Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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34

For both cases I strongly recommend looking for something with a fast lens (A 2.0 aperture is faster than 2.8 for example) reasonable ISO handling (at least 400, but preferably 800) the biggest sensor available The sum of these factors are really critical for low light situations. In 2012, both the Canon S110 and the Lumix LX7 offered that set of ...


27

To be an SLR the camera has to have a mirror and optical viewfinder as cabbey states. The optical viewfinder has several advantages, namely a crisper image for easier manual focus (as you're getting the full resolving power of the lens, instead of a small LCD screen) and zero lag (as what you're seeing is happening in real time!) which can be useful for ...


25

Larger sensor -> higher ISO, lower noise, better image quality, can shoot in extreme low light conditions Fast focus, no lag -> you can catch moment which is not possible with P&S camera Interchangeable lens, choose one which better fits your needs, conditions, etc More control over DOF, can create portraits with nice looking bokeh, your girl will like ...


24

There's a good answer from Brian Auer, which I'll reproduce here, as it pretty much covers the problem you're trying to solve: Ooh, good question. Yes, but how much will depend on the camera. If the camera has manual controls for aperture, that definitely helps. It also helps if the camera has zoom, as most P&S cameras do. The problem with ...


22

The 1st difference, and arguably the most important one, is the image sensor's size. DSLR has an APS-C or Full-Frame (35mm) sizes CMOS sensors, where Powershots have much smaller, some CCD some CMOS sensors. this translates to superior image quality in terms of digital image noise - the larger the sensor, the less noise is apparent in the image. In this ...


21

Pocket cameras have significantly smaller sensors than DSLRs, usually in the range of 5mm across as opposed to 22mm across. I'm not familiar with the Olympus mu range however I've seen 12 and 14 megapixel compacts. These have more megapixels than DSLRs produced a few years ago, however it is mostly done for marketing purposes. The lenses in pocket cameras ...


18

It depends on what you wish to do. If all you need is to take a few shots of your friends and family in various life situations, a P&S will serve you well. However, if you wish to have total control over your photos, and are interested in the composition, lighting, and ultimate quality of your shots, a DSLR will serve you better. I personally don't ...


18

Although the relative aperture numbers — the ƒ stops — are the same regardless of format, the actual focal lengths of the lenses on small cameras are quite low: 5mm or 6mm at the wide end. That in turn means that the real aperture is small, which is why the diffraction limit kicks in sooner. The smaller format also means that depth of field is hugely ...


18

f/8.0 is often the "sweet spot" for lenses on 35mm SLRs however on a small sensor camera like a Canon PowerShot that aperture is probably causing diffraction - there's a good reason the aperture doesn't go any smaller than that! Light spreads out when passing through a small opening like the aperture on a camera and this results in loss of sharpness. The ...


17

Bokeh is subjective, and all cameras can create bokeh. One pre-requisite to pleasing bokeh is to have sufficiently out of focus areas. Most details that are only a bit out of focus don't look too pleasing. Something is more out of focus the further away it is from the plane of focus. In addition, the the shallower the depth of field, the quicker things ...


17

As well as the "bridge" category, there is also the new category that has yet to settle on a name, but is variously known as (Mirrorless) interchangeable lens compact/camera (MILC or ILC) electronic viewfinder, interchangeable lens (EVIL) single lens direct view (SLD or SLDV) These have different lenses available, as do SLRs, but are smaller due to not ...


16

The answer you found on Yahoo is mostly wrong. The basic statement (same as dpollitt's answer here) is correct — theoretically, image quality shouldn't degrade but a number of factors might make it worse. And the list of things that might go wrong is sound enough. But the mapping of symptoms to problems is very inaccurate. Point by point: One would be ...


15

Potential mistakes include: Overreliance on zoom. Many compacts have huge zoom ranges. People get used to this and either struggle when given a limited zoom range or prime lens, or they go out and buy a superzoom lens with inferior image quality. Being afraid to change lenses. This relates to the last point, people aren't used to changing lenses or are ...


14

The Olympus Tough-8010 is the most indestructible camera there is. It is point and shoot, shockproof, drop-proof, waterproof and freezeproof. My baby even managed to take a picture of herself with the predecessor model (Tough-8000) after biting it for a few minutes! Here's a funny commercial for an older model, it gives you an idea of the 'tough' part.


