Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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29

DoF preview is difficult to use well. The idea is simple, but application much less so. Without DoF preview, what you see through the viewfinder is shown with the lens "wide open" -- at its largest possible aperture. This provides no guidance about how much depth of field your picture will have, because (unless you happen to be shooting at maximum aperture) ...


15

You're right in your conclusion that Lightroom is initially showing you the embedded jpeg. However, Adobe isn't privy to how the camera manufacturers process their jpegs in-camera, so Lightroom is never going to be able to produce thumbnails/previews/images that match the jpegs SOOC. I'd suggest that the main issue is whether you are happy with your ability ...


9

The command-line utility dcraw can do this, using the dcraw -e flag. However, it apparently has issues with large images in Windows Vista and Windows 7 (see the FAQ on that page). IrfanView displays the embedded JPEG when opening some forms of RAW. If it's able to open your type, you can simply open the RAW and do a "Save as --> JPEG". This forum user ...


6

It actually depends on the camera that you have. You basically have two kinds of "Live Preview", the first using an automatic gain fonction to help you with the framing. It's the most basic one and for this, no matter what exposure setting you choose or modify, the screen will keep showing the same scene. The second type of live preview is called Real time ...


5

Depth of Field preview is supposed to show you exactly that. The depth of field. The easiest way to check, is to not use Live-View, and look through the view finder. If you stop the lens down to f8 or higher, and hit the DoF Preview button; the view finder will get noticeably darker. I'm not 100% certain about live view. In the 40D; DOF did not show in ...


5

I hate to say this, but first make sure you're pressing the right button, as I always press the wrong one. There are two similar buttons. One is the function button near the top of the lens, and the DOF preview button is almost under the lens. If you press the DOF button, even with the aperture wide open, it will make a very clunky sound, like when you ...


4

Unless you have programmed the DOF button to do something else, which you can on most DSLRs, you should see a difference as long as there are objects at different distances in your viewfinder. At the very least, the view has to get darker when stopping down. If it does not, then you DOF button is doing something. If it is, you will see a change in ...


4

Use DCRaw: $ dcraw -e MyFile.NEF You will get a MyFile.thumb.jpg. It should work just the same with Canon files. More on Dcraw: http://www.cybercom.net/~dcoffin/dcraw/dcraw.1.html


4

Don't forget that LR is a non-destructive editor. This means that for all sources, whether RAW or JPEG, LR does not alter the original in any way. It does this partially by building a database of the image itself, so that it renders changes on screen, mimicking how they would look in the final export. LR builds several previews, stored in the preview ...


3

The camera will display the image based on your existing picture control settings, but these settings don't specifically mean anything when dealing with the NEF after the fact. Lightroom has some presets (I don't use Aperture, so I can't speak to it) for raw development that apply a "start point" that are quite similar to the picture controls, but are not ...


3

A little research has revealed the cause of this problem. The problem was only affecting those photos taken in portrait mode that had also been rotated on the computer to make them easier to view. By mistake I'd rotated them on the SD card rather than copy them first and rotate the copy (which I normally do). The Coolpix doesn't seem to store orientation ...


3

I got a Kata KT D-3N1-20 earlier this year, and I love it. Tried to find a good backpack with side opening for easy access and landed on the Kata. They have different sizes with and without a pocket for laptop/tablet. Based on the bag you have now you might want to look at the Kata 3N1-22 or maybe even the 3N1-33 (larger). I also have an old Lowepro ...


3

I've been loving my ThinkTank Photo Retrospective 10. One of the things it does well is fit my iPad. The iPad will fit easily in the front pocket, snugly in the back outside pocket, and tightly in the inside back pocket; none of which are in the way to get the camera in/out. There are several sizes; the 7 or 5 might be more appropriate for a small kit and 7" ...


3

Just so you know: What you see on your camera is the embedded thumbnail in the RAW file. What you see on the computer is the software's interpretation of the RAW file. Most likely, your files are fine but the software is having trouble decoding the RAW files from your camera. This is a regular occurrence since RAW files are different between cameras. ...


3

You are correct. The D5100 does not have a Depth-of-field preview functionality. If you take a look at the list of Nikon DSLRs, the one with the icons in the shape of an iris have that feature. The D7000 just below the D5100 on the list has it. Typically, this function does not make it into entry-level cameras. The best you can do it take a test shot and ...


