Fresh Dew on a Rose

by adarsha joisa

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1

Step 1: Duplicate layer As we don't want to do any destructive editing, make sure you duplicate your layer (Layer>Duplicate Layer) and rename it. Quick Selection ToolStep 2: Selection If your foreground detail is out of the fog and it's the background you want to clear up you'll need to do a simple selection so the foreground stays as is. The Quick ...


2

I want to corroborate what chuqui said above and add a bit more detail. Fog works like adding white to all pixels, and it reduces both your sharpness and contrast. Any algorithm that tackles one of these two can be helpful to you. The classics are overall contrast, unsharp mask (try a large radius then a small one) and smart sharpen. But there are also more ...


1

This image may actually feature very little Photoshop or post-processing from any computer software at all. It may simply be taken with lights gelled to the appropriate color, and with the lens defocused.


6

Your options are limited; the fog is an opaque item and post processing can only do so much. You can enhance or reduce the impact of the fog by adjusting contrast. It may or may not help much, it may impact other parts of your image. but effectively, the fog is turning the image into a very low contrast image, so increasing contrast can reduce it's impact. ...


1

You can improve the image you capture by upwards of 1% (very nearly 2%) in quality by using a polarizer if there is fog without much overcast, and perhaps by an additional 0.05% using an enhancing filter to cut the excess blue a bit. Anything more than that means shooting in the weather you wished were happening at the time - trying again another day, or ...


0

Besides the obvious Lens Blur it looks like it was overlayed with a Gradient Fill layer using a custom color gradient, or the overlay could have been a layer containing a few coarse color splotches: yellowish on bottom, bluish left, and purplish right.


1

I don't think there is anything particularly special going on. It doesn't take multiple captures and HDR to explain the pictures you show. You do need decent sensor dynamic range, but not excessively so for a good modern camera. These picture seem to be taken a bit before dusk. That and the overcast sky accounts for the flat lighting. Since the ...


0

As told in the comments, I think it is an HDR image. HDR uses a set of photo's with different exposure, and blends all the well exposed parts in the image to one image. Therefore, all parts of your image are detailed. On wikihow you can find a nice tutorial on HDR images. This result is being created: With 3 seemingly boring pictures: It is hard to ...


2

Those images you pointed to are very low-contrast images. Several thing you should try to do is to change contrast in high low and mid tones. Also you can try to change the colors of image the saturation in HSV channel. Highly recommended, alien exposure software in which you can play with image contrasts colors ect.


0

I think you need to remove the subject from the copied background layer, before applying the blur. Use the selection you are using to create the mask - and use it to cut out the subject from the copy. Then apply the blur. Then apply the mask.


3

This is quite easy in Lightroom. The first thing I would do is start with an image of a bridge in some fog, the good news is that I have one already. Too bad it isn't the Golden Gate and too bad it's not that great of a shot :) Then head over to the develop module in LR and the Tone Curve selection. Inside of it click on the bottom right box to "Edit ...


0

If this image is digital, you can achieve similar effect if you layer black and white version of the image over the color one and play with layer interaction methods (overlay, multiply, etc.), transparency of the B&W layer and with the B&W layer tonality (levels, midtone contrast, B&W conversion etc.). Look up Bleach Bypass method for both ...


0

Lightroom simulates a photography darkroom processing, so the values of highlights, shadows measure in %, so you are applying a value up or down on the the highlight pixels in the image. If you want to add an extra effect you can combine with the exposure or the curves. Or for particular areas you can use the brush tool and apply more. A great way to get ...


3

Use the "Lens Blur" filter, which is basically a variable diameter blur function that a) avoids the effect of the focused object bleeding into the background and b) uses a more realistic kernel which more closely resembles an out of focus background. You can select the area you want to remain sharp in advance, and then tell the filter how much the rest of ...


2

This has been asked and answered three years ago, but I'd like to refine the difference between the two types of layers. The normal layers in Photoshop are like you said "image layers", personally I prefer calling them "raster layers". The adjustment layers in Photoshop are data layers. They hold no function other than to overlay certain changes to ...


