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38

The pop-up flash produces notoriously bad results if it is allowed to overpower any ambient light and is used as the main light. This is because it is a small, hard light, and it is directly on the camera axis, so you can get a washed out look, particularly if you're photographic a human face - no light and shadow areas. If you use it as fill, it can ...


26

Sure. If you're in a situation where documenting the events in front of you is more important than making a photograph which looks nice, there's sometimes just no other way. You can open the aperture, crank up the ISO and drag the shutter as long as possible, but if it's dark, it's dark. You don't always have control over that, and sometimes you just need ...


21

Webpage with examples at bottom of this post: "Real photographers" [tm] would die rather than use a pop up flash. They'd rather have a large piece of extra equipment on top of or remotely linked to the camera at all times to allow variation in lighting level, multi axis bounce, HSS features, diffuser and reflector options, power variation, exposure method ...


16

The most typical reasoning for this circular obstruction is the use of a lens hood that is obstructing the flash. It could also be caused by a rather large lens itself getting in the way as well. A similar effect can be found when a wide angle lens is used that is beyond the coverage of the flash. I would consider what lenses you were using, at what focal ...


12

They lie. It does, it just not supposed to fire enough to matter. The flash is how it communicates with external units. You can get an SG-31R unit to block it and let the IR only through. Your other option is to ditch CLS and go with radio triggers - of which, if you search, we have various questions about.


12

The problem with the pop-up flash is that it's a small, directional point of light, aiming directly at the subject. This gives harsh shadows behind the subject and makes the photo generally unflattering. There's a number of things that you can do to make this better: Make the point of light larger. The professionals often use massive softboxes - large ...


10

Take a business card with white background and position it at 45 degrees in front of the popup flash. That will redirect it to the ceiling. For most flashes you can make two small cuts on the card to slide it into position and keep it supported by the flash itself. Here is how it looks on my Canon DSLR:


10

Assuming all other exposure settings with and without flash are equal, then using flash means you are adding light to the scene. Increased light in the scene means increased light down the lens, which means more light at the sensor. That means you have a higher signal to noise ratio at the sensor, which generally means less noise. Signal to Noise ratio, or ...


9

A pop-up flash has barely enough power to work indoors of a residential space; in larger rooms, professional photographers have practical reasons why they carry separate large flashguns. The Puffer, whilst making the light slightly less harsh and therefore more pleasing, does it so at the expense of chewing the power even further down. So, your gear is ...


8

The Panasonic L1 did have such a flash, but was (I think for other reasons) largely a flop. It's hard to speculate exactly why this hasn't caught on, but I assume that it's largely because: The built-in flash, for size and because it uses the main battery, can't be very powerful, and bouncing takes more power, so the utility is lessened. Even a clever ...


8

There is a little microswitch in the hotshoe that detects an external flash -- this may have become stuck, or got a piece of grit blocking it. If you cannot see anything under the rails, you may have to take it to your local friendly Canon authorised repair centre, but if you can see some grit, you may be able to carefully remove it with a cocktail stick or ...


6

When you use the pop-up flash on the 7D as a ETTL Master, you have the choice of whether the flash is used as a light source or not. If you choose to not use it, it will not fire when the shutter is open. Don't mistake the pre-flashes that are used to communicate with slave flashes, with the actual exposure flash. Edit and Update: Based on the request ...


5

Actually, by experimenting you can get some decent results. I personally use different kinds of paper as diffusers. I have even used credit card vouchers in a hurry. Unfortunately, my native language is Spanish so it's hard for me to say the correct names of the papers I've used but I can tell you that translucent papers are the best. Other solutions may ...


5

You really only need ONE flash for almost all situations outside. Unless there's a specific look (or effect) I'm going after, I only use a single flash when outside. Indoor studio is a whole other discussion. With flash photos outside during the day, keep in mind, you have two light sources. The sun and your flash. I don't even try to overpower the big ball ...


4

Flash photography can be among the more complex photography, and part of this is due to the smarts on-board the camera, known as ETTL in the Canon world. Do yourself a tremendous favor and read thru the fantastic bible of EOS Flash photography on Photonotes.org: http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/index.html If you use your on-board, flip up flash, ...


4

Flash exposure compensation (Flash exp comp) is in the second menu page (second red page), second option down. You can adjust exposure compensation up or down by up to two full stops. You can also add flash exposure compensation to your "My Menu", the green menu on the end, for quick access as well. Once set to anything other than 0, your exposure ...


4

I'm going to say no. MikeW's advice on using a high ISO and longer shutter is good, and you can do little bounce card and diffuser gimmicks, but the absolute difference these make just isn't enough — the built-in flash still will suck. Most importantly, these gimmicks and other tricks and techniques run against one of your fundamental requirements: no ...


4

I know you are asking about post-processing tricks, but I'm going to offer a popup flash shooting trick that does wonders. Take a business card with white background and use it to bounce the flash to the ceiling and prevent the harsh light of the flash from hitting your subject directly. You can hold the card with your free hand, or if you make two small ...


4

Most Chuck E. Cheese locations that I've been in have generic white ceiling tiles. If that is the case at the location in your town, I would try bouncing the flash off of the ceiling with an external flash rather than using a Puffer. Although the cost is a bit more, the results will be that much better. You can get a Yongnuo YN-468 II i-TTL that is ...


4

The flash will not automatically activate in all camera modes as some leave the decision up to the user when you are exercising a degree of manual control. If you are in manual for example it will only fire when you specifically turn it on by popping it up. More specifically for the 60D, on page 129 of your manual it indicates In Creative Zone modes, ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


3

If indoors, just cover the popup flash with anything (even with your hand, if it's free) leaving some clearance, so the light goes to the sides but not to the subject. It will still fire remote flash with no problems. If outdoors, this is not much of an issue and setting it to -- is usually enough. Additionally, if we're here, you can set your SB700/900 to ...


3

You can try little diffusers and bounce devices, but they have limited effect. Obviously use the fastest glass and highest ISO you can. Let in as much ambient light as possible. Just because the flash is on, don't let the camera select 1/200 and be the sole source of light. The more ambient light you have, the less contrast you'll have with the flash. ...


3

I think the market is vanishingly small for the trouble (warranties, price, etc) it would cause. You're talking about a group of people who: Want flash. Don't want so much flash that they're investing in real flash gear. Don't want a simple accessory like this but would be willing to pay more probably to have it as a 'feature' on camera. Won't be using it ...


3

Yes, you could use a sync cord (or an optical slave) with a hot shoe adapter to provide another hot shoe for your GPS unit. Since the GPS unit doesn't have camera brand specific models, we can deduct it does not need TTL info, just the basic flash signal. Based on this thread it seems using a sync cord will not disable popup flash on your camera, but you ...


3

The best way is to take it to a certified nikon repair center to have it checked out, if it's under warranty. Otherwise seek out a camera repair person who can service it for you. See this related question for why attempting to fix your pop-up flash is a bad idea. To summarize: you could seriously injure or kill yourself if you try.


3

There's more than one potential problem with a built-in flash; the location of the light is just one of them. It's also important to be aware of the power and range of this flash -- especially if you start playing around with diffusing it or bouncing it, as this will impact its range. Short of getting an external flash (which you'll definitely want to keep ...



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