3

I think you should be able to do it using "exiftool" --- I tested on a Linux PC, via commandline, and with a Sony ARW image, so your mileage may vary --- I have no DNG to test with. The command is basically: exiftool '-previewImage<=myown.jpg' test.arw (the quotes are needed in Unix to prevent the shell interpretation of <=). I have a bit of ...


2

This often depends on how you originally import. Most RAW files include a JPEG preview image embedded in them. You have a variety of thumbnail options when importing, including 'Embedded & Sidecar'. The JPEG preview will often look different than the unprocessed RAW file, and when using 'Embedded' thumbnail processing, the embedded JPEG thumbnail will be ...


2

In the classified series lowepro has this monster. I have it, I like it for a few reasons: 1) It carries quite a lot of gear. 2) The wallet part is nice, zippers closed, and is unobstructing/unobstructed by your gear. 3) It's fairly discreet(for such a huge bag). 4) The quality is very high(as with all the bags in this series). 5) It's not a ...


2

The filter you're thinking of is a Wratten #90. They used to come as gels, so you'd have to get a gel holder or just hold it and operate the camera one-handed. (Or just hold it in front of your face and don't bother with the camera.) Both of your cameras have a mode that desaturates the image before storage, which would let you chimp it on the LCD after ...


2

Where you get the "File contains no Image data" after viewing files on your PC is generally down to various viewer and edit programs ADDING information to the original file. A simple test to see if it is the SD card that is corrupted is to put it into your PC and see if you can read all the files. If you can then the SD card if fine. Microsoft Photo Viewer ...


2

Geeqie can do this -- turn on the "Enable Image Grouping" option, and files with the same base name will be grouped. (It doesn't do anything magic to link files by actual contents that I'm aware of, though.) You should be able to install it with yum install geeqie or apt-get install geeqie on Fedora or Ubuntu. I'm not aware of pre-built packages for Mac or ...


2

Almost all SLRs for the last several decades do metering and allow focusing, either manual or phase detection AF, with the lens at its widest aperture setting. This allows focusing to be more accurate and the viewfinder to be as bright as possible. But this also means the DoF when viewing the scene through the viewfinder is not an accurate indication of the ...


2

Unless you ask Adobe, you will not get a definite answer but I can tell you why this is beneficial. I spend nine years working on a real-time image processing application and the way to achieve high-performance is to use something similar, we called it a Cache and Lightroom calls it a Preview. The basic principle is simple, you speed up loading by having ...


2

A lot of image view/edit softwares produce thumbnails of highres jpegs as it still takes quite some time to load a full size jpeg (note windows 7's hidden thumb.db files for example). 10Mpixel and above will also be quite slow to access from memory even on modern computers. Thus, internally softwares will rescale the images to the view as to not perform ...


2

Doesn't look like. The closest I got to achieving the effect you are looking for was to hit m to hide all side panels, F11 to go full screen, and then play with the scrolling wheel until the crop area filled the screen. Not perfect, but kinda works. EDIT: As an alternative, darktable will behave differently with regards to the cropping. Once you selected ...


2

You can also look into using exiftool (also a command-line utility) to extract the embedded JPEG from your RAW image. EXIFTOOL - http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/ This is the line I have in a batch file to run in Command Prompt (Windows): exiftool.exe -if $jpgfromraw -b -jpgfromraw -w extracted-JPG\%%d%%f_%%ue.jpg -execute -if $previewimage -b ...


1

Previewing exposure correctly should be most important but most DSLRs do not even get that right! The full effect of shutter-speed is rarely previewed but there is a good reason for that. Better Live-View systems such as those by Canon and Sony, simulate the exposure by boosting the signal according to shutter-speed and aperture but still refresh the ...


1

The LCD brightness is normally adjusted for ease of operation and visibility. It's meant for basic review to make sure you have the data, not for exposure correctness. There are two things you can do, though: Learn to ignore the appearance of the image and trust the histogram on review instead. Turn down the brightness of the LCD screen. It may be harder ...


1

That is normal, if your image also appears brighter when you load the jpeg thumbnail from the raw file. That's how mine reacts as well. It is because the in-camera settings clips more of the highlights and/or apply more gamma/brightness than your default setting in your raw software. The raw shows more accurately how you actually exposed the images and the ...


1

You should choose a default preview size that best approximates your monitor's resolution[1]. If you frequently want to zoom in, then rendering 1:1 on import might be a good idea. Be aware though, that even when the previews are already rendered 1:1, there still is some load time, because the files have to be fetched from your disk. Considering your second ...



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