Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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0

@mattdm covered the main points of your question is his answer, but I want to mention an often overlooked aspect of indoor photography (particularly headshots done with external lighting): the quality of your backdrop. If you are planning on taking pictures of someone outside of a controlled studio setup, be very careful to not have them too close to a wall ...


1

The lighting is the main thing. Choose what you want to do there (try lighting-basics) first. Then, shutter speed doesn't matter (because you are using strobes) so pick the sync speed — 180th or 250th. And because you're providing plenty of light, use a low ISO. (Going up to 400 or 800 to reduce the needed flash power to get faster refresh is fine, though.) ...


0

I've only heard a term for this in one location, but it works well: "short-sided composition." It's from the Story & Heart collaborative community of filmmakers on Vimeo, and it's from this tutorial. I did a quick Google search just now and saw it come up in a few other places; this looks like a good resource with examples from Drive and The Social ...


0

There are variety of telescopic lens in the market. Its upto you to choose the best which suites your requirement and budget. Lens like Sigma 150-600mm, Sigma 70-300mm are very good for wildlife photography. Along with telescopic lens, one should also have a prime len for some amazing clarity and picture quality. Hope this help!


2

You want the option with more strobes. For portraiture you can get away with one strobe. Maybe with a reflector for fill. But you are limited in what you can do with such a setup. If you want a white background for example, things can get complicated with no dedicated light for that. You could get a cheap speedlight for such occasions, but if mixing systems ...


0

Usually, photographers like more background blur, which you achieve with: big sensor, large aperture, and long lens (50mm or higher); which are all more expensive. Lucky for you, that means you can buy a cheaper lens and camera that will give you exactly what you want. What you want is a "slow" (that means a small aperture), wideangle lens (maybe around ...


0

You will find that lenses marketed as good for portraits will have a "short telephoto" focal length and a wide maximum aperture. Using a wide aperture is what blurs the background. (This is widely considered to be a desirable effect in a portrait photograph.) But you can always just use a narrow aperture, and the background won't be blurred. Any lens will ...


2

Lens factors that give deeper depth of field The longer a lens is, and the larger its aperture setting (limited by its maximum aperture), the less depth of field and the more background blurring it will give. (See: How can I take a photo with everything in focus with my DSLR?) Portrait lens Lenswise, I'd actually say that what you're asking for is the ...


0

What you want is to have a deep depth of field. This keyword and your favorite search engine will answer your question. Essentially, it depends less on the lens than on how you use it: close the diaphragm and you'll get a deeper depth of field. Now, you have to be aware that most photographer would disagree with you, and would argue that a good portrait ...


1

None. 200 mm is not enough for wildlife. Get the 100-400. If you insist on 70-200, the IS mk II is the best. The f/4 version is much lighter, cheaper and optically also very good, but wild animals are often best photographed around dusk and dawn and in otherwise bad light. So the 1 stop loss may cost you on sharpness and shadow detail. Yes, the 100-400 is ...


1

The occasion for this purchase is a trip I'll soon take to shoot wildlife... Unless you plan on shooting exactly the same wildlife in exactly the same way when you get back home, I'd actually say that renting a Great White L for the trip makes more sense than purchasing one. What you shoot at home and what you shoot on vacation can differ drastically. ...


0

I've been reading everything I could from all sorts of sites, but still can't make up my mind which one to go for This is the point where nobody can help you because it is your decision now. If you read everything, what else to read are you looking for? Rent one version of the lens and see how it works for you. If you are so scared of both buying the ...


0

A lot depends on the situations you want to be prepared for. If you do your shooting during daylight, with generally more than enough light available, you don't need to drop the significant extra money to get 2.8 instead of 3.5 or 4.5. Even a running deer at 300 mm is easy to catch noise free with T=1/400 and f=4.5; if you have nice sunlight, you will end ...


4

I do not know the details, but do not underestimate the power of makeup. Normally this kind of photos have a lot of pre-production work. Just a tip, "back in the days" of film photography there was a film called "lith" for example Kodak's Kodalith, that produced a totally contrasted image, with almost no middle tones. This is not the case because you can ...


3

Without getting into the mathematics of the situation which is covered by others with graphs and equations, let me try to clarify the difference between these two different aspects of the lighting. Quantity and quality. The quantity or the amount of light is determined by how far the light travels. All other things being equal, the shorter the distance the ...


2

Assuming that the video you saw is this one, rewatch the near/far usage of the light, but pay attention to the line of the shadow on the model's face. Note that when the model is near the softbox, that the line is wider and blurrier, i.e., softer light. But when the model is farther away from the softbox, that line becomes smaller and more defined, i.e., ...


-2

Inverse square law is only about the intensity of the light. 2x more distant is 1/4 as bright. It is NOT AT ALL just about point sources, its about softboxes and umbrellas too, IF you ignore the fabric and measure the distance to the actual flash tube. There will of course be dumb arguments, but inverse square law is NOT measured from the fabric surface, ...


0

The law of the invers square is only truly valid for point light sources. For photo purposes we are taking about a bare light bulb following the law almost exactly. As soon as you place this lamp in a reflector or cover it with a diffuser, the resulting light fall-off does will not strictly follow this rule. The extreme would be search light that outputs ...


2

"Soft light" is a term used to refer to light that produces diffuse shadows father than distinct shadows. But that doesn't mean you can't have some areas that are very dark and other areas that are very bright when using soft light. It just means the transitions from the bright areas to the dark areas are more gradual and less distinct. The reason you want ...


0

Being a model helps understand portrait photography and model photography yes, at a limited extent, the relation on clear indications vs the result, you can have a little idea on the position of the lights, but that is it. But: He said to help understand photography better would be to have pictures of her done, either clothed, barely clothed or ...


2

Taking pictures of experienced models with the guidance of a knowledgeable photographer is a much better way. You will learn some things as a model, but you are going to learn much better as the actual photographer. I can't say I have ever heard this as advice to become a better photographer (not that I am an expert). She would be much better off seeing if ...


2

I don't think modeling is a good way to learn photography at all. It's a decent way to learn how to plan and perform a shoot but it has very very little with photography. She won't be controlling the aperture, the shutter speed, the lighting, she won't be picking the angles and dictating the composition. She'll be sitting there while he does all of that. ...


6

Is working as a model a good way to learn photography? It can be, sure. Rather, if the question were more specifically, "is working as a model a good way to learn portrait photography?", sure, why not? Depending on some conditions, that is... Is the photographer good? Is he experienced, does he know how to communicate with and direct models? Does he ...


7

In this particular instance, we don't have to speculate why the photographer used the backdrop on location. In Felix's own words: This is taking location lighting to a new level. I put one of my Oliphant backdrops up in a field and I used daylight as a basis and then added in my own lighting to ‘kick it’ a little. So we end up with this clean studio ...



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