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0

There are two situations being covered in that explanation, which is probably part of what is causing the confusion. Prefocusing simply means that you set the focus before you actually take the photo. This can be useful for a number of reasons, including needing faster shutter response (the photo takes quicker after you press the shutter) or needing to ...


3

This is called focus and recompose. Note the position of the focus point in the bottom left picture - it is between the two people. If you tried to focus there, the camera would focus on the background, throwing the subjects out of focus. So you focus on one subject, then recompose so both subjects are now in the frame. You only have to do this in similar ...


0

While I'm not sure I'd class either camera as "pro", the RX-100 has two big advantages over the Coolpix P340 for night-time photography. Its sensor is about four times larger, so it's high iso noise performance and dynamic range are liable to be better, and the RX-100 has bulb mode (i.e., there's no limit to how long you can leave the shutter open). Thee ...


1

Besides the fact that the Nikon one is thinner, lighter and cheaper, it basically doesn't have any advantage over the RX100 (mark 1, 2 or 3). With much larger sensor, RX100 can have much better performance in low light, higher dynamic range, lower noise at high ISO. With the same wide f/1.8 aperture at wide angle, RX100 with its larger sensor will have a ...


3

The main contributing factor when it comes to low-light performance is sensor size. The RX100 (Original, II or III) all use a 1" sensor which is larger than the 1/1.7" one used on the Nikon P340. You can see the difference in actual size by comparing both of these on my site. Just like at the rectangle in the row with the Sensor Area heading.


5

To start, saying that "professional photographers use DSLR[s]" is a bit of an over-generalization. It is not too far from the truth, though, to say that professionals rarely use fixed-lens compact cameras (which I'll use in preference to "point and shoot" here; I'll explain that later), but even that depends on what you mean by "rarely". To a degree, it also ...


0

(among tons of differences between the 2). DSLRs are faster (mostly focus and write to card speed). DSLRs have larger sensors (than p'n's) that will offer better performance in low light (less noise); have better depth of field control). DSLRs usually have faster shutter speed to be able to take pictures of moving subject (sport events) and the lag ...


0

The main advantages of a DSLR: You have a lot more control over the settings of the camera. The hardware/build of the camera is of higher quality (after a certain price treshold). You can change lens, add filters and accessories easily, it lets you adjust to the type of scene and picture you want for an optimal result. Better build/quality = better ...


1

point and shoot cameras are, by definition, rather bad cameras because you have very limited choice for the camera settings; the camera will make the choices for you, or these are fixed. In addition, the optics and the sensor are typically of poor quality. DSLR cameras allow you to be in charge of the camera when taking a shot, instead of the other way ...


0

I had this happen on my Canon G12. From reading, many sites say it's from sand getting in the lens or dropping the camera. Neither happened to mine and I still got the lens error. I wound up getting it repaired through this site: http://www.camerasandparts.com They only work on the Canons and no other brands. For $89 they repaired it and covered both ...



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