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123

Not an odd question at all. As a large man myself, I constantly find myself on the lookout for ways in my portrait business to help people look their best (no particular order... just as they came to mind): No broad lighting. This is a 'basic' for portrait lighting, but I'm always amazed when I see inexperienced photographers who simply throw light all ...


32

There are some different styles, and a variety of poses, but for classic portraiture, it's all about the face. Posing the body helps the overall composition and visual interest, but if you forget all else, make sure the face, and particularly the eyes are captured well. No football shoulders. Start with the subject, whether seated or standing, point their ...


32

The most natural looking portraits is usually taken when the subject is not aware of it. To consiously look natural isn't very easy, and untrained people generally can't do it. One method is to simply "wear them out". After a while they will become accustomed to the camera and stop making a face, either because they grow tired of it, or because they simply ...


31

Firstly, you should pose your model. There are ways to accentuate parts of the body naturally. Try posing her arms so that they squeeze the bosom. Another option then is to break all the rules of portrait photography, and instead of using a long lens (that flattens features) use a wider angle (around 24-35mm on full frame maybe) and get closer! By getting ...


29

So, a couple of additional thoughts (from Jay's post) I would have on this would be: Shoot from above, even moderately so. This will tend to minimize certain features (especially under the chin, etc.). Arrange legs and arms to "screen" a little. Consider, for example, a portrait where the subject is on the ground, you could have one leg pulled up and an ...


25

I find the cheesy smile comes out when the subject is uncomfortable. Depending on the style of photo you're after your options fall into distinct groups: The "When did you take that?" photo Sometimes referred as the paparazzi style (although the circumstances are generally more favourable), but the method is very similar -- long lens, wide aperture, and ...


19

People like to see smiles in photos because that implies that the subjects were happy at the time. But getting photographed does not always make people happy. So getting better photos often means helping people relax, get used to the camera (or forget about the camera if necessary), and actually enjoy themselves. Different techniques will work with different ...


18

To add to what Jay Lance said (mostly different phrasing, but also comments on background & accessories) My grandmother used to teach corrective posing & lighting years ago, and her short 2-page handout is in the back of "The Art of Bridal Photography: Techniques for Lighting and Posing", which Google has conveniently scanned. The relevent items ...


16

Tilting forward may help, if you can use those types of poses. Also, if you can use angle light, or angled behind lights, the shadows will accentuate the bosom. However, getting this right may be tricky, because the face may need different lighting, or will show bad face texture or shadows. So you will have to have her turn the head to a different ...


15

If you are taking a fairly formal portrait and are using a tripod, stand a bit away from the camera, carry on a conversation, and trigger the shutter with a cable release or a remote. As the subject relaxes, you will be able to get more natural seeming shots.


15

You want to be shooting more or less dead on to the subject, not to the side. The rule of thumb is that the line of the nose should not 'break' the line of the cheek, and this is doubly true for nasally well-endowed subjects. Avoid wide-angle lenses like the plague - you need to be looking at a 100-135mm lens ideally, as it will flatten the photograph ...


14

A wide angle lens might help, but do not angle the lens upwards - a shot up the nostrils is not very pleasing. While not a shooting technique, you could increase the bosom size while editing the picture. Also poses, where the model leans slightly towards the photographer help, and the model should push out her bosom (make a hollow back). Ask your model ...


13

There are many, many portraits out there shot "head on" - fashion and magazine photos often use this kind of pose. Frankly, their models can pull it off. For the majority of people out there, a straight on pose will most often add a certain bit of weight to the face, whereas an angle to the face can reduce "flabbiness". Most people paying for a photo want ...


12

I use this technique and so do several events photography friends of mine. When we are doing group shots we often invite everyone to close their eyes and think of a beautiful memory and happy thought. And then we tell them that we'll count to three and have them open their eyes, and smile for the camera--on three. What happens is the smile is more natural, ...


10

For dealing with the double chin, there's some excellent advice here but generally you're trying to get the model to elongate their neck and stretch that skin a little. Tell them to lean over their waist/belt and often times they'll stretch their neck a little too. The other thing to do is to put their shoulders more toward the camera and have them ...


10

I assume you mean their bosom, not their chests? Firstly, some reactions to other answers: I would be careful about wider angle lenses as it makes them look less attractive in general. Poses and clothing can do a lot. And using a model with a bigger bosom helps a lot, too. However, post editing is often applied in the professional world. In Photoshop, ...


9

Obviously makeup and post production help. Makeup is the most common solution I know for this. In regards to lighting , it occurs to me that this is an area a beauty dish would excel in. It should fill in the shadows and reduce the look significantly.


8

I always tell people to make the ugliest frowning face possible and make them hold it for a while. After about 30 seconds I say "ok, now you can smile" and the smiles that come out are usually great. But you have to be quick, the smiles will revert back to the fake smiles within seconds. This works on almost anyone, it must be the novelty of frowning in ...


8

I have a relative who behaves like that. The only methods I have found so far basically try to catch him unprepared by:fast surprise snapshotphotographing without raising camera to an eye, either using live view or just trying out luckusing a telephoto from somewhere outside immediate visibility Of course, none of that works for staged portraits.


8

One trick I picked up from Zack Arias is to get the person to "move in" to the expression; you time your snap right to get the expression at the right moment. For instance, he'll have the model close her eyes, and then have her open them. Between the time she's in the resting state of eyes-closed and the posed-looking state when she's conscious of the ...


7

Firstly: I strongly second @kacalapy with his recommendation of Digital Photography School. Second, here are a few sites I've found: Free Digital Photography Tutorials have a couple of nice pages (lots of clear examples nicely explained here and here Jonathan Souer has a step-by-step guide here I know this isn't online, but my go-to reference is ...


7

You can find hundreds of poses HERE. Another good place for information is DPSchool. You can also find some tips here, just scroll down some.


7

Here's an excellent video tutorial focusing on the jawline. There was mention about the "double-chin" effect. This video gives super examples on how to reduce or even eliminate that problem. It works great! It's all about the Jaw


7

If it's for a staged portrait, just shoot and keep giving directions. In order to not embarrass the subject, snap a picture with the cheesy smile, say "Great!" and then follow up with "Now let's try a soft smile" or similar. If they get a serious look because they're uptight or trying to figure out your instructions, just say "Try to look like you don't ...


7

Your best bet is to get them talking about anything other than the photo shoot... work, vacation, kids etc. This gets them more relaxed and they tend to forget, or at least aren't 100% focused on the fact that they are in the uncomfortable situation of being in front of a camera. There are great books on how to pose people to hide flaws... sounds like you ...


7

Here's a couple of suggestions: Classic family or work group portrait: Seat a person or a couple and have the rest stand behind and to the sides. The person or couple sitting down will typically be determined by seniority, but other criteria might create interesting dynamics too, so don't just blindly go by the numbers. Another classic, especially with ...



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