The Sleeping Giant's Sea Lion

by Jakub

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1

Paintshop Pro is for making pixel edits to individual photos (à la Photoshop). Aftershot Pro is for organising and making non-destructive edits to RAW files (à la Lightroom).


2

There are several ways to approach this, and there are two 'problems' that you are looking at. The first is the panoramic format... One could use the approach done by photographers who shot APS-P images (or put a mask over a 5x7" (127mm x 177mm) slide or negative to get a a 60mm x 170mm frame (example: Above it all - the Arca Swiss 8x10 is an 8x10 ...


1

I would try processing the RAW three times optimised for - the girl herself the reflection, and the rest of the scene Then combine those 3 as layers in Photoshop using layer masks to bring out the relevant parts of the different parts of each layer. You could also try experimenting with blending modes to see if any of those help.


1

]I got something a little bit better. First off I don't know what's going on with the color management when it's still in sRGB) butopefully maybe my workflow will give you some ideas. What I did was convert to LAB and created a mask based on the a channel modified by curves. I.e. I isolated everything that was not green. I did some fussing around with the ...


0

In PSD create a new layer on top of the image with the style set as 1% stroke and )% Opacity. then on your layer remove the stroke. Then you can use a layer style> gradient> white to clear> ANGLE> low opacity. I used this when I had to create a vector image of what a picture in a frame would like and placing it on top of a real image of a bedroom wall. ...


0

Here is a crude workaround; export all photos you want to adjust to tiff. Import back into library, make your clarity adjustment, select all and sync.


0

Ok, I see your problem. NO you can't do that with Sync and get different values. Sync looks at one thing as a whole when you use it. I would do this. Take ONE photo and do the correction you want on it, THEN make that a PRESET to use in development. Do the same for the next photo that has a different value you want, THEN make that a new preset to use in ...


4

Sort of. In the Library grid view select the photos you want to edit. Then on the right panel look for the "Quick Develop" area. You can decrease clarity and a few other attributes.


1

If you are sure you want to apply it to all photos, the easiest method is to create a Preset which you then apply at import. To do so: Open any photo in the Develop module Enable Chromatic Aberration settings as desired In the left hand palette, click the + next to Presets Name your preset and ensure that only the CA correction settings are checked Click ...


2

The reason why is because "equalize" needs a "what is important"-type qualifier (a "metric"). Although in the literal sense, you are right, but there are several types of equalizations. E.g. check out this paper. You can see several types of equalizations there: Adaptive histogram equalization Dualistic subimage histogram equalization Dynamic histogram ...


3

To answer the question in the title: Because not every photo has chromatic aberration, and therefore not everyone wants to enable the fix. Also, since automatic defringing looks for fringe colors to remove, it may actually desaturate parts which are of this color but not fringed, even though this is not very likely. So you would need to go to the menu ...


0

@AndyBlankertz - As I'm sure you are aware, when you are deconvolving some image, you'll deconvolve everything, including noise. However, as I believed you were alluding, if those programs are able to base it's deconvolving on a threshold, then, some noise that is below the application's threshold might not receive any deconvolution treatment. In ...



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