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by Bart Arondson

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28

Sorry but you are confused. Picasa first shows you the JPEG preview that is embedded in RAW files. It then loads the RAW data and lets it be converted by the codec. What you see then is the RAW file with default convertion. In order to get something good from a RAW file, you have to work at it. IIRC there are questions here regarding matching the JPEG ...


25

Lightroom gives you a lot more control over the processing of your images. You can finely tune vignetting (add and remove), curves, sharpening, split-toning, adding clarity, removing chromatic aberrations, powerful noise reduction, de-warping (lens distortions and perspective) "selective editing" (e.g. change the saturation/luminance of one color only, or of ...


22

Programs like Picasa, iPhoto, ACDSee, are pretty much all most people need. They let you sort/manage your photos in a way that lets you find them again, either by searching (e.g. for keywords you've added) or just sorting them in a way that makes sense to you. It's a big step up from having a bunch of folders of badly named photos on your hard drive. ...


20

One result of using a polarizer is the deeper blue skies; that effect isn't hard to replicate using software such as Photoshop, Lightroom, Picasa, or the GIMP. Another important reason a polarizer might be used is to reduce glare and reflections. The best example of this is if one is photographing a puddle or pond; without a polarizer the surface will ...


17

Picasa stores faces information in the .picasa.ini files: [test.jpg] faces=rect64(1eb1929f885e),15441a598f9f1866 backuphash=29866 The id numbers can be found in the contacts.xml file which stores all the contacts of your pictures: <contact id="15441a598f9f1866" name="Test Test" display="Test" modified_time="2010-05-13T17:19:46+01:00" ...


16

There are several features that I think are just awesome in one or the other. Depending on your needs, one of these features will make you (usually + some other things) go towards Picasa or Lightroom. Lightroom: Integration with other Adobe product (Photoshop, InDesign, etc) More sophistication in editing (somewhere in between Picasa & Photoshop) ...


15

There are quite a few alternatives, depending somewhat on what you're after. Workflow software Personally, I like Bibble quite a bit. If memory serves, the Pro version is around the same price as LR, but the Lite version is quite a bit less expensive. One warning: while Bibble works well, they do have a history of being rather late delivering new versions ...


13

GIMP and Photoshop aren't really designed for post-processing per-se. They're both excellent image editors. Ideally what you want to define is a workflow. A workflow goes something like this: Import photos from camera Tag, assign metadata and organize your photos "Process" raw images, using exposure, contrast, saturation etc controls If necessary, use ...


13

Not at all. Lightroom is a great tool with many well-integrated features. Version 4 which is roughly half the price of previous one adds maps, book publishing, soft-proofing to the already useful organization and processing tool. The organization tools are probably worth the price alone and the export feature is the best one I've seen. So what if I don't ...


12

In their documentation here, Google explains: Picasa adjusts your photo's color and contrast to produce the ideal photo. You'll see a change only if your photo isn't already color balanced. That last is the clue: all it's doing is what's known in other software as "auto levels". This is a tool which appears to work like magic in its strong ability to ...


11

You will Never Regret moving to Lightroom or Aperture I'm sorry that neither of these run on linux, (Aperture is mac only). However, I moved from Picasa to Lightroom about 18 months ago, and I haven't looked back. Now I can do so many things with such precision and ease that it's a whole new world! I rave about Lightroom to my friends whenever this ...


10

Lightroom or Aperture I left Picasa for Lightroom a couple of years ago, and I haven't looked back. If you're on windows then I can pretty much guarantee that you will love Lightroom. It just brings loads of possibilities beyond Picasa, and all the editing is non-destructive, so you can always undo edits all the way back to the original RAW file (or ...


10

I don't know all the technical details of how Picasa handles RAW files, but my short answer would be: "Dont even bother". There's a good blog post on using Picasa with RAW files. Unfortunately the conclusion is that it's pretty much useless. Picasa is a photo management app with basic editing and sharing functionality not a RAW post-processor. Even Google ...


9

You can select which formats that Picasa displays from the 'File types' tab in 'Options': Tools > Options > File types then deselect 'RAW formats'. Picasa will then only display your JPEGs (and any other formats you may have selected in 'Options' such as TIFF).


