Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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1

Don't think of the background light as just a background light. Play with it. If you double the distance you will diminish the fallout. You will need to double the output, and probably put a card so you don't spill light to your subject. But play with the light, cut a cardboard in diferent shapes. From diferent angles Put a difuse before the ...


0

If done right, these kind shots can look amazing. One technique is to have your subject stay perfectly still for the 25 - 35 seconds you need for the exposure. Some photographers do this really well; Paul Zizka comes to mind. The other common technique is taking several exposures and masking in Photoshop. Depends on how skilled you are with masking, this ...


4

You can either use a flash to expose the subject (you won't be able to see them walking into or out of the frame), or you can, as you suggest, take two shots and blend them in Photoshop - a matter of a few minutes work. Making an exposure blended shot would require the subject to stand preternaturally still between shots for a decent effect.


0

I really don't think there is any practical way to make a flash less annoying outside of not using it. It is the nature of the beast. Even with light modifiers, its still a ridiculously bright object that can annoy or bother some people. I think it is more important to simply understand that at an event such as a wedding where a respectful and religious ...


0

Some tools I would recomend. 1) A lightweight tripod. You also can buy a monopod. There are monopods with a "small tripod" on the base. 2) A luminus lens. On Canon you have the 50mm 1.8 lens verey cheap, excelent optics... but it is slow as hell on focusing. That is why some people use continus light to aid focusing, becouse you have a verey narrow DOF. ...


6

Tethered selfies are easy to setup, or you could give a try to an "Hair Styling Head" even though that could feel creepy. My solution to this was to do party photography at a local bar to try new techniques and light modifiers. Everything had to be quite portable, but as everything i used was DIY i could deal with it and not be afraid of having it damaged. ...


1

Have a look if there are any local studios, groups, clubs, etc that get together to shoot models. A studio close to where I used to live used to run regular group shoots. Not only was it great for practising and shooting different models in different setups, but you could also see how other photographers interact with a model, and it was great for ...


3

A few people use a polystyrene head on a light stand or table, but I've not been able to find one where I am so I use a cable release and shoot myself until I have something approaching usable then call a friend in for the minimum amount of time I can. This takes longer than shooting a head on a stick, but works just as well, a chair helps you keep the ...


7

There is no scientific evidence for the existence of auras. Absence of proof is not proof of absence, but since a repeatable method for capturing a person's aura would be that proof, we can safely say that auras do not exist, provisionally at least. Anyone who is claiming to have photographed an aura has actually captured an image of something else. Lens ...


6

The closest thing I've seen to photographing an "aura" is a technique called Schlieren photography that helps visualize differences in densities of liquids and gasses. Since living bodies emit heat, they tend to have a layer of air around them that's warmer and less dense than surrounding air. Here's an example: I've seen some web sites that explain how ...


3

Personally I don't believe auras exist. However if they did, according to people who do believe in them, they are both invisible to most people, yet they have a colour. These two statements are contradictory, as having a colour requires something to be visible ('colour' referring to frequencies of electromagnetic radiation that exist in the visible part of ...


2

The most suitable lens of your kit is the one that took the best/most promising images when you scouted the rail road track location beforehand. The first image has an interesting background with buildings and a bridge in addition to the railroad. It adds to the image. A wider lens can include more of the background and the surroundings. The second one ...


6

I think you'll be best off with the 24-70mm zoom. You're going to want a smaller aperture than f/1.8 anyway -- at 10 feet, the 85mm set to f/1.8 will give you only a few inches of depth of field. Your example images have a lot more DOF than that. Using the zoom will give you a lot more flexibility with respect to focal length, and also let you change focal ...


3

In my humble opinion you indeed can start with 2 lights and octoboxes, but for a low key portrait. For a High Key I recomend at least 3 lights. In the example you are showing you can put a light above the subject and a reflector below him, and you can use the second one to light the background (that will make 2). But a third one will give you a lot of ...


4

There are two basic techniques in the photo you reference: First, it uses "clamshell" or "butterfly" lighting — see What is butterfly lighting, and when do I use it? for more. You can easily see this from the highlights in the model's pupils. The resolution is low enough that I can't tell if the fill light (from underneath) is a reflector or an actual ...



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