Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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10

This is pretty easily done with a layer with a simple linear gradient, from black to transparent. Alone, that looks like: (In the above, the background is rendered as white, but in the actual layer it's transparent). Change the opacity up and down to taste — as you can see from the top of the image there not being black, I've put it down to about 15%. ...


5

Occasionally you want certain colours to stand out and saturation gives a better result than vibrance. It's hard to tell in advance when this is going to be the case so you just have to experiment. The saturation slider still has its uses, however. It appears that saturation is applied after vibrance, so you can push vibrance higher than you want then dial ...


5

An important part of that look is the lighting, which is most likely achieved by shooting during the golden hour. You can also tell from the lack of harsh shadows on the subject. Besides that, I see a green/yellow predominance in the tint, probably reproducible by white balance correction. I did a quick experiment using GIMP, and using color balance ...


4

Aperture and other programs have a Shadows and Highlights tool that can be used to bring more of the picture into balance exposure-wise. Bringing up the shadows will make the area where the girl is sitting a bit less dark and prevent the brighter areas from drawing the eye. You'll probably have more luck with this if the original image is raw, since ...


4

There are a quite a few image processing algorithms apart from those commonly used in photo software. Each are designed to enhance certain properties. For example, some common properties are: speed localisation (good localisation means the detector response is only high near the edge) edge size (e.g. only detect large edges) edge straightness noise (does ...


4

"Save for web and devices..." is all about file size management. It's hard to argue that a 45MP image (2:3 aspect ratio with the long side at 8191) is slightly too small for a web page (yet, at least). And convenience, I suppose, since it offers one-stop shopping for a bunch of things that would otherwise be separate menu options. You can use Image→Mode... ...


4

If you have a reasonable statistical model of the noise sources then yes, you can do better than median filtering, but not by that much. It's much easier to boost performance by simply shooting more images. With regards to exploiting the slight misalignment of images, this can be used to increase resolution, the technique is called super-resolution and ...


3

Increasing saturation retains the relative saturation levels, while vibrance reduces it. So saturation is good if you want to increase the overall saturation (e.g. to compensate for cloudy weather) while keeping the original color contrasts. Also remember that you can use both sliders to reduce color. Reducing saturation gives nice muted colors. Reducing ...


3

Use the "Lens Blur" filter, which is basically a variable diameter blur function that a) avoids the effect of the focused object bleeding into the background and b) uses a more realistic kernel which more closely resembles an out of focus background. You can select the area you want to remain sharp in advance, and then tell the filter how much the rest of ...


3

You can reverse-engineer the coloring in Lightroom. In the following copy I simply white-balanced on the subject's shirt, resulting in this "less-golden" image that looks more likely true to the original color. Lightroom indicates that the transformation "back to normal" involved significant color shifts towards blue and magenta (-15 temp and +11 tint).


2

Right... this question and its answers has been bothering me for a long, long time. It's actually more likely that the first linked shot ("Mallory", back-3/4-lit by a setting sun on the beach) was done in-camera with a D40 (or one of its 6 megapixel Nikon stablemates, the D100, D70 or D50) than with another DSLR. And you don't need anything special, ...


2

This has been asked and answered three years ago, but I'd like to refine the difference between the two types of layers. The normal layers in Photoshop are like you said "image layers", personally I prefer calling them "raster layers". The adjustment layers in Photoshop are data layers. They hold no function other than to overlay certain changes to ...


2

I am unfamiliar with Aperture, but you could use any program that emulates a graduated filter, e.g. Adobe Lightroom. Check out this link part "2. Reducing atmospheric haze". Basically what this does is: applies a gradient on the photo in the direction and strength of your choosing, so you can darken the top and gradually decrease the strength of darkening ...


2

Lightroom 4 and older the general advice was to limit the size of a catalog because it would get slow and sluggish. The size limit varied, but 20-25K seems a good general consensus depending on the hardware you're running it on. Lightroom 5 fixed those problems. I've been running a catalog with 40,000 images in it fine. If you're running on old, slow ...


2

I don't think the original photo was produced using only global white balance adjustment. It appears to have been produced using mixed light sources (fill strobes not matched to the ambient light temperature) and/or some local adjustments as well. This can be done by selecting various areas in different layers and altering the color for that specific area. ...


1

Those images you pointed to are very low-contrast images. Several thing you should try to do is to change contrast in high low and mid tones. Also you can try to change the colors of image the saturation in HSV channel. Highly recommended, alien exposure software in which you can play with image contrasts colors ect.


1

This is quite easy in Lightroom. The first thing I would do is start with an image of a bridge in some fog, the good news is that I have one already. Too bad it isn't the Golden Gate and too bad it's not that great of a shot :) Then head over to the develop module in LR and the Tone Curve selection. Inside of it click on the bottom right box to "Edit ...


1

The sliders only work within a specific range where they can presume usable information within the image. Beyond that, there's a good chance of damaging the image by pushing the values too far. That said, with images like yours, sometimes you need extreme measures. There are a couple of ways you can push the limits here. The easiest is to switch to the Tone ...


1

Instead of applying a block grad filter in post processing, you could: Photoshop: Create new layer. Change blend mode to overlay. Select a soft black brush at 10% opacity. Paint into desired areas. In Lightroom: Select a new adjustment brush. Decrease exposure, increase contrast, etc. Paint desired areas.


1

In Gimp or in Photoshop: -use the Lasso tool. Yes, it's a bit more meticulous, but if it's just for one photo, it's not too much effort, and I think it's worth it. Select the area that you want and connect the points. It will take about 2-3 minutes. -After you made the selection, go to Colors>Curves. If you've never worked with curves before, in this ...


1

Depending on the extent of the shine, reducing the Highlights or Whites sliders can help with undesirably shiny skin. Another technique for reducing brightness in a specific part of the image is to reduce the luminance for a particular color in the photo. You can you use the "HSL" panel and select "Luminance" and dial down the luminance of the color or ...


1

You can try this software: http://smartdeblur.net/ It's able to detect blur kernels automatically.



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