Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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2

Do the math. Your photo is currently 18 inches wide and 300 DPI. You want to enlarge it to 16 feet = 192 inches. That's a factor of 192 / 18 = 11. That means the original 300 DPI will be 28 DPI. Pixels will be 1/28 inch wide, or 0.9 mm. Now you have to decide whether that's good enough. To decide that, print out something at 28 DPI and see how far ...


0

I use HP deskjet 9800 that has quadrichrome photographic inks kit, it is a professional office printer but is versatile and does really good photo prints even in A3 paper size.


-2

You can certainly get reasonably results with an inkjet printer, but the price per. picture is quite high and the quality of pictures bad - for my liking - when using an ordinary inkjet printer! On a daily basis I work with flexleasing, and we must use the images immediately. We use a mini photo printer, it uses photo sheets as a polarid photo. It delivers ...


2

There are many good inkjet printers that will produce good results. I think this site would like questions that are slightly longer lived than a specific recommendation of a brand or model number, and I see related topics on the right that will probably answer your question better, like this one: What should I look for in a printer for photos? All that said,...


0

I did darkroom photography for 25 years and I like the digital black and white prints that I produce today with Epson K3 better than anything I ever produced in the darkroom. Dmax and the overall perception depend on the paper. Have your lab to print some samples on Canson papers. Glossier papers will give richer blacks, if this is what you want. some matte ...


3

Ok. This can get to be a very deep topic. But before I tell you what I do, there is a yahoo group called digitalblackandwhitetheprint@yahoogroups.com that you should join, and you also should read a fellow named Paul Roark's website, specifically the page http://www.paulroark.com/BW-Info/. What I do is fairly simple, but the results I get are quite good. I ...


0

If you are using your home printer for example or an ink jet based system, leave your files as RGB all the way. Manual CMYK conversion is specific for comercial printing, where the plates respond exactly as you define the values on the CMYK file; but almost all inkjet and laser printers make their own internal calculations-conversions. If you send a CMYK ...


3

If you had sheets of Rubylith masking film by ULANOâ„¢ you could lay a sheet over any device for a darkroom safe-light filter. If you peel off the strip-able layer, and it will cling right to the phone or pad screen as a Mylar layer does without any glue or moisture. It is perfectly transparent and you can see the tiniest details through the red layer. It's ...


0

There's a product idea here, but it's not just an app. You need to produce screen protectors that are also safelight filters, so that people can safely use any app in the darkroom. A companion app with timers, calculators, chemistry data, etc., would complete the package.


3

Typical phone screens have too broad a spectrum to use as safelights (there's too much orange in the red channel). The red safelight spectrum here indicates that there's no light below 600nm. You'll get too much leakage below that from any LCD. With OLED you might be OK I've seen spectra that indicate that you would, and that you wouldn't (e.g. here, though ...


0

Most printers have a list of accepted filetypes, so I would check with them before choosing what to save your photos as. It depends what kind of paper you are printing on and how big the print is. For example, if you print on glossy photo paper, the standard is a bare minimum of 200dpi. If you print on newspaper, it's closer to 70dpi (the paper would just ...


-1

I believe the native resolution of that printer is 360. Since this is higher than what you can provide for the aforementioned print size, just send them the full resolution file. Your photo editor should calculate the actual ppi based on the target size. Avoid lossy compression (JPEG).


1

To get the maximum quality you would usually send the native resolution. This will rarely be a nice and round number. This is because a printer can discard extra but it cannot make up for missing details. It also avoids double resampling since a printer has to convert to its inner resolution and resolution. Say your 80 MP is 10328 x 7760 pixels, then a 36 x ...



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