0

Such retouching is not the strong point of Lightroom. It is designed to do general adjustments to the whole image - a local manipulation is therefore difficult to apply using Lightroom. Photoshop however is built for those tasks. There are many elaborate techniques to soften skin, but you might want to try the spot healing brush (and the clone tool) as well ...


1

Depending on the extent of the shine, reducing the Highlights or Whites sliders can help with undesirably shiny skin. Another technique for reducing brightness in a specific part of the image is to reduce the luminance for a particular color in the photo. You can you use the "HSL" panel and select "Luminance" and dial down the luminance of the color or ...


0

As mentioned by jdlugosz your first line of attack is going to be the black and shadow sliders in LR 5 (you'll have much poor results in lightroom 4 or older), but as you boost up the exposure in the blacks you're going to likely be adding in a bunch of noise. It's going to be a challenge fixing it very well, but here's my line of attack: Globally, do what ...


0

Photoshop has a Highlight/Shadow adjuster that is very handy for exactly that. In ACR or Lightroom, you have better control and the labeled sliders and histogram zones are easy to understand. In dXo's raw converter, it magically figures it out, but you can still fiddle with it. Check out their free trial, and run your image through it. Since you mention ...


0

I read that the Canon 7Dmk2 has a killer feature for sports lighting which times the exposure to synchronize with the lights. To fix in post, try shooting a burst which will get the stipes in different positions on each frame. Stack them (auto-align) in Photoshop and use brightest choice for each pixel via blending mode and parameters.


0

If the whole scene is illuminated by a single light source, it might be possible to create a "flat frame" by taking a picture of the uniform white background illuminated by that light source, and then using the flat frame to compensate your photo for uneven illumination (divide the photo by the flat frame in photoshop/gimp/other). Preparing a good quality ...


0

It's almost impossible to remove them in post. You'd basically have to repaint the image digitally. Choose a shutter speed that is slow enough to solve the problem in advance and in camera - it's always a better idea to solve problems as soon as practical. Sadly, I don't know a good formula to determine the best speed, but you could just take a few test ...


4

There are a quite a few image processing algorithms apart from those commonly used in photo software. Each are designed to enhance certain properties. For example, some common properties are: speed localisation (good localisation means the detector response is only high near the edge) edge size (e.g. only detect large edges) edge straightness noise (does ...


3

Increasing saturation retains the relative saturation levels, while vibrance reduces it. So saturation is good if you want to increase the overall saturation (e.g. to compensate for cloudy weather) while keeping the original color contrasts. Also remember that you can use both sliders to reduce color. Reducing saturation gives nice muted colors. Reducing ...


-1

While you may be able to edit the file into looking a little bit like that, specially if you use layered edition in photoshop, the easiest, fastest and I'd even say best way of achieving that effect is to just shoot in the golden hour. https://500px.com/photo/94181465/the-girl-and-the-tree-by-jorge-c%C3%B3rdoba-sim%C3%B3n That photo was taken during the ...


1

The sliders only work within a specific range where they can presume usable information within the image. Beyond that, there's a good chance of damaging the image by pushing the values too far. That said, with images like yours, sometimes you need extreme measures. There are a couple of ways you can push the limits here. The easiest is to switch to the Tone ...


5

Occasionally you want certain colours to stand out and saturation gives a better result than vibrance. It's hard to tell in advance when this is going to be the case so you just have to experiment. The saturation slider still has its uses, however. It appears that saturation is applied after vibrance, so you can push vibrance higher than you want then dial ...


0

This would be pretty easy to do using colo(u)r balance in photoshop shadows boosted blue + magenta mid-tones more magenta more cyan and yellow in highlights


3

You can reverse-engineer the coloring in Lightroom. In the following copy I simply white-balanced on the subject's shirt, resulting in this "less-golden" image that looks more likely true to the original color. Lightroom indicates that the transformation "back to normal" involved significant color shifts towards blue and magenta (-15 temp and +11 tint).


2

I don't think the original photo was produced using only global white balance adjustment. It appears to have been produced using mixed light sources (fill strobes not matched to the ambient light temperature) and/or some local adjustments as well. This can be done by selecting various areas in different layers and altering the color for that specific area. ...


