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by Jorge Córdoba

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23

When it comes down to quality, outside of the general consumer ink jet printers which are generally not recommended for quality photo printing at home, the difference between a commercial wide-format printer in a lab and a professional wide-format printer for home use is minimal. At worst, the overall quality between a lab print and a print from a Canon ...


14

Color laser printers, especially the big high end office printers, have the color capabilities you need for printing the company logo and the occasional Excel pie chart — but they are truly bad for printing photos. But the good news is that almost any of the current generation of ink jet printers, even the cheap ones, are pretty good at printing photos - ...


11

I've given up on making prints at home. I've had various inkjet photo printers over the years, from Canon to Epson to HP. I've never had the high-end models, but I've had some from mid-range on down. And, I got good results from the mid-range ones, and it's true that they offer more flexibility, but the constant problem I had was not printing enough. This ...


11

The advantages of having your own printer are: You don't wait for prints Your cost per copy can be lower (the more you print, the quicker your average print cost decreases). You don't pay for shipping Directly control the results Labs on the other hand: More printing options (canvas, wide-prints, extra large prints etc). Cost to Quality Ratio is higher ...


10

Printing a picture seems like it should be easy but there is a lot more involved when it comes to getting predictable colors from what you see on the screen to the print. The first step is calibrating your monitor. This ensures that your monitor is displaying colors correctly. You can purchase a calibrator from companies such as Colorvision (Spyder series) ...


9

The Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II lens is NOT a macro lens.


6

For your purpose, you do not actually want a macro for its macro capabilities, but because it has very minimal distortion and a very flat field of focus. The 60mm macro qualifies, as does the 50mm f/2.5 "Compact Macro", but not necessarily the 50mm f/1.8. The 50 2.5 CM's lack of true-macro 1:1 magnification is not relevant in your case but its good ...


5

I have a Epson R2400 I bought off Ebay for $100. It can produce excellent prints but is very tempermental & can go though a ton of ink ($130 for a whole set of inks which get used up really quickly). I've had two head cleanings in the last 8 months at about $80 a pop & the printer still will occasionally have banding issues (this is where you can see ...


5

For your stated budget-- $100-$200-- I'd stick with going to a place like Costco, Walgreens, etc. They will make your prints with 'reasonable defaults', meaning that the colors will be predictably saturated, but they won't give you prints with border problems, with the colors wildly off (green skin tones, etc, unless you took a picture of The Hulk), and ...


5

Actually, in theory, no. Calibration of the two devices is independent. If you calibrate just the printer, perfectly-adjusted images may look wrong on the monitor but will print just fine. You could use images corrected by someone else somewhere (which you download), or you could calibrate "by wire", just looking at histograms and numeric values rather than ...


5

I have seen this before when printing on the wrong side of the paper. Photo paper has a specific side that it needs to be printed on to keep the ink from spreading as only one side is usually prepared for printing. It is possible, however, to get double-sided photo paper. If you are using matte paper, the whiter side will usually be the printing side, and ...


4

Being a photo printer owner for many years I now get everything printed at a lab. The inconvenience of having to send off is more than offset by the quality and versatility offered. Not having to deal with ink cartridges, different types of photo paper, cropping etc. is worth the small additional cost. There's not a lot to chose between the major online ...


4

It's not macro because the best magnification is 1:2. So items that are 1 inch in size, take up 1/2 an inch on the file (sensor). By definition, macro starts at 1:1 magnification. Most people get confused because many point and shoots have a "macro" feature, which actually only allows a closer focusing, but not actual true macro magnification. THe EF-S ...


4

Quite frankly, I've never found an ink-based printer I liked. I've used printers from a 3-color cartridge to 8 individual wells using anything from cheap 20 lb. to high gloss photo paper, and none of them work well enough for me. Add to that the cost of ink, paper, maintenance to the print heads and other parts, and I just don't see the reason to own your ...


4

Actually I would be very surprised if they looked the same without a lot of work! If you think about it, monitors and printers use completely different technologies and ways of representing colors: Virtually all LCD, OLED or CRT displays create colors by mixing 3 primary additive colors which are Red, Green and Blue. Each pixel is make of those a mix of ...


3

Both Epson and Canon make very well respected photo printers. The Epson R printers and the Canon Pro printers make extremely good quality photos that will last many many years, and are suitable for sales. But, they can be pricey. Lower level models in the Epson and Canon line make serviceable prints, especially if you purchase one that has several ink ...


3

The Canon 50mm Macro is the EF 50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro, which only does true 1:1 macro with an extension tube. I think that people were agreeing that it would be good to photograph artwork, but not for use as a macro lens...


3

A good tutorial on making digital negatives using The Gimp. A free image editing software platform. http://www.alternativephotography.com/wp/negatives/digital-negatives-gimp You can make them on your computer and then print using any printer you have. Not sure why you mention your printer? Maybe some printers have this option built in?


3

When printing with a custom ICC profile, you need to make sure that you disable color correction in the printer driver. By default, the printer performs color correction on its own, and Canon printers tend to oversaturate prints. If you print from Photoshop or Lightroom, make certain that before you actually print, you configure the printer driver correctly ...


3

No, Inkjet printers do not use steganography, but a good deal of Laser do, but not all. As en example, I had a run of brochures done a few months ago by a print company that use a Xerox DocuColour 800 laser based machine, and you could clearly make out the yellow dots in the right light. (also my office Dell 1320c, which is a Xerox system does it) I then ...


3

You're printing on the wrong side of the paper... High quality photo printer paper is usually single sided (unless specifically labeled otherwise). The two sides will often be visibly different and the 'wrong' side will often be marked with a manufacturer's watermark. The 'right' side has a coating that is highly absorbent in order to pull the ink into the ...


3

This printer is not $300 or less considering the original price tag, but it comes with a $200 rebate, and up to $300 rebate when buying photo paper. And since you are trying to find a deal I think this could be appropriate as an answer. Canon PIXMA PRO 100 printer @ Adorama for $389 with a mail in rebate of up to $300 depending on what else you buy. Pixma ...


3

I'd recommend either the PIXMA Pro 100 that DavyCrockett mentioned or if you want something cheaper and don't mind being limited to 4x6, one of the Canon Selphy die-sub printers will give really nice quality and a fixed cost per print of around 25 cents. For the cost, the Selphy is the best bang for your buck, though if you use good papers, the Pixma will ...


2

In my experience, Epson's profiles are quite accurate, and the results quite repeatable. Canon printers seem to me to place a greater emphasis on speed than quality. Edit: Canon only claims coverage of 90% of Pantone for Lucia EX inks. Epson Ultrachrome HDR covers 98% of Pantone (and not just "claims" but "is certified by Pantone.") Attempting to claim ...


2

This is a difficult question to answer, as it is fairly subjective. Both Epson and Canon printers are excellent, and provide astonishing quality. I'll try to avoid the culture war here, so here are some basic statistics and important points about printers that meet your needs: One of the first things you need to decide is how valuable quality is to you: ...



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