Serene Life

by garik

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12

You have to convert them to some other format, but that format doesn't have to be JPEG. For example, you could save the files as TIFF or PNG instead of JPEG. RAW files are data read more or less straight from the sensor, so it doesn't make sense to "resize" such files. You have to instead process them into a useable image format, which you can then ...


11

You can't view a RAW image, because a RAW file is not an image, it is a set of monochrome luminance values. When the data is converted to RGB using demosaicing certain settings such as contrast, saturation, etc. are applied. There has to be a value for those settings. You are much better off learning to use the histogram (also drawn from the JPEG preview) to ...


5

You could use dcraw to convert the raw image data to a "raw" tiff file that only contains the raw image data. You do that by giving the command "dcraw -D filename". This will produce a tiff file without any demosaicing or scaling. Such a tiff file is then smaller than an ordinary tiff file because each pixel is then only either a "red", "green" or a "blue" ...


4

You can use Magic Lantern to display RAW histogram in live view and image review. Head over to http://www.magiclantern.fm and download the version available for your camera. The installation instructions are different for each camera and can be found in their forums. In order to view RAW histogram in the preview, you could shoot with the technicolor ...


3

About the colors - It doesn't really matter, it all depends on your color to black and white conversion. I guess green or blue cloths will be easiest to manipulate (see below) because those colors have their own slider and they don't appear in skin tones. About the patterns - I don't know. Your camera's sensor only records color images, conversion to ...


3

I'm afraid there is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as mapping of incoming light values to output pixel values is never 1-to-1, not even for plain visible light photos. You can start by reading about gamma correction and tone mapping. Typically, the exact mapping will vary depending on the content of the photograph. I suspect you will have ...


2

Some of the answers here discussed a more complex question: what is the optimal mapping of more than 4 colors into a 3 component image. This is a very subjective question. From an artistic standpoint, there is no good answer. But from an engineering standpoint, one can use compression algorithms. A very basic algorithm for multiple band compression is ...


2

There are several ways to approach this, and there are two 'problems' that you are looking at. The first is the panoramic format... One could use the approach done by photographers who shot APS-P images (or put a mask over a 5x7" (127mm x 177mm) slide or negative to get a a 60mm x 170mm frame (example: Above it all - the Arca Swiss 8x10 is an 8x10 ...


2

To understand why you can't do this, it's helpful to understand how RAW works. A RAW doesn't actually contain colored pixels, it's a single channel ("gray scale") image representing alternating red blue and green pixels called a Bayer pattern. To actually get the "actual" pixels, you have to extrapolate from each of the pixels neighbors using a complex ...


2

Actually it's very simple. If you open the Histogram tab, there are some basic statistics about the color values, such as mean, standard deviation and median. Depending on the selected tab (RGB, Red, Green, Blue, Value) you'll get different statistics. If you want to know the average color, take the Mean from the three separate channel histograms and ...


1

Since most of all images are shown either in RGB or CMYK mode, calculating an average color value from there is difficult because you have 3 or 4 values per pixel. I would try to convert the image into HSV mode (Hue, Saturation, Value). There you have one specific color value for each pixel which is easier to calculate. See also here: Wikipedia Link HSL and ...


1

One way you might use clothing colours is to place emphasis on certain parts of the photo. For example if you were taking a portrait shot, a shirt of a slightly darker colour to their skin tone could help to pronounce the face. I can't say much for patterns, I have always preferred a more plain look in portraits as I think otherwise they can provide a lot ...


1

Your best option is probably using the "Neutral" picture style, this will apply minimum processing with a flat tone curve and no sharpening. This will give you the closest thing to a raw histogram available in-camera but it will make the jpeg look dull and lifeless - so you'll lose the ability to use the jpeg and preview for anything except judging focus.


1

Paintshop Pro is for making pixel edits to individual photos (à la Photoshop). Aftershot Pro is for organising and making non-destructive edits to RAW files (à la Lightroom).



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