8

In Linux I use Bibble, which is has some warts but which is the only serious option AFAICT. It's $99 for the Lite version and $199 for the Pro version, and you can download a free trial and check it out. The results look great. One reason you might be confused by Picasa is that the controls try to be "magic" and hide what is actually going on. In raw ...


8

In addition to the answer @max provided, an important feature of Aperture and Lightroom offer, is non-destructive editing. Basically, Aperture and Lightroom never make changes to your original images, but store the steps made to achieve the changes. See it like a 'recipe' to produce the changes; Aperture and Lightroom apply that recipe 'real-time'. ...


7

Smugmug has an optional feature called SmugVault (see also here) which allows storage of RAW and other file types. I have not used SmugVault so I can't review it for you, but I am a longtime customer and I love their other services. The files are stored on Amazon S3 servers. As I understand it your RAW files are linked to your jpg files of the same name. ...


7

Most RAW photos include a JPEG thumbnail (which is what you'll see initially); Then Picasa runs the RAW decoding (with different parameters to your camera), giving you your desaturated image.


6

You can do this fairly easily in Picasa. Simply select the Crop option, then "Add Custom Aspect Ratio" at the bottom of the crop options. This will allow you to select a custom size such as 8x8, then export export it as such. Below I have some screenshots to assist.


5

DigiKam On Linux (and with some effort on Windows), you can organize your workflow with digiKam. It is an advanced photo organizer, with 16-bit color depth support, color profiles, its own RAW processor, lens correction tool and a simple editor suitable for many tasks. You can invoke external tools too (I still invoke Gimp and UFRaw sometimes, when I need ...


5

Probably the most likely option is ExifTool as it seems to be the Swiss Army Knife of editors, though not the easiest for people to use.


5

I use Lightroom for my entire workflow now. One of the keys to remember about Lightroom (LR) is that it is more than just processing it is also a management program. So that not only does it allow you to process your images, it allows you to search your images later quickly and easily based on various criteria. I have been tweaking my workflow over the past ...


5

I can confirm that the EOS utility does import the duplicate files without any problems (and, as a side point, faster than Picasa too). For some reason the EOS utility is not on Canon's website and my CD is a few thousand miles away. Luckily I've found a workaround: Download EOS Utility updater from Canon's website Edit your registry (see below) to trick ...


5

Lightroom is a great app for organisation and workflow and from version 3 you can set up your Flickr, Smugmug/Facebook, whatever sharing accounts, and post directly from within Lightroom once you're happy with your photo :-) EDIT: Lightroom features website -- has a little video on there of publishing photos to external service. Flickr would also give you ...


5

Decoding the ini file is possible, but translating them exactly into darkroom/shotwell edits is going to be problematic. The image manipulation algorithms are different. Your best bet is to export high quality JPEGs (or if you have a lot of disk space you can use TIFFs) and keep the RAWs as an archive. This is the approach I have taken as I moved from ...


5

You are using Picasa. If you simply type in "Picasa Canon 6D" into Google, you will see that many other users have this problem. Why are you having this problem? Because Picasa does not support the Canon 6D RAW files. What can you do to fix this? Use the Adobe DNG Converter before opening up the files in Picasa. You could use something besides Picasa like ...


4

The benefit of Lightroom is very good, easy-to-use processing in a straightforward workflow environment with the ability to organize your photos in an intuitive way. Photoshop is a useful supplement to Lightroom for more complex, localized fixes, as Lightroom mostly works on the whole image at once (except for simple spot fixes). But Lightroom may not be ...


4

i'd recommend saving up for lightroom. It does everything you want and more. You will quickly outgrow picasa.


4

There is a technique called deconvolution which can, to some extent, recover distorted or blurred image detail. Topaz labs have a product called InFocus which uses this sort of technique. It can sharpen certain images, but if you have blurred your faces substantially, I believe it would be beyond the ability of any tool to recover. Maybe on CSI :P


4

If all your images are of the same size and you want to crop it to the same dimensions, you can use ImageMagick to get the job done. Take a look at the Crop details so as not be surprised by its behaviour :-)



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