Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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0

Photoshop tries to detect the correct order and reorder them for you, based on the edges lining up. So to answer the why side, PS is probably confused based on the photographs' content about what order they go in. Several answers suggest using a different stitcher that allows you to specify the correct order manually, likely the best option.


0

You can use ffmpeg, a cross-platform command-line tool, to extract the frames you want as PNG files, which you can then open in Photoshop. From the documention, there are several approaches you can take. One would be: ffmpeg -i input.mp4 -ss 00:00:14.435 -vframes 1 out.png Where "00:00:14.435" identifies the time of the frame you want to extract.


0

According to supported formats list and similar experience of other users, you'll need an Adobe-supplied codec (e.g. from Adobe Premiere Pro) to open MPEG-2 files with Photoshop CS6 or newer; older versions relied on QuickTime.


0

using the saturation native saturation tool in gimp you can select the colors you want to boost it is a lot simpler than the methods mentioned above and as far as I can tell does a pretty good job of emulating the vibrance adjust in photoshop


0

Hmm, I think I will return this card I bought yesterday, it is a "SanDisk Extreme Pro 160MB/s UDMA 7 32GB" card. Because I disconnected it and connected the card again and opened the image and this time for a second or two until it was getting processed it still showed those lines but then it changes to fine and normal looking . I suspected it is an issue ...


0

No mette. You are doing it it wrong Xo) 1) You already have a photo. DO NOT MANIPULATE IT! If it works, it works, if not... 2) Ok. What are the dimensions of your original photo? 3) @ths already gave you some recomendations. Sumarize here: For an A2 (42.0 x 59.4 cm) (16.53 x 23.38 inch) print: 100 ppi 1653 x 2338 px. (4 Mpx photo, Just enough quality) ...


0

As print size increases, the required resolution decreases, since the typical viewing distance gets greater, too. For A2, a resolution of 100dpi may be acceptable (the chart here recommends double that, though), for A0, 50dpi, which means a pixel size of 2346x1661, at minimum. That said, if your original photo is smaller than that, no amount of resizing in ...


-1

At 644 by 1000 pixels and 300 pixels per inch, your photo is 644/300 by 1000/300 or about 2.15 by 3.33 inches. This translates to 54.53 by 84.667 mm, well below the size requested. You need to blow it up by 422/54.53 or about a factor 8 to meet the requirement. I would suggest you print it at home in the larger size and think about whether it is suitable ...


1

Depending upon the browser you're using, you may not be comparing apples-to-apples (or jpegs-to-jpegs in this case). Facebook added the .webp compression for uploaded photos a while back and displays them in that format within browsers that support WebP. Details on the WebP format are available at: http://www.sitepoint.com/webp-image-format/ A good ...


0

Exporting from Lightroom or Photoshop should convert the image to sRGB for Web consumption. The reason you may see the same image differently in Lightroom, Photoshop, and a Web browser may lie in several factors: Whether the image is converted to sRGB or not The browser used, not all browsers are color managed Display calibration and profiling, which is a ...


5

What I'm wondering is, why do my pictures not look the same across the board?! I'm sure I will have an experience that one time I upload a picture to Facebook or somewhere online and the picture not coming looking good. It is not possible to tell from a screenshot what Facebook did to your picture, but I would not be surprised if it converted it ...


1

The images look different because of different color spaces. To fix it stop using ProPhoto RGB color space and instead use sRGB to produce consistent results for web. Secondarily, determine if your browser is capable of managing color spaces and find out what it is using. Also, ensure your monitor is properly calibrated using a hardware solution.


0

Facebook applies a pretty aggressive compression and resize to the uploaded images to save space and bandwidth. This should not change colors (it actually does, but adding artifacts, not changing tones), unless the source image has an "unsupported" color profile for the compression library. I experienced some color issues while compressing JPEGs made with ...


1

It looks like a filter hasn't been used here. Instead it looks like the photographer gas increased both the colour saturation and contrast of the image. And then to finish it off a vignette has been added.


0

Use one mask for the body and another mask for the hair. You can then adjust them separately, combine them or use each on a separate layer as required.


2

I'm sorry to tell you that whoever told you that it was some 'secret sauce' added in post production either doesn't know as much as they think they do or has been having you on. What you're seeing in the example images is from an effect called cross-polarisation. It's where light entering the camera has interacted with multiple polarisers. In the images ...


2

This is how lossless editing works. This is a BIG concept. Lossless edits never change the original data, edit versions merely store the list of edit operations we specify. If we subsequently edit the data more times later, we never change the original data, we merely edit the list of changes. Then we "output" the change by writing a new JPG file copy, ...


0

I have resolved this issue. It's Photoshop problem. My and printing service's photoshops have different color profiles. In printing dialog the option "Allow using printer colors" (or something like this) should be selected. In this case printer will control color profile - will use printer colors. So it's a workaround.


0

I haven't run my favourite image analysis tools on your image but it seems the effects you are looking for are post-processing effects (no obvious use of filters). For the colors, you will probably get something very similar with some contrast adjustment and by playing with saturation and vibrance. Same thing for the vignetting, the tools of your favorite ...


0

This is impossible. The most basic way to 'zoom' in on a picture is to display it on a huge screen, like a TV. That will already zoom the picture several times larger, and you cannot stop that.



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