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12

Is it safe to try this setup on my DSLR(since there will be no lens), mine is Canon EOS 1000D? It is possible to make a pinhole from a DSLR. Basically, buy a spare body cap, then make a small hole in its center. Don't destroy the only cap which comes with your camera, you may need it later. Google for "DIY DSLR pinhole" for multiple instructions. But ...


11

If the diameter of the shaft of a standard pin is about 0.5 mm, then the aperture of that is based on the focal length and that should be the distance between the sensor and the lens mount (flange focal distance). So, given that, the math is: FFD/2 assuming a 0.5 mm pinhole. So, on a Canon EF mount with a 44mm flange focal distance, the aperture is f/88. ...


9

DSLRs read the aperture data from the lens via electronic connections. Reading ƒ/00 basically means that either there is no aperture data on the lens' chip or that there is no electronic connection at all, which is probably the case with your DIY pinhole lens. The diaphragm resides always in the lens, not in the DSLR. So: there is no diaphragm if you ...


8

Every lens, whether made of glass or a tiny hole in card, creates an image circle, which fades to black towards the edges. When you close down the aperture in lens based cameras, the soft edge of the image circle hardens, matching the increased depth of field (it's basically an out-of-focus image of the physical edge of the lens). Hence, with wider ...


6

A company called Rising makes a precision laser cut pinhole lens based on the body caps for various makers, including all the dSLR makers. Included in the documentation with it is the focal length and aperture, but it varies a little bit by body because of the distance from the hole to the sensor. On the Pentax, for example, it's 45mm and f/204. At any ...


5

You need a very thin wall for the pinhole, I'm not sure that it has to be smaller. The mechanism of a pin hole camera is very simple. It simply blocks light from anything other than a single point and the rays from that point get projected to the opposite side of the enclosure. If the walls of the pinhole are thick, then the light can't come from an ...


5

If you are willing to do it the hard way, you can use standard black-and-white photographic printing paper and do a reversal processing on it. What that means is that you will be making a negative, but then making a direct positive from the negative without an additional imaging exposure (though there will be an additional exposure to light). It will ...


5

I can't summarize the whole optical physics theory behind pinhole (mostly because I don't have the proper knowledge!), but I try to explain why there are different values for constant C. One reason that there are different values for C is the fact that one parameter in the calculation of optimum diameter of hole is missing! Let us refer to the wikipedia ...


5

One option is to use a zone plate optic with a wide-angle converter lens in front. An off-the-shelf solution is Lensbaby's zone plate optic + wide angle 0.6× or super-wide angle 0.42× conversion kit. Since the optic gives a focal length of roughly 55mm, the results will be about 33mm or 23mm. Examples are available on Lensbaby's site with the zone plate ...


4

A pinhole is essentially a very small and fixed aperture, so you will need to use Manual mode and set a nice and long exposure (A second or five should be good to see what kind of exposure you're getting for starters) to determine just what you're getting out of it. Also, you will need a lot of light to get any picture at all on your viewfinder since there ...


4

The Wikipedia article you cited does a good job of detailing what pinhole photography is. To summarize in brief: A pinhole camera is the first and simplest form of camera- essentially a lightproof box without a lens and with a hole on one side. The light from the scene the pinhole is pointed at passes through the hole in the box and is projected (in ...


4

I've been very happy with my Skink pinhole and zone sieve. They are very high quality parts and work very well. You can read about them on their website, they use ebay for sales and I'd reccomend them to anyone interested in the subject. What's really nice is that you get to try different inserts, pinhole and 2 different zone sieves! Here's one of my ...


4

Photojojo make a pinhole "lens" for Canon and Nikon, it's f/181 but is not chipped so you won't get aperture recorded in the EXIF data. http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/slr-pinhole-body-cap/ Although Canon surprised everyone recently by releasing a pancake lens I can't see them coming out with a pinhole!


3

The pinhole needs to be small in order to produce a sharp image, but not so small that diffraction becomes a problem. How it works - Size of the Pinhole talks about the size of the pinhole, the diffraction limit, and provides some sample images that illustrate the point.


3

Yes there are "super" macro lenses available. A macro lens usually provides up to 1x magnification, i.e. it can focus close enough to project an image onto the sensor that is life size. Super macro lenses go beyond 1x. The most widely available off the shelf super-marco is the Canon MP-E 65mm which offers up to 5x magnification. Using this lens on an ...


3

A number of people make them for CCTV use - often aimed at security use. Here are some offerings from Goyo Optical Here's the datasheet for their GAPM23824AC 3.8mm f/2.8 - 360 !!! with electrically controlled iris. Modified product table image from the above site:


3

I believe with a pinhole, the vignetting is largely due to light falloff (inverse square law). The distance from the pinhole to the edges of the sensor/film is longer than to the middle of the sensor/film. With lenses, the rear element is of a similar size to the sensor (compared with a pinhole) so the light falloff is not a big factor. Vignetting can ...


3

There are a couple of concepts that you really need to understand to grasp depth of field. First, lenses focus on a plane. You can envisage this as, basically, a razor thin slice of reality and everything in that slice will be perfectly in focus. Everything in front, or behind, will not be. Second, there is a range out of the focal plane that we will ...


2

While a mechanical lens can't communicate its value electronically to the camera, a pinhole lens does have an f-stop value. The pinhole itself is literally the aperture of the "lens", and the focal length is the distance from the pinhole to the focal plane. And the f/number is simply the focal length divided by the aperture. You can find this focal length ...


2

The camera cannot read the lens aperture, that is why it says F00. That is good for you because you have a pinhole lens which, well, does not have an aperture by definition. (Note that sometimes a camera reports this when using legacy lenses too simply because it cannot determine the aperture). Canon makes no pinhole lens, so there is little chance the ...


2

Vignetting is vignetting. And vignetting can occur with a pinhole camera for the same reason it happens with a fancy lens. When thickness of the material is close to the pinhole diameter the rays are cut off in the Field of View.


2

You should first decide what type of sensitive material you are going to put inside your camera. Main choices of camera/material are: Coffee can or shoe box loaded with photographic paper That’s about the cheapest you can make. Exposure times can be long (one min or so) and you get high-contrast paper negatives that are easy to develop and contact-print. ...


2

You can image a red laser across the room shining on your pinhole, and measure the diameter (in pixels) of your first dark ring (if your pinhole is a clean circle). Then knowing pinhole-to-detector distance and the formula for the angular diameter of that first dark ring (about 2.44 * wavelength / pinhole_diameter, in radians) figure out your pinhole ...


1

There are a few routes I think you can go with this but extension tubes, ring lights, and focus stacking are probably the most practical for your constraints (i.e must use DSLR). http://www.diyphotography.net/the-comprehensive-guide-to-macro-photography/ In the past, I used a fiber optic light to tightly control my light source. I used an older variant ...


1

Your best bet would be a fiber-optic camera. Depending on your budget, you might be able to get a crappy one on ebay for around $100 or you could spend upwards of 6k at http://www.gradientlens.com/Flexible-Borescopes/Hawkeye-Pro-Flexible.aspx


1

There are multiple causes for the light falloff which we call vignetting. In lenses, the primary causes are: Poor response to light rays hitting the sensor at a strong angle. That's normal for wide angle lenses, and is fundamentally more of a problem at wider apertures. It's also significantly more problematic in digital sensors than in film, which is why ...


1

Draw straight lines from the left and right sides of your lens front opening, both through a single point at the subject you are focused on, and then beyond there behind the subject. These lines will be extended inside the camera down to one point on the sensor (or film if it's one of those cameras). Both of these light rays, and every ray in between, ...



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