Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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0

I am worried about the idea that all must be done automaticly. Here is an image of the result you could get with an "automated process". Now imagine seeing 10 of thoose slides... Boring... Now imagine that you insert one by one, resize, fit, organize, etc. Now the image has meaning. Because it is inserted one by one, resized, fited and organized. ...


2

Do the math. Your photo is currently 18 inches wide and 300 DPI. You want to enlarge it to 16 feet = 192 inches. That's a factor of 192 / 18 = 11. That means the original 300 DPI will be 28 DPI. Pixels will be 1/28 inch wide, or 0.9 mm. Now you have to decide whether that's good enough. To decide that, print out something at 28 DPI and see how far ...


1

This is very easily done in Post Processing, I'll do it using Photoshop. I did it with 3 adjustment layers which I'll explain. First I did a Color Fill with Blend Mode set to fill using a bronze color. I then adjusted the Blend-If Lightness, Underlying Layer to 0/231, 50/255 Then I did a Contrast Curve on the Lightness pulling the midtones down and ...


1

Try Dehaze in LR or ACR. If that does not work for you, try experimenting with vibrancy/warmer white balance/clarity applied gradually over the area with the haze. The tool names probably differ in non-Adobe products...


-1

Add a sky. I just quickly tried with Paint.Net (not the most advanced tool ever) and current sky is selected perfectly by the wand mode. Then steal a nice looking sky from another of your shot, put into a layer behind, and blend. Really quick editing on the already processed jpg, sky kindly provided from the city of Amsterdam:


2

Recent Adobe Lightroom (& Camera RAW) versions have a feature called "dehaze", which is designed specifically for this sort of thing. It's a little more advanced than just levels adjustment. I've had mixed success with it - sometimes it looks good, sometimes the resulting image has excessively muddy shadows. I believe it works a bit like auto levels but ...


0

Each program has its own algorithm for these processes and the result will be different. Indeed, programs like Photoshop have a lot of different ways to make any adjustment. And you have a lot of parameters that may adjust, not only a numerical level. Moreover, as they have told you, they work with different versions of the image file.


0

There are several types of "editing". For example: 1) Just adjusting contrast, brightnes, etc. Advantages on doing it on a larger file. None. 2) Sharpening must be done on the final image, for example on your 500x500px one. 3) If you need to get detail from an image, for example take a specific sample on some point of the image to make the white balance, ...


0

If you mean scaling: You should do most of your edits on the original image size. That way you edit once and resize/reuse the final result for print (large size) and viewing on the screen (smaller size). If you do the edits on your 500x500px, you need to do it all over again for print and again in few years when resolution of displays increases and you will ...


3

You will not get the same result at all. When you start with your 2000x2000 pixel image you have some scene or subject in it. If you crop it down to 500x500 pixels then you will only have 1/16th of the subject in it. However if you have a 500x500 with the same but lower resolution content, you will have an entire subject. What you can do instead is scale ...


2

Try to look at the histogram of the pictures. Is it unbalanced to the left? If so, you may be tricked by the preview screen. Also, could it be due to the screen you are using, which has poor contrast or low backlighting? Note that, typically, laptop screens don't have much contrast unless you set the backlight high or if exposed to sunlight.


5

Pradeep Sekar was in the right direction but is probably using an old version of Photoshop. Using Photoshop CC, here comes a step-by-step solution : Open your sphere image in Photoshop. Here an image from http://photography.tutsplus.com/articles/using-polar-coordinates-to-turn-landscapes-into-planets-and-more--photo-9998 as example : Go to Filter > ...


-1

This is just a theory and has not been tested so I wouldn't know how the output would be. You try to invert the image 1st and then try the "Photoshop Filter > Distortion > Spherize". Do submit the results here



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