5

An important part of that look is the lighting, which is most likely achieved by shooting during the golden hour. You can also tell from the lack of harsh shadows on the subject. Besides that, I see a green/yellow predominance in the tint, probably reproducible by white balance correction. I did a quick experiment using GIMP, and using color balance ...


0

Your question reminded me of Dan Winters' portrait of Christopher Nolan in Wired. See here for examples of DW's style: http://www.wired.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/1d_nolan_f.jpg http://fadedandblurred.com/spotlight/dan-winters/ The lighting techniques and post processing steps are described in this video (15 min): ...


0

Use the radial filter tool, use with an appropriate radius to "paint" on the face in the photo. E.g. you can turn down the highlights, whites, midtones.


0

Look at the slice featute in save for web and save it as a set of tiles of reasonable size.


0

Does Lightroom have a way to apply effects to areas of a photo based on drawn masks (bezier curves, etc) and parametric masks (R, G, B, Y values)? I use an open source RAW processing program called Darktable which allows me to apply an extra Exposure operation to the areas on the image that fall within a (bright) pixel brightness range, with the exposure ...


0

Don't use "save for web", just use "save as" -> "jpeg" instead. You can save it at any size you want then.


4

"Save for web and devices..." is all about file size management. It's hard to argue that a 45MP image (2:3 aspect ratio with the long side at 8191) is slightly too small for a web page (yet, at least). And convenience, I suppose, since it offers one-stop shopping for a bunch of things that would otherwise be separate menu options. You can use Image→Mode... ...


4

If you have a reasonable statistical model of the noise sources then yes, you can do better than median filtering, but not by that much. It's much easier to boost performance by simply shooting more images. With regards to exploiting the slight misalignment of images, this can be used to increase resolution, the technique is called super-resolution and ...


1

Instead of applying a block grad filter in post processing, you could: Photoshop: Create new layer. Change blend mode to overlay. Select a soft black brush at 10% opacity. Paint into desired areas. In Lightroom: Select a new adjustment brush. Decrease exposure, increase contrast, etc. Paint desired areas.


2

Lightroom 4 and older the general advice was to limit the size of a catalog because it would get slow and sluggish. The size limit varied, but 20-25K seems a good general consensus depending on the hardware you're running it on. Lightroom 5 fixed those problems. I've been running a catalog with 40,000 images in it fine. If you're running on old, slow ...


2

Right... this question and its answers has been bothering me for a long, long time. It's actually more likely that the first linked shot ("Mallory", back-3/4-lit by a setting sun on the beach) was done in-camera with a D40 (or one of its 6 megapixel Nikon stablemates, the D100, D70 or D50) than with another DSLR. And you don't need anything special, ...


1

In Gimp or in Photoshop: -use the Lasso tool. Yes, it's a bit more meticulous, but if it's just for one photo, it's not too much effort, and I think it's worth it. Select the area that you want and connect the points. It will take about 2-3 minutes. -After you made the selection, go to Colors>Curves. If you've never worked with curves before, in this ...


10

This is pretty easily done with a layer with a simple linear gradient, from black to transparent. Alone, that looks like: (In the above, the background is rendered as white, but in the actual layer it's transparent). Change the opacity up and down to taste — as you can see from the top of the image there not being black, I've put it down to about 15%. ...


1

You can try this software: http://smartdeblur.net/ It's able to detect blur kernels automatically.


4

Aperture and other programs have a Shadows and Highlights tool that can be used to bring more of the picture into balance exposure-wise. Bringing up the shadows will make the area where the girl is sitting a bit less dark and prevent the brighter areas from drawing the eye. You'll probably have more luck with this if the original image is raw, since ...


2

I am unfamiliar with Aperture, but you could use any program that emulates a graduated filter, e.g. Adobe Lightroom. Check out this link part "2. Reducing atmospheric haze". Basically what this does is: applies a gradient on the photo in the direction and strength of your choosing, so you can darken the top and gradually decrease the strength of darkening ...



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