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by Bart Arondson

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0

Another option: Take the portrait with and without the glasses. Then in photoshop, you can select the eyes from the portrait without the glasses and composite them onto the image over the eyes with the glass reflection. It takes a bit of practice but you can with a little care make it impossible to tell you did it.


1

Avoiding Flash Reflections in Eyeglasses: Ep 214: Digital Photography 1 on 1: Adorama Photography TV AdoramaTV Presents Digital Photography One on One. In this episode Mark shows us how to adjust the angle of your light source to avoid flash reflections in eyeglasses. Mark explains "angle of incidence" and "angle of reflection" to help you capture images ...


1

Many early photographers were influenced by conventions in painting that had existed for a few hundred years previous to the invention of photography (this is true of Adams and earlier landscape painting). For example, the photographer Julia Margaret Cameron was influenced by early Italian Renaissance painting as were other photographers from the mid ...


5

Great question - one of the shapers of portraiture was Éduard Steichen for a few reasons - He was a very early photographer ~ 1900s onward ~ consequently, he influenced later photographers simply because he was early. He photographed his portrait subjects in context of their fame / reputation / or in context of their work. He was a master of studio ...


0

This depends on if your problem is focus or camera shake. If it is actually focus, then you can simply configure the flash to fire in focus assist mode. In this case, it will flash before taking the photo so that the camera can focus, but the photo itself will be taken without the flash. If, however, your images are out of focus because the camera is ...


1

The technique you are looking for is called "Slow Sync Flash". On your Canon camera, you enable it by turning you mode dial to "Av" (Aperture priority). In this mode, the flash will fire to expose the foreground, but the shutter will still remain open for a long exposure of the background, just like when you shoot without flash. Beware, that in this mode, ...


2

The contrast in this photo is very high - the light in the background is obviously very bright, but the face is pretty much in shadow. To get the face lighter by only changing settings in the camera can be done 3 ways: Bigger aperture (smaller 'f' number): you were already at the biggest your lens can do at f/1.8 and from what I've seen, that's generally ...


0

Lets assume in the next scenario you are shooting wide open at the slowest feasible shutter speed. Take home message don't be afraid to use a high ISO in this situation. Prepare a couple more things before composing the photo. Set up a spot meter rather than average meter. This will mean that any intense lights or extreme darks don't skew the EV reading. ...


1

I thought about it and researched for a long long time before i purchased my 100mm 2.8L macro lens. This lens does the job of 4 lenses! Number one it's a macro lens, two it's near to the focal length of the 85mm and three, the 135mm. Despite not being able to open up wider than 2.8 it does have IS which those other two don't, so you can let more light in ...


2

Set the shallowest acceptable DOF (this will depend on your distance from subject as @Philip mentions) Set the slowest acceptable shutter speed. Resting the camera, leaning against a wall, or using a monopod or tripod can help lower this speed. The movement of the subject also has an impact of course, but for a portrait type of shot in your example it can ...


0

Raising the ISO, opening the diaphragm, and increasing the shutter speed are the only ways to go, as said above. But be careful with the aperture and the shutter speed: your bright objects will be burnt. Typically, for the picture above, I would have shot it that way, and then post-processing it. On the pictures you take, you should have a look quickly at ...


1

You might want to try and use the spot meter setting instead of the average. In the picture you posted there is a bright object on the right side that is throwing off the rest of the picture.


1

A few things I would consider are: How close to the original exposure is the photo and what determined the 3 main factors: shutter speed, aperture and iso? If you shoot in manual mode you will have chosen these settings yourself (if you set these yourself I would suggest increasing the iso to at least 3200 and your shutter speed to about 1/30th (tell the ...


2

Ignoring the white balance issue which is easily fixed in post, there's a couple of technical things you could look at to improve sharpness: Shutter speed. The general rule of thumb is that you want your shutter speed to be 1/effective focal length. In your case, that would be 35mm * 1.5 ~ 50 and therefore you'd want a shutter speed of 1/50s - but you've ...


0

With RAW, you don't worry about the white balance when shooting. The ISO is misunderstood and overused with RAW: if the image is too dark, turning up the ISO is no different than fixing it in Lightroom (but explainaions I've read don't consider quantization of the A-to-D step). However, the extended range or whatever that brand calls it can help if the ...


2

Improving the lighting would be the first thing to do. On your shot, the face of the person is practically unlit, as well as the background, resulting in too much contrast with blown whites on the right. The fact that the brightest light is facing the camera creates lens ghosts, which is probably not what you want. If you're unable to change lighting, then ...


4

Note: the content originally written for Stack Exchange is also published on my own website photo.pelicandd.com. Although the content is the same, the website contains interactive illustrations which enable to see what each light adds to the setup, as well as the list of books which served as sources. The lighting setups shown below describe different ...


3

Poking around a little leads to his 500px account where metadata is present. It looks like he typically shoots a Canon 5D with a 24mm or 85mm lens.


0

So do I just need to learn how to use this lens, or would a getting a 50mm f/1.8 lens really help with taking pictures of people? Yes. Both. As others have already explained, a lens with a larger aperture will definitely help. It may be more than you bargained for, though! Even on a crop sensor camera, at f/1.8 and a distance of 1 meter, the depth of ...


3

User 25034 wrote "You can but then you need your group to be close and the background as far as possible (like as shooting in a path between trees) " and then AJ Henderson suggested that answer was not very helpful or clear. Part of your original question was "If I really try, I can sometimes get the subject with a blurred background if I move in close ...


9

There are a few things going on here: The subject's hand may be considerably closer to the photographer, but not so much to the camera's sensor plane. The image was shot from just above the subject's eye level (looks like about mid-forehead to me), so the camera was tilted down. You can only see the front half of what you're looking at, assuming it's a ...



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