Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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0

If you are asking to the equivalent to Illustrators "select same" function - you can use the Magic Wand tool in Photoshop, click on the color you're trying to get a hold of and then goto Select > Similar and the magic wand selection will now cover everything that matches your selected color.


1

Symbian? Have you tried Photo Effect? Probably your best bet is to find a way to install Android on that smartphone :P For Android I highly recommend Pixlr Express - which is free, simple to use, and does everything you need.


1

Assuming you shot images out of order, the files in the list have to be in the order you want them to be stitched, so renaming the files, or adding them in order, (i.e., add all the images to the left, then your central one, then all the images to the right) are probably your only options. You could also use a fuller-featured stitcher, such as Hugin (open ...


0

The RX100 requires a minimum of camera raw 7.2 http://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/camera-raw-plug-supported-cameras.html Photoshop CS2 supports camera raw versions 3.0-3.7 http://helpx.adobe.com/x-productkb/global/camera-raw-compatible-applications.html So you don't need a new computer, but you need a much more recent version of Photoshop(CS6 or ...


0

Well, you've certainly run into "The Photoshop Tax" on new cameras. :) To get Photoshop/ACR to open a RAW file directly, it must be a new enough version that groks the RAW of the camera model. And since RAW is not a file format or a standard, and changes with each camera model, and Adobe has no time-travel capability, this means a version of ACR that came ...


0

I would use the larger brush then! If that results in you changing more of the picture than you wanted (brush too large to be accurate), then use a mask (and a smaller brush) to mask in/out the areas that you want. So: 1) Create a layer 2) Use 500px brush to change your color 3) Add a black mask to the image - this will hide all your color changes 4) Use ...


1

I can't believe no one suggested this yet: Just use the rectangular marquee to select what you want to crop down to, and COPY it to your clipboard. Then delete the entire layer and PASTE what you copied to a new layer. This is especially useful if the layer you're cropping is larger than the canvas, in which case the select-inverse technique is messy.


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As the previous answer demonstrates, you can merge the different exposures using layers. But it's a lot of work. I'd suggest trying enfuse, which I've been quite happy with. It produces realistic looking output, not the dreaded "HDR look", and does so with pretty much no work on your part. It runs via the command line. However, if you have Lightroom ...


2

I believe @Jasmine is correct and just so you know, there's really no such thing as a "macro lens effect." Macro photography usually means that the size of the subject and the size of its reproduction on the sensor/film plane are the same, 1:1. Think of photographing the head of a bee, in the case of macro photography the image of the bees head on the ...


1

What seems to have been done is to enhance the contrast while the skin of the woman has been treated with "digital makeup". There are specialized G'MIC tools that you can use to make a person look younger.The problem with doing this by hand is that you need selectively blur the skin to remove the unwanted small scale features while making sure you hide the ...


1

Besides the retouching it appears to only have gotten a treatment with some contrast tool (like levels or curves) and a saturation adjustment. Nothing fancy! user342626 might be right with the dodge and burn tools; they are used to "paint" onto the image, making it darker or brighter. That way the editor can paint with "light" and give form and depth to the ...


1

I agree with the comment. Your camera probably came with software to do this. Look for contrast and more broadly, curves adjustments. The background may have been handled by selecting that color to change it, or by using a dodging tool to lighten it. If you don't have software for that, check out your local retail store that sells software. They'll have a ...


2

For the bloom you can duplicate the layer, blur it and set its transfer mode to screen or add. You might need to play with a curves adjustment to control how much bloom you have. The blur on the caterpillar might be recreated with a directional blur on a smart object and then some masking to limit it to desired locations. A shallow depth of field is hard ...


0

The simplest path is to use Camera Raw plugin which is shipped with Photoshop. In Photoshop CC there is an entry in the Filter menu called 'Camera Raw Filter' (note that there are other ways to invoke it - for example, for raw files it runs automatically when you try to open the file). Run the filter and play with the 'Clarity', 'Vibrance' and (less with) ...


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You could also try to use lower level image processing software, like e.g. ImageJ. Just split the picture into the separate color channels, perform whatever mathematical manipulations you want on the pixel values and then combine the channels.


0

You can adjust saturation: http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/adjusting-hue-saturation.html I would use Lightroom. It is much easier to use for photography


1

Because that is what they are. Effects have to be applied in an order. Input levels are adjustments to the levels that are coming in to the system. Output levels are adjustments to levels going out of the system. For example, perhaps on the input, a medium grey is actually what we want to be the darkest part of the image, so we set the input black point ...


4

Think of the levels adjustment as a mathematical function; you pass in something (input), it does something to it, and returns a result (output). The input is the existing (original) value and the output is the result after the adjustment has been applied. If you open an image and apply a levels adjustment layer and look at the input sliders, first at the ...


0

I think using Mike's suggestion of creating masks using the difference modes might be the only way to do it. What you want is the content of one layer that is not is another, which is what the difference mode highlights.


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The change in angle all but requires the use of panorama software such as Hugin because only(?) these programs have the features you need. You don't have to stitch the results as there's a flag to output single images.


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Saving in jpeg should not add noise. Yes it does not retain 100% of the data, but unless you use a very low quality factor when saving, you won't see any difference between a jpeg and a file in a lossless format under normal circumstances. But you are, so something odd is going on. So- here are some troubleshooting questions that I thought of: What quality ...



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