Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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3

This is known in the field of image processing as "depth from defocus". What you are suggesting is possible to a degree, the results will never be the same as you'd get (especially if you use Gaussian blur rather than lens blur!) but it will simulate a certain amount of There are various techniques to achieve depth from defocus, it's a bit more involved ...


3

It's my understanding that most raw converters apply a multiplier to linear values, either demosaiced or not. (The big exception is Adobe.) This mimics more/less exposure in the camera, and the end effect is that a file looks likes it had been exposed in camera at the net exposure (actual exposure + exposure adjustment in the converter). But don't just take ...


2

In Lightroom there are various settings that come under the 'Lens correction' umbrella. The 'Enable Profile Corrections' flag will correct the image based on the type of lens it was taken with, so if you copy it from an image taken with a 10mm lens onto an image taken with a 20mm lens, it will correct the latter for distortions caused by the 20mm lens. If ...


2

I believe @Jasmine is correct and just so you know, there's really no such thing as a "macro lens effect." Macro photography usually means that the size of the subject and the size of its reproduction on the sensor/film plane are the same, 1:1. Think of photographing the head of a bee, in the case of macro photography the image of the bees head on the ...


2

For the bloom you can duplicate the layer, blur it and set its transfer mode to screen or add. You might need to play with a curves adjustment to control how much bloom you have. The blur on the caterpillar might be recreated with a directional blur on a smart object and then some masking to limit it to desired locations. A shallow depth of field is hard ...


2

There is a simple method to automate the process using Photoshop. It could be recorded as an action or scripted. Load all of the images into a stack and take the median of each pixel (there is a built in function to do this, might just be in Photoshop extended though). This should give you an image of just the background. Load up the first image and paste ...


1

Alien Skin had a Bokeh plugin for Photoshop that handled the subtle fogging of defocussed hi-lights - photoshop CS6/CC now has what looks like the same function and system in Field Blur - the key is to have some scattered highlight points in your image


1

One of the ideas with UniWB is to make the histogram show something that mimics the actual RAW data. The in-camera-histogram is based on the embedded JPG - not the RAW data. Simply put, you get a more correct measurement of the RAW data. As you have this, you may pull up exposure to the limit - as you get a good indication where that actually is - lifting ...


1

The whole point of UNIWB is avoid clipping the RAW data, something which is pretty much irreversible. You ask what the point of this is, since you obviously don't want to use the UNIWB setting in your final image, and hence the red and blue channels will be clipped when applying a standard white balance. However, during RAW conversion you can reduce the ...


1

The PTAssembler link below explains a lot about those projections. It specifically answers the question you asked ... Why use the different projects? http://www.tawbaware.com/projections.htm Actually, as you'll see, PTAssembler has those variations so that you can get the control you want. Think of it as, what a DSLR is to a Point-and-Shoot. Max Lyons ...


1

Which projections are useful to you depends a lot on what type of panoramas you're making, the image itself, and how you want to present the pano. That list is pretty standard for any Panorama Tools-based GUI (that's where the PT in PTGui, PTAssembler, PTLens, etc. comes from). I'd say take a spin through this Hugin manual page on projections to get a ...


1

What seems to have been done is to enhance the contrast while the skin of the woman has been treated with "digital makeup". There are specialized G'MIC tools that you can use to make a person look younger.The problem with doing this by hand is that you need selectively blur the skin to remove the unwanted small scale features while making sure you hide the ...


1

Besides the retouching it appears to only have gotten a treatment with some contrast tool (like levels or curves) and a saturation adjustment. Nothing fancy! user342626 might be right with the dodge and burn tools; they are used to "paint" onto the image, making it darker or brighter. That way the editor can paint with "light" and give form and depth to the ...


1

I agree with the comment. Your camera probably came with software to do this. Look for contrast and more broadly, curves adjustments. The background may have been handled by selecting that color to change it, or by using a dodging tool to lighten it. If you don't have software for that, check out your local retail store that sells software. They'll have a ...



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