Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

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71

I once made a picture which I believe displays rain quite well. I think the main reason why it works is the backlight coming from the car lights. There are two parts of the image where the rain is very visible. One of them is the area directly in front of the car, where the backlight makes the rain shine and the background is almost black. Another area is ...


40

Photographing rain is very hard because: Rain is fast Rain is small So usually you can do several things: Use flash to "freeze" the rain (or use very high shutter speed if light is permitting) Narrow your angle (zoom) Some examples: http://digital-photography-school.com/forum/how-i-took/107734-rain-flash.html and ...


19

Unfortunately, very few camera models specify the amount of resistance as anything measurable. Water and dust resistance, as specified by Canon, means very little. If it said waterproof and dustproof that would be a stronger statement. I also feel lawyers got involved somewhere in the writing of these things. For example, some Nikon manuals say 'resistant ...


17

Here are my tips: try to choose the angle so that the raindrops reflect as much light as possible try to frame so that the lighter drops are separated from darker background try to get perspective into the picture (so that there are objects at different distances which will render the lighter the longer the distance to the object) try different (fairly ...


16

In Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure", he recommends that in order to simulate falling rain, you use a garden sprinkler, and exposure time of 1/60 sec. Shoot your subjects backlit for best results. This video shows how it's done.


9

I think the answer depends on whether you are trying to capture the mood of the rainy scene or the actual raindrops. If the mood, I think your scene above has some good possibilities, but you need to zoom in. I think there are many possibilities among those buildings and trees. A tripod will help as you could compose the right framing and then wait until ...


8

Background can be anything, for example just trees - but the lighting is important. If it lights up the drops (for example from the side), you'll catch them, if not, then they'll stay invisible before the background. That is not so different from snow. In an industrial area I'd try to catch rain under street-lights in dusk/dawn at first - if you get the ...


8

Some have enquired as to the durability of the 7D, and others have even tested it in various weather I was shown how a Nikon D3 can handle mud. The Pentax K5 looks like it could withstand a little punishment. It really depends what you have in mind. How sadistic do you need to be (to your gear and yourself) to get the shot you want.


8

Most cameras are more weatherproof than their manufacturers let on. The problem is that most users expect that "weatherproof" means it'll be ok if left out in a rainstorm like a forgotten toy, which is very much not true. In my experience, any camera will easily survive a light snowstorm or light misting rain while slung over your shoulder or around the ...


8

Basically no. Canon offers varying degrees of weather sealing on their cameras and the 60D has some sealing, but I would not use it in rain, beyond a light mist. They do make bags you can put around your camera and lens if absolutely necessary. You can get an idea of where the 60D is sealed in this review (callout near the bottom) ...


7

Shoot details such as leaves, rocks, plants, etc with rain on them. Shoot skys with the great clouds that thunderstorms usually have. Use the cloudy sky as a giant free diffuser and take soft portrait shots. If you are in an urban setting shoot people running around with umbrellas and through large puddles. Frame the image to remove the sky if it is ...


7

Many options. What you consider looks best is very much a matter of personal preference and experiment will tell you more than straight instructions, but the following may help. In this case - not the only way, in the 1st image note that the depth of field is narrow and centred around the front duck, making it and a band of ?water? sharp. Background ducks ...


7

There are plenty such models with some in every category. The highest resistance to inclement weather are waterproof cameras which are all point-and-shoot model with a sealed non-extending lenses. These can even go underwater between 3 to 12m for a minimum of 60 minutes. Weather-poof cameras are sealed against splashes in any direction but are not ...


6

It's basically, not (weather resistant). I don't believe any Canon Rebel series is weather sealed or resistant to any appreciable degree more than it looks. It may survive a light spray of water or a little beach sand depending on where it goes, how much, and how long, but its simply not sealed against such things. If you're going to be shooting in any ...


6

There is a tutorial for this effect here. It is for PS but you can still achieve the same look in PS. Here are the basic steps below: Add extra canvas to your photo: Image > Canvas Size add some extra here. The amount is not really important as you will crop at the end. Add Black Layer on top, fill with black. Add Noise. Filter > Noise > Add Noise. Use ...


6

I was inspired by your question to try to come up with a reasonable shot of rain myself. And it is hard, as others have noted. For me, I think that a successful rain shot shows not necessarily the rain as it falls from the sky, but when it hits the ground. I think that @che's shot is a great one; here's my attempt: In this case, the reason it works (in ...


6

I photographed some rain in India, but then it was a lot heavier there :). My experience makes me agree more with Johannes and less with Karel. Basically: Using a wide angle lens creates more space between the objects. Since the rain is already sparse this will work against capturing it. I would suggest you user a longer lens to photograph so it ...


5

Photography is not just about the beautiful things in life although many people only thought of shooting good-looking things. You can go shoot things that people don't. I am sure you have seen a photo of a landmark, in perfect weather, blue sky and white cloud. Have you seen the same landmark shot during a thunderstorm? You can shoot it during rain, ...


4

I remember reading somewhere that when they want to show rain in the movies, they actually have someone standing there with a hose pipe spraying water onto the scene, as real rain is far too small to show up on camera. I've no idea if this applies to stills or not, but it does seem to match with your experience. Perhaps you could try the same thing and see ...


4

Use a fast shutter speed. The slower the shutter, the more it will look like fog as the rain will move a large amount and other rain drops will overlap, and you can't differentiate them. A flash as a major light source will act as a very fast shutter. Do that.


4

I can vouch for the Canon 1 series, I've used both the 1Ds mkII and 1D mkIV for extended periods in the driving rain. You need a weather sealed lens, most L series are, you can usually tell by if there's a rubber skirt around the mount. I don't bother with a filter as the lens hoods on the primes I shoot with a really deep and stop water going anywhere near ...


4

It appears to be a cheap plastic rain cover that can be purchased over sites like ebay or amazon. You have to search for the terms camera rain cover. These are cheap ones though they only stop rain to a certain amount. Ebay rain cover optech rain sleeve


3

Flash will help. You may want to play with 1st-curtain vs. 2nd-curtain and some different shutter speeds -- you should be able to get several different "looks" out of the same precipitation.


3

Professional level DSLR cameras many times can be used without issues in the rain. Some of them require a filter to complete the weather sealing of the lens. There isn't necessarily a "kind", just look for "weather sealing" and to what degree it is weather sealed. Note, you would want a lens and a DSLR body that is weather sealed, not just one or the other. ...


2

A good place to start: http://www.pxleyes.com/tutorials/photoshop/category/rain/


2

Shoot up at buildings, landmarks, people using the cloudy sky as a dramatic background. For subjects that are near enough, a touch of flash can make the sky darker and more dramatic. (i.e. it makes the subject brighter, you expose for the subject, so the sky is darker in the final image).


2

The Rebel series might not be weather as rfusca commented but it is not worth the risk in finding out. I have recently purchased 600D and do not intend to take it out in the rain etc to prove the weather resistance. Previously, I owned a 350D which still worked fine after it had a dip in the sea (I went in first), the 600D will have better resistance and ...


2

I decided to just go out and test my Rebel in the cold. No rain or snow: just the cold. I spent an hour shooting at minus 15 Celsius with no other problems besides numb fingers. I'll let you know how it goes when I'll try it at minus 40!


2

I have used a Canon 600d under heavy snow and it gets wet but it not damaged; by the way I used a 18-200 EF-S zoom lens.


2

I'd go for a LensCoat RainCoat: http://www.lenscoat.com/raincoat-c-34.html It has a velcro bottom closure for tripod and access to the zoom. Slip your hand up there, and you'd be all set.



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