Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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6

The photos can be improved, but you would have to pay a retoucher and even then with such a high iso the photos are going to look poor. Maybe pick out a few worth paying a retoucher from the actual day and do a reshoot with someone that knows what they are doing. I spent maybe four minutes in lightroom working on this. Adjusting contrast, black levels, white ...


3

Certainly in terms of the example you've provided, I would suggest looking at how you can recrop images to minimise the impact. In the example image, recrop the photo to a landscape, with the heads near the top, so that you can eliminate the sky. Unfortunately, there's not much that you can do about the overall lack of composition; at the end of the day, a ...


3

Information that is not there is not there, there is no magic against that fact. What you can do is de-noise them in professional software (for example Lightroom). They will certainly look better (the obvious color noise would be gone), but they will never get get crisp and sharp like an ISO 100 shot. As others mentioned, there are other problems with the ...


3

There is a lot more information in a raw file than in a processed jpeg file (or an 8-bit PNG or TIFF). When converted to jpeg many things are "baked in": White balance, black point, white point, gamma correction, other properties of the response curve from dark to light values of each pixel, etc. Once that information is gone, it can't be recovered. ...


3

The most common technique for this is stacking and using masks and layers. I've done this with panoramas in PTGui, using their masking feature to erase ghosts and clones, but I don't think there's any free way of automating this task, because you need to identify the people you want to erase, and you also need to shoot enough "clean plate" to cover all the ...


1

JPEG compression quality is not the main limiting factor for the images coming out of camera. Also, it could well be possible to store sparse data to JPEG files - i.e. saving absent channel values as 0 - and make it comparable to RAW file size or less than that. Following aspects are the reason for using RAW files: the image which camera gets from the ...


1

It is about the accumulation of errors. With a higher bit-depth, RAW files can handle more processing before you start seeing banding and quantization artifacts. You will eventually see those with RAW files that are manipulated too just later. So the primary advantage indeed comes from bit-depth. Another common concern is compression artifacts. When you ...


1

This is very easily done in Post Processing, I'll do it using Photoshop. I did it with 3 adjustment layers which I'll explain. First I did a Color Fill with Blend Mode set to fill using a bronze color. I then adjusted the Blend-If Lightness, Underlying Layer to 0/231, 50/255 Then I did a Contrast Curve on the Lightness pulling the midtones down and ...



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