Watching Over

by Vian Esterhuizen

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0

My comments are becoming short answers, so I'll start an answer already. Originally I figured without the specific numbers but only a citation it was a comment. Anyway, it is no accident that the axis of CIE LAB color spaces match the way our eyes perceive (oppenent perceptual space). I foind this treatise to be fascinating and very detailed, concerning how ...


1

The folders panel represents the actual file structure in Lightroom. Photos will not appear from subfolders unless you turn on the "Show Photos in Subfolders" option. This option is located under the "+" in the upper right corner of the folders panel. When this option is toggled off, you must select each folder to see the images in that location. This ...


6

I asked Dan to answer your questions. Here is what he wrote: "Anything prepared with color fidelity in mind is best viewed in a graphic arts viewing booth or, if none is available, sunlight or equivalent. That said, one shouldn't take a product printed on an offset press too seriously as there will be unavoidable slight variation between copies. The poster ...


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As mentioned by jdlugosz your first line of attack is going to be the black and shadow sliders in LR 5 (you'll have much poor results in lightroom 4 or older), but as you boost up the exposure in the blacks you're going to likely be adding in a bunch of noise. It's going to be a challenge fixing it very well, but here's my line of attack: Globally, do what ...


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Photoshop has a Highlight/Shadow adjuster that is very handy for exactly that. In ACR or Lightroom, you have better control and the labeled sliders and histogram zones are easy to understand. In dXo's raw converter, it magically figures it out, but you can still fiddle with it. Check out their free trial, and run your image through it. Since you mention ...


-1

While you may be able to edit the file into looking a little bit like that, specially if you use layered edition in photoshop, the easiest, fastest and I'd even say best way of achieving that effect is to just shoot in the golden hour. https://500px.com/photo/94181465/the-girl-and-the-tree-by-jorge-c%C3%B3rdoba-sim%C3%B3n That photo was taken during the ...


0

This would be pretty easy to do using colo(u)r balance in photoshop shadows boosted blue + magenta mid-tones more magenta more cyan and yellow in highlights


3

You can reverse-engineer the coloring in Lightroom. In the following copy I simply white-balanced on the subject's shirt, resulting in this "less-golden" image that looks more likely true to the original color. Lightroom indicates that the transformation "back to normal" involved significant color shifts towards blue and magenta (-15 temp and +11 tint).


1

First and foremost, when it comes to astrophotography, to improve SNR (and, thus, improve signal) - stack! Stack, stack, stack. Total integration time, the total exposure time across all the sub frames you gather, is of paramount importance to improving image quality in astrophotography. Most beginners shirk on getting the necessary minimum amount of ...


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I don't think the original photo was produced using only global white balance adjustment. It appears to have been produced using mixed light sources (fill strobes not matched to the ambient light temperature) and/or some local adjustments as well. This can be done by selecting various areas in different layers and altering the color for that specific area. ...


5

An important part of that look is the lighting, which is most likely achieved by shooting during the golden hour. You can also tell from the lack of harsh shadows on the subject. Besides that, I see a green/yellow predominance in the tint, probably reproducible by white balance correction. I did a quick experiment using GIMP, and using color balance ...


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You can use StarStaX to average the pictures if you want. It has a lot simpler interface than Photoshop (and is free!) for that kind of task.


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you have two choices the first method use software (photoshop) shoot from the same angle using your tripod (preferable) - time laps shoots. or shoot when you can see the street is clearer as much as possible some shoots. now combine all your shoots in photoshop using Auto-align and median tool. for more information please see that video ...


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You can certainly make multiple prints from developed negatives — in fact, that's why the photo lab gave you those negatives in the first place. It's also worth nothing that especially with black and white, decisions made as part of the printing process can have a major effect on the result — in today's digital parallel universe, the negative is sort of like ...


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Look at the slice featute in save for web and save it as a set of tiles of reasonable size.


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Don't use "save for web", just use "save as" -> "jpeg" instead. You can save it at any size you want then.


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"Save for web and devices..." is all about file size management. It's hard to argue that a 45MP image (2:3 aspect ratio with the long side at 8191) is slightly too small for a web page (yet, at least). And convenience, I suppose, since it offers one-stop shopping for a bunch of things that would otherwise be separate menu options. You can use Image→Mode... ...


0

Have you considered a "green screen" solution? It's common in the video realm, and I believe Photoshop has a tool to do this. More sophisticated versions can address color spill (when the reflection from the green screen causes the foreground object to be tinged green at the edges) and preserve shadows.


0

You would probably be better off shooting a product photography tent. Go 2 stop higher for background of tent, then use flags on the flash to light the powder. I would suggest using 2 lights, one at each side, with less power on one of them to give you shadow.


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I found this technique and it works quite well. Instead of adding one layer copy i added 5, one for the centre and I moved the other 4 copies into each direction which resulted in rounder stars. It really amplified the stars nicely but other touchup work was needed to bring back sharpness in the foreground. The basic idea is to: Open photo in Photoshop ...


2

A way I always found intensifies the stars in my astro photography is to introduce a bit of clarity - really makes the stars pop! Also have a play around with the colours in the luminosity sliders as this always works for me. Hope this helps :)


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This is mostly guess work, but if you can use the backlit glass against a solid white you might be able to take a few shots and combine them in photoshop. For the first shot (image A), turn the backlight off and shoot the shot you would like to use. For the second shot (image B), turn the backlight on, and really underexpose the image. This will give you ...



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