Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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8

It can be hard to pick up, but the shadows on the wall behind the backdrop in a couple of shots should be telling you that there is a light immediately behind the subject. There is one picture with the subject over a large puddle or pool of water, and that one's the giveaway: if you look at the reflection, you can see that there is a small light stand in ...


1

Warning: long meandering, speculative "answer" (and it may not even directly translate to Lightroom). In addition to the already described good practices for portrait photos, there's another subtle aspect that pertains to situations "in the wild" where the white balance you want for the image as a whole doesn't produce very pleasing skintones. I find this a ...


5

The short version of the answer to your question is that you do it both "in camera" and in post-production. A longer answer breaks out into a few thoughts: In Camera Light the subject correctly. I really recommend using an incident light meter (a decent hand held one) to calculate the correct exposure for the subject rather than relying on the reflective ...


0

I approach this problem by thinking of what can lead to blurry images, then eliminating those factors. Given your parameters, you will be sometimes shooting in low light with a long lens. That means opening up the aperture (reducing depth of field) or reducing shutter speed (increasing the chance of camera shake or subject movement), both of which can make ...


1

Think of it as more of a principle than a rule - you don't have to abide by it but it generally works. If your camera offers a grid overlay (select live-view if using a dSLR) try it out as the grid is commonly set to split the display up according to the Rule of Thirds. Try aligning your human subject(s) with the grid lines and see how "balanced" the image ...


2

The rule of thirds is a very arbitrary guideline, and there's really nothing magical about it. In its original form, it suggests that whenever you have a line or area of color within a photo and something which divides that line or field, you should split it so one section is a third of the thing and the other the remaining two thirds. So, if your portrait ...


3

In addition to damned truth's answer, using live-view and zooming in on the eyes will allow you to ensure your focus point is exactly where you want it to be. Focal lengths between 80mm and 105mm offer a flattering perspective for portraiture, a 50mm prime on an APS-C crop-sensor body will give you the equivalent of an 80mm lens. Primes are nearly always ...


0

With family members who don't like their photo taken ever, I found that honesty and involvement on that person's terms really help. My wife used to hate every photo of her, taken by anybody, any time. I found that discussing what I am trying to achieve - in detail - and involving her in what the final shot will look like and most of all where it will be ...


2

Ensure your subject is well lit and try to use a fast enough shutter speed that you have no chance of motion blur (i.e. mush faster than the usually suggested 1/focal length). Or use a tripod, remote shutter release or and the mirror lock up function of your camera and avoid touching your camera immediately before the shot is taken. Ask your subject to stay ...


2

That's a very big question, and like a lot of very big questions, the answer ultimately comes down to "having an eye for that sort of thing". That's why even though the fundamentals aren't too terribly difficult to come to grips with, people like Amy Dresser are able to make a reasonably good living as assemblage artists in the world of commercial ...



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