I Dare You!

by peter_budo

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0

I approach this problem by thinking of what can lead to blurry images, then eliminating those factors. Given your parameters, you will be sometimes shooting in low light with a long lens. That means opening up the aperture (reducing depth of field) or reducing shutter speed (increasing the chance of camera shake or subject movement), both of which can make ...


1

Think of it as more of a principle than a rule - you don't have to abide by it but it generally works. If your camera offers a grid overlay (select live-view if using a dSLR) try it out as the grid is commonly set to split the display up according to the Rule of Thirds. Try aligning your human subject(s) with the grid lines and see how "balanced" the image ...


2

The rule of thirds is a very arbitrary guideline, and there's really nothing magical about it. In its original form, it suggests that whenever you have a line or area of color within a photo and something which divides that line or field, you should split it so one section is a third of the thing and the other the remaining two thirds. So, if your portrait ...


3

In addition to damned truth's answer, using live-view and zooming in on the eyes will allow you to ensure your focus point is exactly where you want it to be. Focal lengths between 80mm and 105mm offer a flattering perspective for portraiture, a 50mm prime on an APS-C crop-sensor body will give you the equivalent of an 80mm lens. Primes are nearly always ...


0

With family members who don't like their photo taken ever, I found that honesty and involvement on that person's terms really help. My wife used to hate every photo of her, taken by anybody, any time. I found that discussing what I am trying to achieve - in detail - and involving her in what the final shot will look like and most of all where it will be ...


2

Ensure your subject is well lit and try to use a fast enough shutter speed that you have no chance of motion blur (i.e. mush faster than the usually suggested 1/focal length). Or use a tripod, remote shutter release or and the mirror lock up function of your camera and avoid touching your camera immediately before the shot is taken. Ask your subject to stay ...


2

That's a very big question, and like a lot of very big questions, the answer ultimately comes down to "having an eye for that sort of thing". That's why even though the fundamentals aren't too terribly difficult to come to grips with, people like Amy Dresser are able to make a reasonably good living as assemblage artists in the world of commercial ...


3

The advantages of studio strobes over speedlights for off-camera lighting is not as much like getting a dSLR over a P&S, as it is like getting full frame over crop. While the advantages are there and undeniable, speedlights may actually be sufficient to your usage, especially in these post-Strobist days as a lot of speedlight-specific gear is hitting ...


-1

Instead or in addition to increasing the F-number, you can also consider increasing the distance to the persons or if you use a zoom lens to zoom out. The DoF when focussing at an object a distance d away is given by DoF = d^2/H where H is the hyperfocal distance, assuming that d is much smaller than the hyperfocal distance H (typically H will be of the ...


3

You have quite a few options here, but in practice I've found one that works best for me. Rearrange your subjects so that their eyes are at the same distance from your lens Use a narrower aperture for greater depth of field Choose a focus distance between the two subjects rather than a focus point on one specifically Use a wider focal length(at the same ...


1

If you don't care for dilated pupil, that might make people look more friendly, you can always expose both eyes to strong light, since the pupils take longer to relax than to contract, when one eye is shaded the pupil will still have almost the same size.


1

You should use a different aperture. If you are using a lens that has an aperture with a low number, say 1.4 or 1.8 for example, you should change that to a higher number, say 4.0 or 5.6 The higher the aperture number is, the more closed is the aperture. This reduces the amount of light and increases the are that is within acceptable sharpness. I know it ...


3

As you mentioned, flash works well, using low-power modeling lights to get the desired lighting ratio. The most "desirable" images of people and animals have dilated pupils, which we see as attractive. Contracted pupils indicate anger. High-speed flash is faster than the contraction reflex. You can experiment with flash sync if there is much ambient ...


0

You can look at dXomark to see how much better low-light exposure you can expect. The numbers should compare within a brand and technology, even if they somehow don't tell the whole story.


2

Without knowing what you've already tried, I'll give some suggestions which might help (although the're not specific to the 350d). Use a fast lens with the f-stop wide open (f/1.8 for example) - your 50mm lens should be ideal. Use flash if possible. Shoot in RAW mode with the highest quality setting. Use a tool like adobe lightroom for post-processing. ...


0

Post production maybe? If there is a annoying difference and you spot it after taking the photo, you can Photoshop it. If you want to make it in studio, maybe triggering the in-camera flash just before taking the picture will make both eyes to get about the same amount of light and the pupils should shrink to a similar size.


21

Buckle in for a long answer. There are three primary advantages that "studio" flash have over hotshoe flashes. The first, and most obvious is power; even the lower-powered "serious" units (we're not talking about AC-powered lightbulb-shaped slaves) tend to start at at least the equivalent of 2 "full-sized" speedlights (of the Nikon SB-910/Canon ...


4

I'm sure there will be very comprehensive answers to this well-structured question, this one is just from the perspective of someone who doesn't own anything more powerful than a speedlight. Besides the ability to pop flashes brighter/farther/faster/longer (nothing I need for my modest purposes), what seems like a game-changer to me is the point where a ...


0

Could you abandon the plan and just follow them around for a while, photographing them at home, and while they're driving or on public transport, at the pub/office/theatre, and so on, firing shots every time you like the scene and the lighting? Doing this I found three groups of people: those who hate the camera and scowl at it, those who love the camera ...


1

Your question has two aspects, how to prevent people from over-preparing for the shoot, and how to get them to relax during the shoot, so I will address each individually. Preparation: From what you've said, it sounds like your subjects may be feeling a bit pressured into getting the perfect shot. This will cause them to do what makes them feel the most ...


0

My 2 cents. 1) Before the photo. Yes, a good portrait is a special moment, you don't want to make it after a crazy party where some have the eyes red or bags on the eyes. They must look for the clothing he or she really likes, not just the suit that is in the closet sicne last year. 1 or 2 options. Define the type of portrait. Casual, rustic, elegant, ...


0

You don't have to be honest about the process you intend to follow. This is something that is exploited in many psychology experiments. In this case, you could explain to the subjects that to make the perfect pictures of them, you first need pictures that are less than perfect where the clothes they were must be casual clothing they were at home; the makeup ...


0

To make someone comfortable just start talking to them casually without showing them that you are searching for a photograph with a perfect natural pose , as the person sitting in front of you will start getting comfortable you will notify that some how there body will make a triangle shape either with hands,legs ,etc. NOTE: any person sitting or standing in ...



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