Orquid "Phoenix"

Orquid "Phoenix"

by ceinmart

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16

Because they can. That is perhaps the only true answer to your question. As to why they would want to, just follow the money: In the age of digital reproduction an unauthorized copy of a work of art can have a significant impact on sales of authorized prints or books that generate revenue for the gallery, artist, or owner of the piece. If the piece is ...


12

The actual reason vary from place to place but I guess common reasons are: Because they want you to buy a print in the gift shop Light from a flash can actually degrade the painting (this may be a myth, I don't have the expertize to decide based on the evidence) They don't want people standing in front of the painting too long and blocking the passage It ...


11

One key reason is that the museum may not own the piece, and therefore, only have the right to exhibit the piece. They can not transfer the right to reproduce or allow a piece to be reproduced, because that would cause them legal issues. This is especially true in museums that are exhibiting pieces that are not part of their collection. As others have ...


8

Trademarks can be used to describe the thing they name by people other than the trademark owner. That is, you don't have to say "that annual 26.2 mile race in the capital of Massachusetts" even though the Boston Athletic Association controls the "Boston Marathon" trademark. Photographs of things with logos on them can be analogous — you may take a photo of a ...


7

All laws will vary by jurisdiction, and you'd be best advised to speak to a qualified lawyer if you intend to sell or publish your pictures; but in general, if you're in a public place, then you can take a photo of whatever you like (as long as you're not breaking other laws, such as those dealing with public nudity). Be aware that some seemingly public ...


5

I live in the Czech Republic, and travelled a little bit around neighouring countries. As for the legal situation, I know we have a freedom of panorama. Practically, I don't remember having any issues with protographing stuff around me, even though there are some private and publicly accessible spaces (like shopping centers), where photography is forbidden, ...


5

95% of the famous temples are functioning under the Government. If somebody tells you that photography is prohibited, ask for the administrative office and inform the administrative officials that you are wanting permission. More often than not, this will be accepted without any hassle, but, there are very small number of temples where photography is ...


5

Summary: The short answer is that a photographer seems to have very wide rights in Australia - more so than in many other countries. When in a public place you can take photos of people also in public, and of people who you can see from the public place, with some limitations re looking into buildings etc. There are some limitations on photos of armed ...


5

You'll find that laws do exist restricting photography but they are more around common sense scenarios. For example, setting up a tripod in public is alright. Setting up a tripod in public in a way that inconveniences or blocks others counts as a public obstructions, for which there are laws. That's common sense. Similarly, you are good to take photos ...


4

Almost all museums don't allow flash photography because flashes will may cause damage to the work over time if UV is not properly filtered. As far as non-flash photography, a great many museums are totally fine with it, including many of the best. The Louvre in Paris and the Smithsonian in DC both allow photography of anything in their exhibits. Those ...


3

You have every right to take pictures in a public place. You can sell your images as artwork even if they contained logos. However, if you want to use them in advertising, that's a very different thing. So when you say you want to use them commercially, it depends on the use. Stock photo companies prohibit images that contain trademarks and logos. There ...


3

If you are a commercial photographer, then yes you would carry model releases with you, or use an app to record the information. Otherwise you would get the person's name and contact details and obtain permission later. You have the right to take photos on public property, in public places where people don't have the expectation of privacy. That doesn't ...


3

The guidelines you quoted are only for images obtained from Airbus, they simply do not apply to any images taken by you. Any image you don't get from Airbus is not subject to their image use guidelines, technically speaking Airbus as no rights to your picture and can't tell you what to do with it - but you are subject to normal trademark/copyright law (the ...


3

In Short: It is legal. In some temples, particularly in Tamil Nadu and Kerala, photography is not allowed - within the sanctum sanctorum of the temple. In particularly orthodox temples, even taking a camera or a cell phone is prohibited. If you wish to shoot sculptures, I believe you need a written note from the temple administration - something that can ...


3

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer, so don't take this as legal advice In Sweden, the rules are very simple: if you're on public property (i.e. the street, a park) you can take photos of anything that isn't considered a "secure compound" (these are clearly marked by signs). If you're on private property (this includes e.g. at least the indoors parts of train ...



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