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by VonSchnauzer

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126

Firstly I wouldn't let the recommended retail price dissuade you — the 10-22 can be snapped up for £570 online. To answer the second part of your question: how can I get the shots I want without having to pay such a large amount of money? I would look at the non-Canon brand wideangles, such as the Tamron 10-22 f/3.4-4.5 for £337 or the Sigma 10-20 ...


31

Actually it's more than just the aperature. The First lens on your list also has built in Image Stabilization, which will allow you to hand-hold your lens at near 2-3 stops 4 STOPS!! lower than what is possible without IS. One handy rule for shutter speed is that is should be 1/(Focal length), so at the maximum reach, 200mm, you would need a shutter speed ...


23

Leica is a luxury brand with much smaller production runs than the big players in the camera industry. Low volumes lead to high prices, especially since research and development costs have to be covered. In addition, there's more manual labor involved in manufacturing Leica cameras and lenses. This labor is German, which means higher wages and thus higher ...


22

I don't agree that pricing should only offset your costs. Photography was a hobby before you started making money with it, so the cost of your equipment isn't exactly an expense of your photography business. Instead, I think the end product you produce is the only factor in pricing. There is no reason for a client to have to pay for your expensive DSLR if ...


21

NOTE: To some extent my answer is 'US-centric' being as I've never had to price my photography in another country. If you're not in the US, your mileage may vary. Never, ever base your price on what other photographers in your area are charging. You have no way of knowing what their expenses are, and thus you have no way of knowing what their profit margin ...


20

I'm not even going to try to compete with Matt's awesome answer for why they're more expensive. But there's a second part of your question that no one seems to have covered: how to get into wide angle photography without the huge up front expense. Here's a wide angle image I made using a fairly normal zoom lens, several exposures and a piece of software ...


18

For commercial use, you have to pay. Period. Maybe not much. If it's for commercial use, the "too poor to pay" line is fiction.


17

As somebody who is interested in photography as a hobby -- not a profession, and therefore not worried about making income from it -- I first consider who is asking. I've had a few requests from groups I am happy to support: mostly local parks and local wildlife preserves. I know they have a small budget but as I frequent them (often for free) and get lots ...


15

The basic answer is that Canon's 50mm f/1.8 is an exception even within Canon's lineup. It's an old, simple design with nothing fancy, and made to be mass-produced cheaply. Compare the Canon 85mm f/1.8, at AU$360. Basically, almost no lenses are as cheap as the one you're using as your reference point, so your perception is skewed. The Olympus lenses aren't ...


14

The key to setting your pricing is to figure out your costs, that way you can make an informed decision: You need to not only consider the printing costs, but also all the other fixed costs: As an example: Costs per 3 years: Camera - $500 Lenses - $1000 Accessories - $250 Software - $250 Total: $2000 Annual Costs: image hosting: $100 website: $50 ...


14

Pricing is all about the market; if the show is going to be syndicated nationally/internationally/etc. I can't see anything directly relevant in my local friendly price guides, but had this been for TV advertising, then 985 USD would've been the price I'd have suggested. It might be worth asking if they had a budget in mind, and start negotiating between ...


14

This was one of my first questions starting, so I asked a professional: How do you know what to charge? He answered: By asking too much. You can try this but since you are doing this for friends, you may try a different approach: Either a per-day fee (say $500) and give them all that turns out good. Or better, I think, you shoot and give them ...


14

This article on the super-expensive lens you mention, the Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6, has has some details that might put the price into perspective: The new EF 1200 was then marketed by Canon in July, 1993 with an annual production volume of around 2 (that's right - "two") lenses. The EF 1200 L was available by special order with lead times running about 18 ...


14

You absolutely should be paid. And not only that, you absolutely have the right to protect your work. There are dangers associated with offering "free use" of your work, as once you do, you can never really tell how far your work may be distributed "for free". The company you license it to may turn around and license another company to create some design ...


14

When you look closely the only thing that is the same on the feature list is the approximate number of megapixels. The mkIII is an entirely new camera, new type of chassis, new viewfinder, new shutter assembly, new button layouts, new software. Nothing has been recycled, unlike the mkII. the higher FPS shooting, and the dual storage to SD Card are nice ...


14

This is not a silly post in the matter of an amateur that gets asked to work paying gigs. If your work is satisfactory, it is very common to initially have close friends and family consider you for their photography needs. As word of mouth continues, of course even people outside of your immediate contacts will pick up on your skills and engage in business ...


13

The Nikon D700 has a full-frame (FX) sensor. Such sensors are inherently more expensive than APS-C (DX) sensors, due in part to the relatively lower yield from chip manufacturing. In addition, the D700 is a "pro-grade" body, featuring alloy chassis, multiple controls, and AI-lens metering capability. Compared to a D300s for example, which has similar ...


13

All speculation: Bodies go out of date more quickly, so the store will be renting it out for a shorter time period. In order to get an equal return on investment they charge more per rental. Lenses are more reliable (less likely to break) assuming that the renter handles each with care. And perhaps there is more demand for renting lenses.


12

If cost is your biggest concern, the best time to buy a model of camera is when the next one comes out. Then you can purchase the 'old' model at a discount, or even better, buy gently used from those that are desperate for the new model. This requires patience and self-control, which among us camera geeks, can be in short supply as it relates to camera ...


12

When comparing film to digital cameras, you need to compare apples to apples. I searched for the EOS 1, EOS 1Ds and EOS 1DsMk3 and found a surprising fact: the EOS 1, when equipped with the battery and motor drive extender (grip) which brings it to about the same physical size as the EOS 1Ds/1DsMk3, becomes almost the same weight and even heavier! EOS 1: ...


12

Yes, someone could do that. That is called Time for print. "Time for print (also known as trade for print or test for print, TFP and sometimes also print for time or PFT) is a term used in many online photography communities describing an arrangement between a model and a photographer, whereby the photographer agrees to provide the model with an ...


11

Remember, you were concerned about getting great image quality wide-open? There's no such thing as a free lunch. And a cheap lunch may have adequate nutrition without being gourmet. More expensive lenses use exotic elements, and a lot more glass overall. Note that the AF-S Nikkor 35mm f/1.4G weighs three times as much as the AF-S DX Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G, and ...


11

I have a different take on this since I don't derive a living from photography. I do it for fun, personal enjoyment, having the pictures, the challenge, having other people like pictures I show them, etc. What I insist on is being properly credited. I get satisfaction out of knowing other people liked a picture from me enough to publish it, and the ...


11

Some lenses have more glass (bigger aperture requires bigger glass elements). Some lenses have better quality lens elements to combat chromatic aberrations, distortion and vignetting. Some lenses have better build quality (the 50mm f/1.8 has a plastic body and is relatively poorly built). Some lenses are weather sealed (more complex to build). Some lenses ...


11

Wow, are you hosed. You tell them the price before you start. Its too late now. Traditionally, wedding photographers made all their money off prints. If you give them soft copies, you cut yourself out of that profit stream. Bay Area, NYC, Chicago, etc. I wouldn't consider doing a shoot unless I got at least $100 per hour for my time. Plus I'd want more to ...


10

B&H sell a Nikon F6 35mm film camera for $2,449.00, it weighs 975g B&H sell a Nikon D700 full frame DSLR for $2,699.95, it weighs 995g



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