Moonlight

by Jakub

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0

Usually a polarizing filter on the lens is enough, and if it is not, you can apply Krylon Dulling Spray http://www.krylon.com/products/dulling-spray/ http://www.amazon.com/Krylon-K1310-11-Ounce-Dulling-Spray/dp/B00009R8O6 or something similar. The spray is easily removed after. Important limitation is that dulling sprays can't be applied if humidity is ...


0

I applied a radial gradient to the quick-mask in Gimp like this: ...then adjusted the black point in levels: ...with this result: There is still inconsistency, as you described, but I can't tell if it's from lighting, or discoloration on the actual plate. You could probably do better if you took the time to create a custom gradient that closely ...


1

Select the object (product) so you can adjust background and object separately. It may be possible to do everything with lights, but the simple solution is to select the product using Photoshop (or whatever tool you use). Then the background can go to all white and the product can be adjusted properly. This will eliminate or at least lessen the flaring ...


1

Like null said, you don't want a tripod. In a studio environment it's just in the way too much. What you want is a camera stand. A camera stand has a small base with wheels to move it easily and a vertical pole that a platform and/or arm hangs off of to which you can mount your camera. Takes up little space, is very maneuverable in the tight spaces of a ...


2

I don't think that you want to use a tripod at all. For easier work, you want to place the product on some kind of table. Adjusting a tripod to point the camera on something on the table can be hard. Even if the middle column of the arm can act as a boom and be adjusted at an angle. A tripod provides a sturdy base at the cost of the space for three legs, ...


0

Alright, I'm answering this on my own as I figured it out and the answers available aren't exactly spot on. Opaque glass is the way to go. The reason for that, is that clear plexiglass will simply allow the light to pass through completely, without "spreading it out" to create the light surface I was seeking. Opaque plexiglass on the other hand, a.k.a the ...


0

I'm confused about some things on your question, but I'll answer the options I understand. Plexiglass as a background Don't use a reflective glossy white background. Acording to the laws of phisics regarding the conservation of energy, if you have a glossy material some of the light will bounce in an angle oposite of the light. This means less light on the ...


3

The key to getting that look isn't really about what materials you use at all. It is about making sure there is enough light on the background to completely blow it out while keeping the light on the product 2-3 stops lower so you don't blow out the details of the product as well. This has been covered quite well in other questions. Please see: Why ...


-1

I cannot find a definitive answer on whether I need clear plexiglass or opaque (milky) for better lighting. but you have an answer right there: horizon-less photographic paper on top of that If you add paper on top of it anyway, I don't think it really matters what kind of plexiglas you use. You best bet would be to buy clear plexiglas and some ...


1

You are right. A shorter focal-length has more depth of field but this will get reduced by having to stand closer. Unless you crop, the depth-of-field for equal framing will remain almost the same. I made exact calculations when shopping for a macro lens this fell within 0.1% difference. You are left with closing down the aperture. F/8 is sharp and very ...


-1

I see few solutions: Make focal length shorter. When it is shorter DoF is bigger Close apperture. I know usually at f8 the sharpnes is best, but... Invest in tilt-shift lens and tilt it for maximum DoF


4

The blue shadow is from light going through the blue-tinted transparent cover. Here are some suggestions: Put a secondary fill light where it can illuminate the background. You might position it behind the background, if that is translucent. Mount the objects on some type of hidden stand, such as one going through the backdrop, so that shadows fall ...


0

Instead of eliminating the shadows via lighting, why not try to suspend the shoe via two thin metal rods? You then take a picture of a shoe that is in mid air and there won't be any shadows near the shoe.



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