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25

From a photography business owner's perspective, the reasons I use a pro lab are: Paper selection - My lab offers me literally a dozen options for paper. Size Matters - Try getting a supermarket to print you a 30x60. ;-) Seriously, though... I rarely print anything smaller than an 8x10, and most of the time bigger than that... Supermarkets are designed to ...


23

When it comes down to quality, outside of the general consumer ink jet printers which are generally not recommended for quality photo printing at home, the difference between a commercial wide-format printer in a lab and a professional wide-format printer for home use is minimal. At worst, the overall quality between a lab print and a print from a Canon ...


15

Here's a dirty little secret: 35mm film has no aspect ratio at all until it is exposed. It is just one blank piece of film a specific width (35mm) and any practical length with perforations occupying the outer edges that leave a 24mm wide strip in between the perforations. What determines the dimensions of the photo is the size of the film plane each ...


15

Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


11

The advantages of having your own printer are: You don't wait for prints Your cost per copy can be lower (the more you print, the quicker your average print cost decreases). You don't pay for shipping Directly control the results Labs on the other hand: More printing options (canvas, wide-prints, extra large prints etc). Cost to Quality Ratio is higher ...


10

I highly recommend Mpix. They produce great quality prints at very reasonable prices, and have a variety of products available


10

The big trade-off is quality for convenience. Grocery and department stores (like Walmart and Target) are pretty common, so they are fairly convenient to get to. Most of those types of stores are limited to prints that are 8x10 or smaller. Their decent enough for family pictures and sharing physical pictures with your friends. However, I find the ...


8

There are a few key differences typically. The quality of the ink is higher, usually standing the test of time better. The color gamut is usually higher, resulting in richer colors. The paper quality is typically higher, resulting in both of the above. Even among the pro printers, there can be differences. See the Smugmug Photo Lab comparison, for ...


8

The biggest is color management by far. I use the term "photolab" instead of "online printing company." Ensure your files have the correct color space attached. Many pro labs support a variety of color spaces, so you should use the one that they recommend. Have your monitor color calibrated using a hardware colorimeter. Eye balling it, will not give you ...


7

This site has a CVS Pharmacy's ICC profile, its based on the specific printer and paper they use: http://www.drycreekphoto.com/icc/Profiles/Massachusetts_profiles.htm Looks like they have ICC profiles for all sorts of random print labs across the country.


7

They're not the cheapest, but the quality is superb, so I'm a fan of WHCC. Also... the account setup isn't exactly quick, but that's a one time process including a test print job, which helps ensure that you get accurate printing.


7

www.AdoramaPix.com Reasonably priced and I've always found the quality to be top notch.


7

I would think that a lab's color-correcting quality is dependent upon the lab and the skill of the technicians. There probably is not a single, globally correct answer here, as every lab will use different equipment and have different people with different levels of skill. That said, when it comes to color correction for print, taking the paper into account ...


7

You can have slide film processed like normal film, left in long strips, or more commonly they are individually cut into single frames and mounted in a cardboard or plastic holder, which keeps them flat, and these mounted slides can then be put in a cartridge of a slide projector. The mounts can be seen here. The processing is exactly the same, so no ...


7

There are a number of drop ship printers out there. A few include: White House Custom Color MPIX Bay Photo I recommend looking at their web sites to determine if their needs suit your particular ones. Many local professional photographers in my area use these three services. I have used 2 of the 3 myself without issue.


6

I'm a big fan of photobox who operate in the UK and across Europe (but not the USA). They are decent value, support standard prints up to 12"x10", poster prints up to 45"x30", along with other options for printing on canvas or acrylic, have a large range of options for things they'll print your photos on mugs, mouse mats etc. Standard prints have a ...


6

While not a traditional "print lab", there's a web service that integrates with several print labs and gives exactly what you want: SmugMug. I believe we hit all your requirements: All prints from SmugMug are drop shipped without the invoice. Some items do ship with a workorder, but there's no prices on it. Pro account holders have several branding ...


5

It's possible, but Mpix is trying to protect you from yourself. Your camera's 8 megapixels make an image with something like 2448 × 3264 pixels. That means that when you print an image 16 inches wide, you end up with about 150 pixels per inch. If you look closely, you may see some blockiness, and the phone camera's image quality probably isn't such that it ...


5

Without example pictures, it's difficult to tell exactly what the problem (or constellation of problems) is, but what you are describing could easily be the result of extreme underexposure of the film (more than 2 stops) without any compensation in development (that is, the film was developed for the normal time). Colour noise happens in film as well as in ...


4

Being a photo printer owner for many years I now get everything printed at a lab. The inconvenience of having to send off is more than offset by the quality and versatility offered. Not having to deal with ink cartridges, different types of photo paper, cropping etc. is worth the small additional cost. There's not a lot to chose between the major online ...


4

Have a look at http://www.pwinty.com This in an API for printing and shipping photos, and offers worldwide shipping. They let you specify your own custom branding, and invoices to be included within the package- sounds like exactly what you are after.


4

It depends. You can instruct them to not do any "correction" and sometimes you will still get 'auto-corrected' or 'operator-corrected' prints. Some labs offer "machine scanned and corrected prints" at one price tier and "human reviewed" prints at a higher priced tier. Sometimes it depends on who is operating the machine when your prints are created and the ...


3

A typical digital projector has to project the whole image at once. My guess is the minilab digital printers work by sweeping a laser beam across the image one line at a time, in a simmilar fashion to how old cathode ray tube TVs and monitors work. That way they can get a much higher resolution image than a typical digital projector, which shines a bright ...


3

I've recently done a survey of the cheap ~€0.10 per 3:2 photo sites in Europe, and selected 10 photo's with different difficulties, than used 2 persons to each select the best print of every photo. The results, 90% of the selected pictures were the SnapFish prints, so that made it easy for me, for €0.09 per photo, and the ability to disable any on site ...


3

You're up against a few factors: Your own monitor color situation. Unless you're using a color calibration tool, it's very likely that your monitor isn't showing color correctly and you're either used to it or it's close enough that you haven't noticed. Not all software treats color space the same or even at all. Depending on what you're using to view the ...


3

This is probably down to calibration of your monitor being out and what you see on the monitor not being a true representation of the image. For instance if the contrast is too high on your monitor what looks like a good image on the monitor can look very flat and soft when printed out. Try something like Adobe Gamma to calibrate your monitor by eye or ...



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