Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

IS greatly improves video. Being able to shoot video in low light with the sharpness that a prime gives would be great. The 24mm, 28mm and 35mm primes with IS have been very popular. A 50mm f/1.4 or f/1.8 with IS would be a big hit.


2

It's an old question ( EG http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2714173 ). The short answer is that it is most advantageous for Video, because when you zoom in everything doesn't get darker. For single frame Photos you can adjust ISO and Shutter speed (the automatic Setting will do it for you) on a shot by shot basis and get all Photos similar; in a Video ...


-1

Get the kit lens! Some background: I have a Sony NEX-3N. I put a lot of miles on the kit lens, I've taken it everywhere. It's very portable. We've been through a lot of mud together. I take risky shots I simply wouldn't with a more expensive lens. And you know what? I have taken some great pictures. I can get the droplets in a splash of water on a lake in ...


5

Question asks for opinions, but the answer can be subjective and still be on spot. The first thing to consider when taking photos is your skill, not the camera. And unless it comes to professionals or experts, the kit lens is the first thing that 90% of users will come in contact with (and often the only one); do you really think that Sony couples its ...


4

It’s very subjective, if the kit lens is good or not. Most people can't tell the difference between a photos taken with a high quality lens and a fair one, only the really bad lenses stands out for the non photographer. Also using primes vs. zooms is very much based on price/quality vs flexibility. Some will choose primes based on low price, very high ...


13

I am on the edge of investing in the Sony a6000 ... Ok, fallacy #1. :) You never invest in a camera unless you're a pro and can write it off on your taxes. Cameras depreciate. Even while new. Your "investment" will never give you any monetary returns. This is an expense, pure and simple. (If anybody has other suggestions in that price range - I ...


3

Generally speaking, kit lenses are "good enough" to get you started taking decent pictures, but not good enough for technically outstanding picture quality in anything but absolutely ideal conditions (and often not even then). That said, keep in mind that when people derate kit lenses, it is often in comparison to high-end lenses. Because they are made to ...


-2

The kit lens is designed to be versatile and very cheap which is exactly what it gives you. For very little money you get a wide to normal reach with rather poor image quality, so you can take souvenir photos but they will not be of quality. A prime lens will restrict you to one focal-length but will not only produce higher-quality results, it gives you ...


5

Don't be fooled by what others say about the kit lens. Sony has a reputation to live up too. The kit lens specifications has been chosen to provide a good entry level lens. Your best choice is to start with the kit lens and then build your inventory of lenses after you learn how to use your new camera.


0

While not exhaustive, these are the terms for lens types I've run into: Prime vs. Zoom A prime lens is a lens with a fixed focal length. A zoom lens is a lens with a variable focal length. Simple as that. Wide, Normal, Telephoto These designations are about the focal length that the lens has: short, medium, and long, respectively. In full-frame ...


-1

First we need to define “normal” as to focal length. This is because wide-angle and telephoto are referenced from this value. All cameras can be fitted with a “normal” lens. Such a lash-up delivers an angle of view of about 45⁰. We are talking about a camera that yields a rectangular image. The 45⁰ angle of view results when the camera is held horizontal ...


2

Think of those as qualifiers, not types because they are not mutually exclusive: Relative to viewing-angle, lens can be called: Ultra-Wide, Wide-Angle, Normal, Telephoto, Super-Telephoto. These terms are not absolute either in that a lens can be wide-angle when mounted on one camera and normal or ultra-wide on another, depending if the sensor is relatively ...


2

We all see things differently. People who complain online are likely to outweigh the people who write to tell you how happy they are. In that case, just be aware that complaints are far more frequent and can distort the real picture significantly. 'Walk around' is a term that suggests you want a lens that you would prefer to keep attached to your camera ...


4

None of these lenses are going to approach L series lenses in terms of build quality and the ability to take punishment and just keep working as they should. There are reasons they offer near the same optical quality at 1/5 to 1/15 the price of an "L" prime lens. I've had an EF 50mm f/1.8 II "nifty fifty" since 1997 or so and it still works fine for what it ...


2

If you are considering a Canon 50mm lens, you should really consider the new EF 50mm 1.8 STM as it is much much better than the old plastic mount EF 50mm 1.8 II. The new STM version has much more accurate STM AF along with a metal mount, closer min focus distance, 7 blade aperture, better focus ring, and new coatings which improve the optics. It is so ...


2

You seem to have some confusion about the different lens designations. The "nifty 50" is the EF 50mm f/1.8. I don't think Canon offers a 50mm f/2.8. generally build quality is very important to me so the 50mm f2.8 "nifty 50" is out. Then step up to the EF 50mm f/1.4 USM. At $350, it costs more than the f/1.8 that I think you're referring to above but ...


2

Well the 40mm is a better focal length for walk around in my opinion, however if you are into portrait then the 50mm is certainly more flattering and it's a tad bit sharper and faster.



Top 50 recent answers are included