14

I think step number one is to find something more interesting than crumbs on your keyboard to shoot. And I don't mean that in a flippant way. Get away from the computer and stop taking test shots — start taking real photographs which you find interesting. Take those photographs back and do exactly what you've been doing: play around and make them look as ...


14

Sharpness is a result of eliminating various problems: Motion blur Focus blur Lens issues Camera issues You can avoid motion blur by ensuring you use a tripod, set your camera to use mirror lock-up (if available) and using a remote trigger or timer. You also need to ensure your subject is still! Alternatively, use a flash to isolate any movement to a ...


13

First off, I'll answer your last question: certainly. As you pointed out, prints can be made at places like Walmart (or even the place she is developing film now) using the card, so there's no barrier there to her getting the images out. The bigger difficulty may be her lack of experience with digital gear in general, a lot of people I know in this situation ...


13

A few possibilities you might want to consider would be a high-end P&S, a micro 4/3rds, or a Sony NEX. A higher-end P&S camera (e.g., Canon G-series) gets rid of (most of) the shutter lag common in the cheaper P&S cameras. Image quality can be pretty decent as long as you have lots of light, but like other P&S cameras it deteriorates very ...


12

A lens is needed to focus light on imaging sensor. For example, here's an image taken without lens attached to camera: For comparison, same scene taken with a lens attached: Carl Zeiss is a German manufacturer well known for carefully designed good quality optics; see also what makes a Carl Zeiss lens so special in a smartphone (the reasons are ...


12

Sensor area doesn't determine resolution in the same way as the film era. Back then simply increasing the area of film would yield a similar increase in the size you could print, and therefore the detail you captured. In the digital world sensors can have different numbers of pixels per cm Both 12MP compact and DSLR will resolve similar levels of detail ...


12

Images with your camera will start showing signs of diffraction around f/4 to f/5.6 due to the size of the sensor. Shooting at a significantly smaller aperture (like f/11) will only increase the diffraction problems. You'll lose resolution. Here's a good tutorial on diffraction: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/diffraction-photography.htm


12

Low light and zooming affect quality in two different ways. First low light. Point and shoot cameras struggle in low light because they have small lenses and small sensors. To compensate for this they automatically increase the ISO, which in simple terms is the sensitivity of the sensor to light. The problem is, the higher the ISO, the more grainy (it's ...


11

There are many "truths" in photography, and you'll hear them a lot, variations of: The best camera you have is the one you have on you A great camera does not a great photographer make etc etc. (more variations of how the equipment does not matter) To a large extend, the feelings above are true. HOWEVER, I believe that to be a great photographer you must ...


11

You're not going to get better shots simply by switching to a DSLR. In fact, they may get noticeably worse as you start fiddling with the settings. What you (and everyone else) really need is practice and study. This graph is meant to be funny, but it's also frighteningly true. As for a DSLR: it really comes down to how much money you want to spend, ...


11

I would add: Inattention to focusing. The DSLR has a bigger sensor, and in most circumstances will have a much shallower depth of field than the compact camera. This requires attention to your focus. At the very least, pay attention to which autofocus sensor the camera thinks is in focus, and think about whether that's what you want. You may want to set ...


10

I highly recommend the Canon S90. I have one, and for a point and shoot it has pretty stellar low-light performance. Using it, with a good noise reduction pp produces great results. It's light weight, and feature rich. I paid near MSRP for it, because I bought it new. It has all the bells and whistles you would expect from a point and shoot, plus full ...


10

You might want to try borrowing or renting a camera first. Even the cheapest DSLR will cost several hundred dollars, which can be a lot of money if you aren't sure it is right for you. That being said, DSLRs now are a lot better than they were in pure auto mode, which can make it pretty easy to jump right in. I went from a P&S to a DSLR not all that ...


10

They aren't better per se; They just tend to allow greater artistic control over the result. They're useless for just keeping in your pocket for that surprise sunset, or random performance in town. I'd advocate having the right camera for you. In my case, I'm quite indecisive so that's a DSLR, film SLR, and a digital compact.


10

While the cameras that Alan suggested are good and I particularly like the S95... you can do better for jewelry photography by getting one that lets you get in much closer. Image quality will do in most cases because you should be shooting at a low ISO from a tripod and with white-balance properly set. Canon has the SX130 and SX30 (as well as its ...



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