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52

Generating High Quality Ink Jet Prints Making effective use of professional photographic ink jet printers is tricky business, especially when the statistics that are commonly used to describe these printers are vague and misleading. Learning how a ink jet printers function, how to properly interpret their capabilities, and make the most effective use of ...


28

There are some general rules you can use to determine the "maximum" (I use that term loosely) print size. Keep in mind that the quality of a print is often more dependent on what is being printed than its size in megapixels, and even if your image size is not dense enough to mathematically fit onto a certain page size, you can still blow most images up ...


23

When it comes down to quality, outside of the general consumer ink jet printers which are generally not recommended for quality photo printing at home, the difference between a commercial wide-format printer in a lab and a professional wide-format printer for home use is minimal. At worst, the overall quality between a lab print and a print from a Canon ...


22

Color Management is a scientific process by which various devices used in an image processing workflow can be used despite differences in their supported color. Every device is only approximating some of the total range of colors humans can see, and this limited range is called its "color gamut". Each device has limitations, but those limitations differ from ...


19

Emprical Study: Extreme digital upscaling For all of the theory above, thats all it currently is...theory. It is the end result of days of research on the physical characteristics of printers, the theory behind printing and ink, the concepts of DPI and PPI, etc. The real question is, how does it stack up against empirical evidence? Does it withstand the ...


19

You're close on what 1:1 means but slightly off. A 1:1 macro lens means that the size of the subject is projected onto the sensor (or film) at the exact same size it is in real life. You can blow up the print as large as you like :) The ability to go to 1:1 is just a metric and there are a lot of compromises that come with being able to enlarge a subject ...


17

ALERT ALERT rant warning I personally feel that an image hanging on a wall needs to be able to withstand three different viewing distances fairly well (1) too far (i.e. way past ideal--like 5 feet for a 4"x5" print) (2) ideal (3) with a magnifying glass. probably most images will handle 1 and 2 fine. Nearly anything hung in a gallery looks freaking ...


17

Its better to scan the original slide/negative as its better to reproduce from as close to the source as possible meaning quality of reproduction goes down in this order: The source (whatever it was you actually were shooting) The slide/negative or digital camera file A print of the photograph. It essentially comes down to every stage of recording ...


17

In theory you can get more out of a negative than a print. However, in practice you are more likely to have access to a flat bed scanner that can give a wonderful scan from the print. A good film scanner is much more expensive and slower. Considerations are similar for larger format film. But the costs go up even more, since the consumer-level film ...


16

The information above is quite good, so I won't try to compete, but here is a nice infographic: The boxes are the number of megapixels for a print of the size in inches according to the scales on the axes. This is at 300ppi, which is a standard for the print resolution of many images. This great graphic comes from an article at D215.


15

The 1:1 designation means that the image of a subject projected onto the sensor (or film) is the same size on the sensor as real life, and is the minimum magnification to classify as true macro. There are lenses that do magnify more, such as Canon's MP-E 65 which can magnify images between 1 and 5 times their real-world size. The benefit of 1:1 ...


15

Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


14

Generating High Quality Ink Jet Prints: Summary Making effective use of professional photographic ink jet printers is tricky business, especially when the statistics that are commonly used to describe these printers are vague and misleading. Learning how a ink jet printers function, how to properly interpret their capabilities, and make the most effective ...


14

There are technical issues, copyright issues, ethical issues and creative issues to consider. Technical issues 1. The image will need to be scaled up in size. With the right software you can get good surprisingly good results. I printed a 1200 px wide image on A3 with more than acceptable results. 2. It is very dependent on the type of image. An image ...


14

Color laser printers, especially the big high end office printers, have the color capabilities you need for printing the company logo and the occasional Excel pie chart — but they are truly bad for printing photos. But the good news is that almost any of the current generation of ink jet printers, even the cheap ones, are pretty good at printing photos - ...


14

OK... I used to run a print shop so i think i qualify to answer this. Any print shop that can print 36x20 inhouse will be using a large format inkjet printer, id say Epson, HP or Canon. Assuming the printer is reasonably new (IE < 4 years) it will almost definitely use good inks - in Epson's case UltraChrome. IF the print shop uses a constant feed ink ...


13

jrista has the start of the formula, and it covers images viewed at arm's length quite well. But that 'conventional wisdom' devolves into unreasonable numbers as soon as you get to anything "big", say even a 16x20... requiring 5-6000 px. And if you hit poster size, say 30x40... 9000x12000... 108 MPix?! When you're talking about really big prints, it's ...


13

Since asking this question, and answering my own question I've faced the same problem so many times that I decided to write a website that solves it in a nice free way. You just upload a photo and then you can just download a jpeg ready to print at 6"x4". www.oddprints.com Output photo: Sorry if this is a bit spammy, but it is a free website, no need ...


13

When you say stand in the face of time...exactly how long are you talking? Properly stored, a pigment based ink jet print should last some 150-200 years (according to independent high-intensity lab tests anyway) in great condition, without any extra special care or handling. Now, that does require proper storage, which means kept protected from light and ...


13

You bet... two labs that I've specifically used for making custom photo books are: Bay Photo White House Custom Color They both have product lines that include a variety of different configurations (book size, # of pages, paper choice, cover options and materials, etc.), quantity of books ordered (1 or 2 is a common request), and will use 4-color or ...


13

I am a believer in presenting art in the size and aspect ratio that best compliments it. I know that we are a world of standards, and there are some very common and readily available aspect ratios such as 3:2, 4:3, 4:5, 1:1. While a standard set of well-established formats makes it easy to produce printers and papers that meet the average persons needs in a ...


12

In theory, one could make great third-party inks, but in practicality, I don't think any of them trade on permanence or color quality. They trade on cheapness. I have a friend who ran out of brand-name ink in a pinch on a project and ended up printing some of it with refills; at first, one had to know in order to tell which was which, but after a week, ...


12

A common recommendation for printing is 300 ppi, so approximately 17x10 in. (16x9 is probably easier to find) For a poster or canvas you can often go a little lower, into the 200-250 ppi range without too much difference in quality. If you dropped all the way down to 160 ppi, then you could do a 32 x 18 in. print. The best path, however, is to ask your ...


12

These two formats are different: JPEG general info JPEG is used to store images on smaller disk space JPEG compression algorithm changes image data while converting it. Amount of change can be controlled but not its location which is always around sharp colour changes JPEG is primarily an RGB format If you'd be saving and opening the same image several ...


11

Resolution does matter, and what is required will depend on the size of the canvas. Typically, canvas printing services offer guidelines for minimum resolution. Some other considerations: Glossy vs matte. Not all services offer both. For the ones that don't, be sure to find out which they use. Border type. Black, white, and gallery borders are commonly ...


11

The advantages of having your own printer are: You don't wait for prints Your cost per copy can be lower (the more you print, the quicker your average print cost decreases). You don't pay for shipping Directly control the results Labs on the other hand: More printing options (canvas, wide-prints, extra large prints etc). Cost to Quality Ratio is higher ...


10

I highly recommend Mpix. They produce great quality prints at very reasonable prices, and have a variety of products available


10

Emprical Study: Does PPI Really Matter? For all of the theory above, thats all it currently is...theory. It is the end result of days of research on the physical characteristics of printers, the theory behind printing and ink, the concepts of DPI and PPI, etc. The real question is, how does it stack up against empirical evidence? Does it withstand the test ...



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