Butterfly

by Rodrigo

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Consider getting that YN-560 off-camera, Strobist-style, and onto a stand with an umbrella as your diffuser (any smaller diffuser may not be as soft as you'd like). Bouncing loses you a stop or two of light, and you need everything you can get. You'd need a stand, swivel, and umbrella, and some way to trigger the flash, but the YN-560 has built-in optical ...


0

By taking take multiple pictures under different lighting conditions and also with the clothing removed so that you have a picture of only the background (with the same focus and exposure), you have a lot of data for post processing available. This allows you to compose an ideal picture of the clothing with some ideal background that may be impossible to ...


1

Flash Yongnuo YN560 - Tripod... ... Then we have some lights from the top that I directed to the background Your picture shows orange tint in some places. I suspect that the flash and the other lights have different color temperature. If that's the case, you should get some gel filters (e.g. from Rosco) to get the temperature of the flash to the ...


1

Probably the best investment you could make at this point would be a decent tripod and adjustable head. Anytime possible and convenient, a picture should be taken with a tripod. Your initial picture appears to have a tan tint to it, and the tan color shows up on the pants as well. Its tough to tell if it truly is that color, but my guess is it is not. ...


2

Lens selection is largely irrelevant for this task since the end result will be fairly low-resolution, any mid length fixed (prime) or zoom lens should be fine so long as it gets everything in. Certainly both the proposed lenses will be good enough. In this situation just about every other factor apart from the body & lens is actually what's important ...


1

The obvious problem with your sample photo is that it's blurry. There are several factors that can contribute to the problem, including: camera movement subject movement out of focus poor optics sensor noise shallow depth of field When you're taking a photo with low light, you'll generally be working with a large aperture, which means shallow depth of ...


0

Thanks for your answers. I managed to get a hold of a tripod today, and it seems to have worked great. I'm getting a much clearer picture now on all my photos. I have included another picture to show the difference.


0

As has been mentioned in the comments to the question, this question isn't really appropriate for Stack Exchange, however I will still provide an answer, but to the question: How do I improve the quality of lowlight photographs with a point and shoot camera? Tripod The first and probably most obvious solution for your situation is to use a tripod. Looking ...



Top 50 recent answers are included