Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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1

When I implemented curves in my own image viewer, I first just did it on the RGB values. It annoyed me that it seemed to screw up the color balance, especially when increasing the brightness with the curve. Then I made the option to decide what the LUT should apply to. E.g. Luminance of the YUV transform. I found that luminance is better for brightening ...


1

You definitely need to ensure that the curves processing happens in exact same color spaces. What you describe may be caused by different tone response curves (for example using Prophoto vs. sRGB) Even then there might be differences: Photoshop apparently uses perceptual processing in some areas of the program where some other apps prefer simpler math It ...


2

Photoshop's Photomerge is relatively limited as panorama stitching packages go. And most auto stitching programs require enough overlap and significant enough features to be able to match the images together. Shots where there may not be enough distinguishing detail in the overlap areas to anchor accurately can be problematic. In your scene, the ocean and ...


1

I am not sure if you can rescue the panorama above in Photoshop; manual work is problematic since Photoshop transforms the images to fit a chosen "layout". (An aside - it seems your horizon is not level, and normally this is crucial for these types of panos; your stand and head must be properly leveled. If you try to correct this in Photoshop the height of ...


0

It depends on what type of file you are editing with Photoshop or Lightroom. Those applications handle raw files in a totally different way than they handle jpegs, pngs, or even tiffs. The biggest difference between editing a jpeg using photoshop and editing it with most online editors is the degree of control over the adjustments. You will likely not only ...


2

Once you have the circles in your shots, the damage is done. The stronger light in the ring-form has overwritten some information that you would like to see there, and just because human brains suggest that it is still there below the rings, it isn't. It is overwritten and gone. What you can do, with appropriately qualified software, is manually 'heal', ...


0

There are 2 things to be taken care 1.It will work only on documents with original background layer 2.You have to set the desired color on the canvas extension area in the canvas option


-1

It is impossible to get original images back in Photoshop. File recovery software are available. There is no way if you overwrite the edited one with the originals..


1

The odds are against it, if you didn't take care of your files then you really only have yourself to blame. That said, there is a feature called "previous versions" in Windows which has been around for quite some time and, if enabled, may save your bacon provided system restore was/is configured correctly, which it may have been by default. ...


7

Probably not, unless you saved in Photoshop's native format and the files have a layer which corresponds to the original unaltered image. If you saved in jpeg or another "flat" format — or if you edited the image directly without using layers — you are going to be out of luck.


1

Yes, it's possible, but a consumer software is probably not yet available. One of the recent examples: Let there be Color!: Joint End-to-end Learning of Global and Local Image Priors for Automatic Image Colorization with Simultaneous Classification by Satoshi Iizuka, Edgar Simo-Serra and Hiroshi Ishikawa from Waseda University Abstract We ...


0

Similar to the logic used by the GIMP plugin mentioned in Roflo's answer, you can also use the color picture to colorize the gray scale picture. You then first approximately align the two pictures (using e.g. Hugin). Then take the color image, transform to XYZ colorspace and attempt to correlate the gray values in the X and Z channels to the gray values in ...


0

You can also use channels in Photoshop to help bring it back. A lot of photographs are restored by using this method. Here is a link to a tutorial. I have no affiliation or gain from linking to this website. Hope it helps! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2Srw245R7U


1

If you're willing to use GIMP instead of Photoshop, there's a plugin named colorize-gimp just for that reason. If you don't know or want to compile, apparently there's a compiled Windows version available.


0

Stiching multiple image, probably shot on a fisheye lens and remapping using Pano2VR, or Flexify will do the purpose.


0

Here is a page where you can get overlays to add the type of light effects you are looking for: https://www.etsy.com/shop/LanternLaneGifts There are a few different ones to choose from, but this one looks close to what you are going for: https://www.etsy.com/listing/210317470 Hope this helps! -Tim



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