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by Bart Arondson

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13

The "Auto power off" feature can be toggled as one of the unit's "custom features". You need to set feature number 1 to have the value "1". To set the custom features: Press the "C.Fn" button for 2 sec. or more so that "C.Fn" is displayed on screen. Select the Custom Function No. Press the + button to select the Custom Function number ("01"). Change the ...


7

If you open the plugin file in a text editor, you can see all the settings associated with the preset. In the case of this one, I can find the following: VignetteAmount = -100, VignetteMidpoint = 0, Which suggests that it's not using 'post-crop vignette' but the lens correction vignette instead. You could verify this by applying the preset, and checking ...


5

On the export dialog, set your image sizing (I set mine as you requested). Then click the add button in the bottom left hand corner of the dialog. Set its name And you are all set.


5

Yes. Find the preset file and open it in a text editor. You'll be able to see the adjustments applied. To find your preset folder, open the Lightroom preferences, click on Presets at the top, then click the Show Lightroom Presets Folder button. This will open the presets folder, then you can go into the Develop Presets, find the one you want, and open ...


5

Unfortunately no, there is no direct way to partially apply a preset in LR3. A "Fade preset" slider is sorely missing, in my opinion. It is however pretty easy to achieve if you have Photoshop. There are a few ways to do it, but at the end of the day it boils down to sending your original file to PS as a layer A, then sending your file with the preset fully ...


5

Yes! While a preset is going to adjust for a common average and will not be perfect in most cases, they can get you close, and can be seen as a starting point. Take for example a wedding photographer: To greatly simplify things, you could say that there are a few basic shots that you take very often: posed with flash lighting ceremony pictures with ...


4

First off, while Lightroom is a fantastic program, it does have its limitations. Creating photos like the ones you linked might require some work in Photoshop to get the full effect. Photoshop supports reusable actions as well, which would make it possible for you to create an action that gives you this specific look, and reuse it over and over to create ...


4

I really like PresetsHeaven. It's the biggest collection of presets and examples I've found so far.


3

Apply the preset to an image Modify the setting you would like changed in the preset Click the "+" sign under the presets window to create a new preset, or right click an existing preset and click "Update with current settings" If it is adding vignetting I would look at the Lens Corrections Develop module, as well as the Effects Develop module.


3

First a brief explanation... A picture style/profile is simply a recipe; it is a means of interpreting the raw data of the sensor. It dictates the tone, contrast, sharpness, brightness, and other ways of interpreting the raw data. When shooting jpeg then these recipes are used in the conversion of the raw to jpeg in camera. So to answer your questions... ...


3

One of the good resources is LightroomKillerTips blog by Matt Kloskowski. Matt publishes new presets quite regularly and each post includes before/after example and the preset download. Presets Section on LightroomKillerTips Also 140 free Lightroom presets by Jack Davis Lightroom Presets by Bryan Wheeler


3

I think you will want to use the split toning section in the develop module to adjust the color. There is a decent tutorial on split toning at digital photography school.


2

Lightroom presets are no magic, they just change development settings. Aged Photo is really simple, some playing around with brightness, contrast, saturation and noise reduction. Switch to development mode and apply-undo the preset a few times, observing development settings. Should be really clear what it does. Also, see Is there a way to decompose a ...


2

Use "lift adjustments" to see the details of any adjustments to the image. For example, after doing "Auto Enhance", the lift adjustments HUD shows: Enhance: Vibrancy (0.20) Levels: Auto Levels Edge sharpen: Intensity (0.50), Edges (0.22), Falloff (0.69)


2

Right click on the preset, select Show In Explorer. Then open the file in notepad or any text-editing program. It will list all the parameters and their values and you can edit this file at will, or create new ones.


2

I think the unfortunate answer to your question is......you can't. Sorry! Perhaps it might be possible to use some kind of automation system to do this outside of Lightroom (if you could guarantee each preset was going to be in exactly the same place on the screen every time, for example), but that's all I've got!


2

If you're on a Mac, and there is a menu-item for what you are willing to do, you can assign keyboard-shortcuts to these menu-items. These are the instruction: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH3957


2

You're right. The picture style only affects JPEG development. The main exception is detailed here — cameras usually use these settings for review (which may affect the exposure decisions you make) and for metering (which may affect the exposure decisions the camera makes). Some RAW converters may use it to set defaults; others will ignore it. Many viewers ...


2

Let me explain how to accomplish this, then once you know that, you can do it and save the preset. First, take a subject similar to one you might use. Here is a baby image that looks good for a pastel treatment: Note that the contrast and tonality are pretty good and that the detail is good throughout. Now, in the Lightroom Develop Module, slide the fill ...


2

FYI, this article from Adobe documents the file location of these presets: Installed and custom presets and templates have filenames ending in .lrtemplate and are located in folders under the Users/[user name]/AppData/Roaming/Adobe/Lightroom folder. Another link (for LR4, but I presume this also holds true for LR3) confirms that "factory" or ...


2

Best bet is to download some LR presets, try them out and see how close they get you. You probably are going to want to reduce saturation, and it looks like remove some green and or blue. From there you can adjust things. My two favorite places for good presets are: onOne Software free preset pack: ...


1

The problem with doing what you want in Lightroom is that for the most part Adobe products ignore the maker notes section of the EXIF metadata. In fact, if you convert a Canon .cr2 file to .dng, the maker notes are stripped from the file. The maker notes section is where the picture style setting at the time the photo was taken is stored in Canon files. One ...


1

The in-camera contrast and saturation settings have no effect on a RAW file when opened in Lightroom. The Lightroom profile you have selected determines how the image is displayed based on the RAW data. You could create a customized profile in Lightroom with increased saturation and decreased contrast that is applied every time a RAW file is opened from a ...


1

Have you considered trying to get most of the way with the look you want at the time you take the pictures? Common attributes of the pictures you posted: Lots of even light everywhere. Shoot outside, on a day with overcast sky. Shallow depth of field. Use a long lens, or wide aperture, or both. Dress your subjects and props in pastel colors. Starting ...


1

If you look in our Photoshop FAQ, there are some good links - you'll probably find your question has been asked and answered before. Particularly: What benefit does Lightroom offer over Photoshop + Bridge? What Photoshop plugins are must haves? List of Lightroom resources, including presets


1

we are in the same boat, i've been looking for a way to cycle through presets in lightroom and the only thing i found was VSCO KEYS, that gives you 10 preset slots then with Command 1, Command 2, etc you can scroll through your favorite 10 presets, its sad that lightroom doesn't allow you to scroll.


1

Actually, I think you can do this. I'm not at my computer with Lightroom right now, but there is a menu option to copy various settings from a picture and then a key combo to paste them to another pic. The copy settings option lets you choose just to copy certain categories of settings, like just white balance or exposure.


1

X Equals has lots of presets: X-Equals Also, if you go to the lightroom Plugin exchange, there are lots of presets as well as plugins Adobe Marketplace & Exchange



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