Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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Photoshop Ram Requirements Photoshop by default does not require a lot of RAM, however when working with larger files or files with a larger bit depth or effects like the Liquify Tool, it can play an important role in performance. If you intend to use any of the video editing capabilities of Photoshop this will also be true. I recommend not working in ...


1

This depends on what you plan to do with the images... Natural Edits By natural, I mean staying true to the level of quality the JPEG provides in respects to white balance, exposure, etc. No, you will not yield significantly better images. You will, however, yield more experience in photography by obtaining a better understanding of the limitations of ...


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Yes, you will get better image quality. 14-bit NEF is far superior in the amount of color data contained compared to JPEG. (14 bit means a much wider dynamic range being captured.) Another issue is JPEG artifacts (JPEG is lossy) so if you want to cut around, create a composite image, you will have serious troubles around the high contrast edges. Tuning ...


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No. RAW files are certainly capable of being converted into better quality images but that will not improve your photography. There is a huge difference between better photography and higher image-quality and these are largely orthogonal concepts. Think about it, there are great images made famous taken on a film camera of 60 years ago. Its quality of ...


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You can achieve that bright look by using a slower shutter speed like 1/40 or slower with the sun not touching the sensor of your camera and the subject. You can experiment with the aperture. You actually don't need any editing to achieve the look. Hope this helps!


4

There are some books about Gimp but as you've discovered, not nearly as many as about other programmes, and particularly Photoshop. However, as @Morpho has suggested, searching online is a very useful option here; there are many many text and video tutorials out there. The way I am learning Gimp is by tackling projects. Start with something you want to do, ...


0

There's a Nikon endorsed photographer named Cliff Mautner, and he said in couple of places that he does not do post processing. All he do is cropping and minor changes and he just chooses a good natural light and go with it. Apart from him, I have not seen anybody who claimed not to post process. So it really depends on the photographer but I think 95% of ...


3

Why are you looking for books? There are so much tutorials on Youtube..that can visually tutor you It depends what you are actually looking for, but Youtube has amazing collection of videos. For example, http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=basic+photoshop have a look here. Some basic Photoshop will help you out.


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Besides post-processing, a soft focus or diffusion filter will soften detail. With proper lighting it may also add a halo effect to the subject. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/457719-REG/Tiffen_W52DDFX2_52mm_Digital_Diffusion_F_X.html


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Usually, people are aware that they have it, but don't want it to be so pronounced. If you can use Gimp, there is a plugin called Wavelet decompose. In this site there is some information on how to use it to retouch pictures. I like that technique because you don't need to complete remove what doesn't please you, but you can minimize it so the picture ...


2

Yes, this is easy if you have a good ICC profile creation tool like i1Profiler and a color checker shot with your camera. Step one: Create an ICC profile from the color checker data and use the current light source condition as the illuminant for your profiles white point.. Step 2: Create another profile with the color checker and the new illuminant. ...


3

Samuel, as some of the other answers have suggested, layer masks are very useful for this sort of thing. I wish I had learnt about layer masks earlier in my journey (and you may already have done so given the age of this question!) But in case it's useful to others who land here, here is my explanation of layer masks, and how they can be used in this ...



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