraw: -d Show the raw data as a grayscale image with no interpolation. Good for photographing black-and-white documents. -D Same as -d, but with the original unscaled pixel values. -E Same as -D, ...


1

The EOS 5d mkII generates 5616x3744 JPEGs, while its sensor actually has 5634x3753 active pixels - hence the difference. So I'd suspect the difference must be in the workflow. In case of landscape photos, you're viewing EXIF information originating from camera (perhaps the preview JPEG in RAW); portrait photos have to be rotated and/or demosaiced by your ...


1

I'm not writing 12 separate procedures (DL-install/use x GUI/CLI x OSX/Windows/Linux). That's not a reasonable request for an SE question. I will cover using a Windows GUI. Personally, I am on OSX, and I use the Lightroom plugin for cr2hdr. The utility you want to run the files through is cr2hdr. Links to the source code, and all the different GUI and CLI ...


1

The OP is pretty much all correct, except that gamma makes the dark tones brighter, not dimmer. This exists just in the file, not in the eye. The data is always decoded back to original linear BEFORE any eye sees it. Any difference in the eye seeing the original scene, and seeing the reproduced decoded data, is simply an undesired reproduction error. ...


1

I had a similar problem. But in my case, my files got deleted by ViewNx and had to recover data with some recovery software, specifically EASEUS Recovery. It recovered the files but those files were corrupted. No image viewer could recognize those files and View Nx showed error "unsupported File". I inspected the files with a hex viewer and found the data ...



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