Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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50

Generating High Quality Ink Jet Prints Making effective use of professional photographic ink jet printers is tricky business, especially when the statistics that are commonly used to describe these printers are vague and misleading. Learning how a ink jet printers function, how to properly interpret their capabilities, and make the most effective use of ...


35

You ask if there is a practical difference. So the answer is yes, albeit a very small one, but some of the other answers have missed it. You're right that the only difference is in the metadata: if you save the same image as 300dpi and 72dpi the pixels are exactly the same, only the EXIF data embedded in the image file is different. (I've even verified this ...


25

There are some general rules you can use to determine the "maximum" (I use that term loosely) print size. Keep in mind that the quality of a print is often more dependent on what is being printed than its size in megapixels, and even if your image size is not dense enough to mathematically fit onto a certain page size, you can still blow most images up ...


18

Emprical Study: Extreme digital upscaling For all of the theory above, thats all it currently is...theory. It is the end result of days of research on the physical characteristics of printers, the theory behind printing and ink, the concepts of DPI and PPI, etc. The real question is, how does it stack up against empirical evidence? Does it withstand the ...


16

The information above is quite good, so I won't try to compete, but here is a nice infographic: The boxes are the number of megapixels for a print of the size in inches according to the scales on the axes. This is at 300ppi, which is a standard for the print resolution of many images. This great graphic comes from an article at D215.


14

Generating High Quality Ink Jet Prints: Summary Making effective use of professional photographic ink jet printers is tricky business, especially when the statistics that are commonly used to describe these printers are vague and misleading. Learning how a ink jet printers function, how to properly interpret their capabilities, and make the most effective ...


13

When it comes to print, terms like DPI, resolution, PPI, etc. get thrown around without much care or concern as to what they truly mean. So, before I send you off to a more in-depth answer about DPI, PPI, resolution, and print, a quick summary: DPI: Dots Per Inch A 'dot' is a single element of a pixel On a computer screen, a dot is a single 'sub-pixel' ...


12

jrista has the start of the formula, and it covers images viewed at arm's length quite well. But that 'conventional wisdom' devolves into unreasonable numbers as soon as you get to anything "big", say even a 16x20... requiring 5-6000 px. And if you hit poster size, say 30x40... 9000x12000... 108 MPix?! When you're talking about really big prints, it's ...


10

Does an image edited and saved/exported with 1200x800 pixels at 300 ppi look any different online than the same image saved/exported with 1200x800 pixels at 72 ppi? No. A bitmap produced either on-screen or on paper from the image will be identical. The only difference would be the default print size from some applications, and only then if the image ...


10

Emprical Study: Does PPI Really Matter? For all of the theory above, thats all it currently is...theory. It is the end result of days of research on the physical characteristics of printers, the theory behind printing and ink, the concepts of DPI and PPI, etc. The real question is, how does it stack up against empirical evidence? Does it withstand the test ...


7

Unsharp mask works just fine when sharping for print, the original method was actually used when creating prints in a darkroom. You just have to know how to adjust the parameters for the specific resolution. A good base value for the radius is 0.1 mm, which you have to translate to a value depending in the resolution: radius = 0.1 mm * ppi / 20 So, for ...


5

It depends on a few factors - primarily the print technology that is going to be used, and secondly what the print is to be used for. The D700 shoots at 4256 × 2832 (12.1 MP), so the largest Square frame you can print at 1:1 pixel ratio would be 2832 x 2832 pixels. Lets say the print is to be at 600 DPI, which is a fairly standard high quality signage dpi, ...


5

Pixels per inch don't actually exist until the image is rendered onto some physical medium such as paper or the monitor on your computer. The device doing the rendering determines PPI and PPI determines how large the image will appear when rendered. Rendering your 4000x3000 on a device capable of producing 240 PPI would produce a 16.6"x12.5" physical ...


3

As you wrote it, the answer is that there is no difference (until you print it or look at it in a document that will be printed). First a clarification: PPI is pixels per inch, a description of the resolution of the image. DPI is dots per inch, a description of the physical ability of the printer/scanner being used. pixels (on a side) = ppi x inches. ...


3

Pixels Per Inch, or PPI, is a measure of density or resolution (resolution in the sense of fineness of detail, which again refers to the density of information, rather than dimensional resolution, or the physical parameters). Not all devices that can be used to view photos have the same pixel density. Computer screens tend to range from 72ppi to 109ppi in ...


3

There won't be an impact to photography itself. The display medium is changing and that means that better details in displayed images but prints require more resolution still. This is not as new as you think. Over 10 years ago, I had a loaned IBM T220 on my desk which is a 9 megapixels display. The precision was incredible and while the list price dropped ...


3

300 would hold up better if people will view it up close, but then again, for up close viewing, chances are the tiles are going to be more visible. If the ideal viewing distance is a bit further away, anything upwards of 150 is fine, though the higher quality you can pull off, the better, so I'd go with 200PPI if you have a native resolution of 600PPI. If ...


3

What you're suggesting in terms of resizing sounds correct, and you can use any number of tools to do it. If you're on Windows you can use IrfanView, and naturally almost any of the pro line of tools will do it (such as Photoshop). It's also worth noting that most of these tools will also let you set the width as a function of their physical size (cm, ...


2

PPI (pixels per inch) value of a digital image is only metadata used to determine how large an image should be printed. You can set the value to be whatever you like, without having to resize or do anything with the actual pixels. For example if you took your 4000 x 3000 image at 240PPI and placed it into Adobe InDesign it would end up 16.6 x 12.5 inches ...


2

When it comes to Sharpening settings I would say it comes down to personal preference. I do not use the tool for Output Sharpening when exporting, any sharpening needed I do in the Develop module. As for resolution the web browsing "standard" is 72dpi (ppi). But keep in mind that this number does not really matter. In almost all cases of viewing a picture ...


2

The ICC profiles are not really related to sharpness, they are used to get correct color. As far as sharpening goes, you want to over-sharpen a bit from where you would normally for screen viewing, because the pixels are more obvious on screen. I tend to go about 10% farther in my sharpening when I am planning to print. Also, in photoshop, I always sharpen ...


2

Note: in this answer the word 'resolution' is used in the optical sense: "the ability of an imaging system to resolve detail" (Wikipedia). I think your question has some of the answer in it: They have certainly taken display technology closer to the print medium quality. I think that is the goal. What would a perfect display be? Be visible in both ...


1

I suppose that it depends on who is doing the speaking. If the speaker has half a clue, you should understand their statement to mean that they're saving the image at the same dimensions but lower resolution. That is, if your goal is to provide a preview image that can't be used to make high quality prints, you save it as (for example) an 8"x10" at 72dpi ...


1

I don't think it will have any effect on photography, in any case displays will always lag significantly behind camera resolution. By the time we actually have 5 megapixel displays we'll probably have 80 megapixel cameras! Fundamentally size and viewing angle are more important than resolution (in terms of numbers of pixels). Unlike digital images, which ...


1

I'm going to sort of disagree with all the other answers that talk about DPI or PPI rules of thumb, and suggest two different 'rules' (based on PPD, from another answer of mine) Rule 1 — The 'Retina' rule (aka the Pixels-Per-Degree (PPD) / 'better than your eye can see' rule) This comes pretty much straight from Apple's Retina display designs, the idea ...



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