Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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1

The answer would always strongly depend on the tool you are using, but what you need to do logically is separate the color you want to work with out, for example by using more or less sophisticated selection tools in your software; or by splitting to three separate images for R, G, B (even elementary software can do that, like PSP 7) modify the contrast of ...


2

You are using the wrong term to define what you wish to accomplish. The examples you show are different due to the increased SATURATION of the hue of the sky. Sliders in most every software for image manipulation allow you to choose the specific colour channel and to effect the change you wish. There are three variables when talking about any specific ...


3

selecting the "Adobe Standard" profile causes the contrast in the blues to be quite noticeably higher than the "Camera Standard" profile I suppose that you should shift blue primary towards magenta and make it less saturated in camera calibration tab. Adobe profiles are essentially a combination of matrix and HSL map. The main difference between camera ...


6

You could change contrast of individual channel by curves. I'm not sure if this is what you want though, because it will throw out the image color balance. Instead of changing contrast you can change lightness or saturation. This can be easily done in LR - there is a set of individual HSL color sliders for that. If you still want to change contrast and ...


1

I think the quickest way to do that would be to use the adjustment brush and draw the effect in the desired area. Choosing the area by globally selecting the desired color (or hue, for example), means all areas with that color in the image are affected. This can lead to strange situations like changing the contrast in the sky means changing the contrast in ...


0

There are 2 things to be taken care 1.It will work only on documents with original background layer 2.You have to set the desired color on the canvas extension area in the canvas option


1

There are a few companies that sell stereographic lenses for SLRs. Limited set of focal lenths but it should do what you want. One example is the Loreo 3D


3

how would you represent an image with a 60° span without just leaving most of it black? You can't do it without leaving most of it black. With a 60ºx60º image, you've only covered 1/18th of the 360ºx180º view, after all. Cardboard, being first and foremost a VR viewer, requires equirectangular input to represent the entire VR environment, so whether ...


0

This began as a comment and grew enough to become a potential "answer." Here's a bit of physiological trivia that might throw some light (!) on why ~5000K was chosen as a good "correllated colour temperature" standard for critical colour comparison. At that wavelength, human eye receptors in the retina are optimal for red, green, and blue radiation. ...


1

Yes, it's possible, but a consumer software is probably not yet available. One of the recent examples: Let there be Color!: Joint End-to-end Learning of Global and Local Image Priors for Automatic Image Colorization with Simultaneous Classification by Satoshi Iizuka, Edgar Simo-Serra and Hiroshi Ishikawa from Waseda University Abstract We ...


0

Similar to the logic used by the GIMP plugin mentioned in Roflo's answer, you can also use the color picture to colorize the gray scale picture. You then first approximately align the two pictures (using e.g. Hugin). Then take the color image, transform to XYZ colorspace and attempt to correlate the gray values in the X and Z channels to the gray values in ...


0

You can also use channels in Photoshop to help bring it back. A lot of photographs are restored by using this method. Here is a link to a tutorial. I have no affiliation or gain from linking to this website. Hope it helps! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2Srw245R7U


1

If you're willing to use GIMP instead of Photoshop, there's a plugin named colorize-gimp just for that reason. If you don't know or want to compile, apparently there's a compiled Windows version available.


1

Can you provide me some reference of this? If it's done by increase ISO, is it same as I increase ISO when capturing the photo? If they won't be the same, what's the difference or which way is better? Some cameras have analog ISO gain, some don't. Some cameras may have analog gain implemented only in certain ISO range. Different raw processors may ...


0

I wonder that if I increase the exposure of a RAW in some software, say, Lightroom, what do I lose in the image. It's important to keep in mind that no matter what you do to post-process a raw image to create some other output that is more readily "consumable" (i.e., JPEG, or PNG, etc.), you will lose data compared to the raw file. There is much more ...


4

...is it same as I increase ISO when capturing the photo? If they won't be the same, what's the difference... The end result is similar, but how you get there and the side effects are different. Increasing the ISO setting on the camera results in the addition of gain (amplification) in the path between the sensor and analog-to-digital converter, which ...


0

(Disclaimer: I'm Italian, it's fatiguing for me to write in English and moreover to write in technical jargon. Thus, the following explanation take a few shortcuts to be easier to write and to understand) I'll start from the bottom; increasing ISO in camera cannot obviously be like increasing the exposure of a file, whatever the algorithm used: increasing ...


0

Here is a page where you can get overlays to add the type of light effects you are looking for: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LanternLaneGifts There are a few different ones to choose from, but this one looks close to what you are going for: https://www.etsy.com/listing/210317470 Hope this helps! -Tim


1

The industry standard for viewing color prints is 5500⁰K. I think that this fact is moot when viewing images on a monitor. Becasue the human eye/brain combination has a built-in white balance mechanism, the brain automatically adjusts the sensitivity of our vision system. This occurs all the time but you are likely unaware. Try this test: Procure some ...



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